10on1kafka - In Kafkas A Starvation Artist, he demonstrates...

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In Kafka’s “A Starvation Artist,” he demonstrates how suffering is interrelated with art and that one cannot exist without the other. The artist derives pleasure from suffering; he views suffering as an art over which he has ultimate control and free will. However, as he loses his free will after he loses his audience, he begins to realize that he is like all the others and that he starves, not because of free will, but because he “could not find the food he liked.” This realization begins to form in the paragraph located on page 92 in which the starvation artist finds a new place by the animal sheds. As a starvation artist, the subject wants to make a statement and have his art seen. Thus, he places himself strategically by the animal sheds in order to gain a better audience. Simultaneously, however, he also abhors the times when he has visitors: “The prospect of these visiting hours, for which the starvation artist naturally yearned, since they were the meaning of his life, also made him shudder.” When the
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10on1kafka - In Kafkas A Starvation Artist, he demonstrates...

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