On Augustine

On Augustine - On Augustines view of the Will CWID:10476849...

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On Augustine’s view of the Will CWID:10476849
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The concept of free will has been hotly debated in the philosophical arena. It is of special important to any theist. For the passive believer the concept of whether or not we have free will may never cross their mind, but simply asking a few questions sheds light on why this issue is so very important. It is widely held by Christians that God is sovereign and man is responsible, and for most there is little to no thought about the subject. But for those who are not satisfied with surface level answers, this question has been wrestled with throughout history by Ministers and Theologians alike. But like most philosophical dilemmas there continues to be debate, due in part to the personal nature of the subject matter. One of the most famous defenses of Free Will and God’s Sovereignty comes from St. Augustine. In his discourse with Erodins, Augustine lays out his defense for how God’s foreknowledge and human freedom can both be held consistently. For the purposes of this paper we will look at each of Augustine’s arguments as they are presented, providing analysis and criticism as we move through the discourse. Once each argument has been thoroughly evaluated and properly judged, we will proceed to make an attempt at a final conclusion as to the validity and soundness of his arguments and whether this constitutes a defeat for either side of the argument.
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It would be beneficial for us to begin by expounding on what the problem with these two ideas, Gods foreknowledge and human freedom, are at odds and what the significance this problem has for those that believe in a sovereign God. For the sake of clarity and conciseness, we will limit this our analysis to the problems that are addressed within this work. Augustine begins his discussion with Erodins with what he perceives to be the
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This note was uploaded on 10/25/2009 for the course PHL 420 taught by Professor Hestevold during the Spring '09 term at Alabama.

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On Augustine - On Augustines view of the Will CWID:10476849...

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