chap14 - Convergence of Voice, Video, and Data Chapter 14...

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Convergence of Voice, Video, and Data Chapter 14
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Objectives In this chapter, you will learn to: Identify terminology used to describe applications and other aspects of converged networks Describe several different applications available on converged networks Outline possible VoIP implementations and examine the costs and benefits of VoIP Explain methods for encoding analog voice or video signals as digital signals for transmission over a packet-switched network Identify the key signaling and transport protocols that may be used with VoIP Understand Quality of Service (QoS) challenges on converged net-works and discuss techniques that can improve QoS
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Terminology Voice over IP (VoIP) - the use of any network (either public or private) to carry voice signals using TCP/IP. Voice over frame relay (VoFR) - the use of a frame-relay network to transport packetized voice signals Voice over DSL (VoDSL) - the use of a DSL connection to carry packetized voice signals Fax over IP (FoIP) - uses packet-switched networks to transmit faxes from one node on the network to another.
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Voice Over IP (VoIP) The use of packet-switched networks and the TCP/IP protocol suite to transmit voice conversations. Reasons for implementing VoIP may include: To improve business efficiency and competitiveness To supply new or enhanced features and applications To centralize voice and data network management To improve employee productivity To save money
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VoIP and Traditional Telephones Techniques for converting a telephone signal from digital form include: Using an adapter card within a computer workstation. Connecting the traditional telephone to a switch capable of accepting traditional voice signals, converting them into packets, then issuing the packets to a data network. Connecting the traditional telephone to an analog PBX, which then connects to a voice-data gateway to convert the signals.
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VoIP and Traditional Telephones
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VoIP and IP Telephones
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VoIP and IP Telephones Popular features unique to IP telephones include: Screens on IP telephones can act as Web browsers, allowing a user to open HTTP-encoded pages and, for example, click a telephone number link to complete a call to that number. IP telephones may connect to a user’s personal digital
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This note was uploaded on 10/25/2009 for the course IT 300 taught by Professor Staff during the Spring '08 term at George Mason.

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chap14 - Convergence of Voice, Video, and Data Chapter 14...

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