chap05 - Customer Premise Equipment and Application Chapter...

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Customer Premise Equipment and Application Chapter 5
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Objectives In this chapter, you will learn to: Discuss the purpose of customer premise equipment in a telecommunications network Identify the significant components of a modern telephone Discuss the varieties of station equipment Explain how private switching systems integrate with both CPE and the PSTN Describe how enhanced CPE services and applications work and how businesses benefit from using them
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Introduction to Customer Premise Equipment Everything on the consumer’s side of the demarcation point is known as customer premise equipment (CPE), because it resides on the customer’s premises. In telecommunications, a telephone and any connected parts are known as station equipment because in the business world, they are located at a person’s station, or desk.
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Inside a Modern Telephone
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Handset
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Handset
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Local Loop Current
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Wiring
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Wiring Tip - the wire that supplies the ground (or zero charge) from the central office’s battery to the telephone. Ring - the wire that carries a negative charge (-48 V) from the central office’s battery to a telephone. In other words, the ring is the wire that carries signals. Hybrid coil - introduced into telephone sets to separate the incoming transmit and receive signals into their own two-wire connections.
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Wiring
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Ringer The device that sounds a bell or tone to indicate an incoming call. Ringing tone/ringback - the tone created by the combined frequencies of 440 Hz and 480 Hz. Distinctive ringing - a unique ringing sound or cadence for different types of calls.
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Dialer Rotary dialing - a user chooses a number and turns a wheel from that number to the finger stop then releases the wheel. Touch-tone dialers - operate by transmitting a combination of two frequencies each time a button is pressed. Pressing each button issues a different combination of frequencies.
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Dialer
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Dialer
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Station Protection
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Station Protection
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Pay Telephones Telephones provided for public use that require coin, collect, or credit card payment to complete calls. COCOT (customer-owned coin-operated
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This note was uploaded on 10/25/2009 for the course IT 300 taught by Professor Staff during the Spring '08 term at George Mason.

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chap05 - Customer Premise Equipment and Application Chapter...

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