Lecture070

Lecture070 - Momentum, Impulse and Collisions Linear...

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Unformatted text preview: Momentum, Impulse and Collisions Linear momentum The linear momentum of an object is the product of the objects mass times its velocity. Linear momentum is a vector quantity and has the same direction as the velocity. The units of linear momentum are kilogram.meter/second. There are many situations when the force on an object is not constant. The Impulse-momentum theorem Impulse: The product of the average force and the time interval during which the force acts. The impulse is a vector quantity Units are Newton seconds (N s) The Impulse-momentum theorem There are many situations when the force on an object is not constant. The Impulse-momentum theorem The Impulse-momentum theorem When a net force acts on an object, the impulse of this force is equal to the change in momentum of the object! The Impulse-momentum theorem You are testing a new car using crash test dummies. Consider two ways to slow the car from 90 km/h (56 mi/h) to a complete stop: (i) You let the car slam into a wall, bringing it to a sudden stop. (ii) You let the car plow into a giant tub of gelatin so that it comes to a gradual halt. In which case is there a greater impulse of the net force on the car? A. in case (i) B. in case (ii) C. The impulse is the same in both cases. D. not enough information given to decide You are testing a new car using crash test dummies. Consider two ways to slow the car from 90 km/h (56 mi/h) to a complete stop: (i) You let the car slam into a wall, bringing it to a sudden stop. (ii) You let the car plow into a giant tub of gelatin so that it comes to a gradual halt. In which case is there a greater impulse of the net force on the car? A. in case (i) B. in case (ii) C. The impulse is the same in both cases. D. not enough information given to decide A. 20 kg m/s to the right B. 20 kg m/s to the left C. 4.0 kg m/s to the right D. 4.0 kg m/s to the left E. none of the above A ball (mass 0.40 kg) is initially moving to the left at 30 m/s. After hitting the wall, the ball is moving to the right at 20 m/s. What is the impulse of the net force on the ball during its collision with the wall? A ball (mass 0.40 kg) is initially moving to the left at 30 m/s. After hitting the wall, the ball is moving to the right at 20 m/s. What is the impulse of the net force on the ball during its collision with the wall?...
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This note was uploaded on 10/25/2009 for the course PHYS 1501Q taught by Professor Bloomfield during the Fall '08 term at UConn.

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Lecture070 - Momentum, Impulse and Collisions Linear...

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