Chapter 6

Chapter 6 - 1,4,6 receive information from the left eye 2,3,5 receive information from the right eye f CO-rich neurons in the V2 area consists of

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1,4,6 receive information from the left eye 2,3,5 receive information from the right eye 1,2 = magnocellular 3-6 = parvocellular Light layers = koniocelluar of CO-rich neurons in the V2 area consists of three types of stripes: thick, thin, and pale stripes. within the blobs are sensitive to color, and all of them are sensitive to low spatial frequencies. lob, neurons show sensitivity to orientation, movement, spatial frequency, and binocular disparity. Taken directly from Physiology of Behavior, 10 th edition by Neil Carlson Chapter 6: Vision Chapter 6 covers the topic of vision. The opening section introduces the topics of sensory processing and the anatomy of the primate visual system, including the anatomy of the eye, the photoreceptors within the retina, and the neural pathways that connect the retina to visual cortex. The second section of the vision chapter introduces the notion of receptive fields and describes the organization of the retinal receptive fields. The processing of color coding at the retina and the lateral geniculate is described. Negative afterimages are related to retinal ganglion cell activity. The third section of chapter 6 describes the role played by the striate cortex in processing of information related to orientation and movement, texture, and color. Spatial frequency analyses are discussed in relation to visual processing. The blindsight phenomenon is discussed as an example of how sensory processing can occur in the absence of conscious awareness. The final section of chapter 6 introduces the notion that visual processing may occur in two streams of analysis that involve the activity of multiple brain regions, some located within striate cortex and others situated within visual association cortex. The section covers the role of visual association cortex in the analysis of color, form, movement, and location. Sensory receptor - a specialized neuron that detects a particular category of physical events - Stimuli impinge on the receptors and, through various processes, alter their membrane potentials Sensory transduction – the process by which sensory stimuli are transduced into slow, graded receptor potentials Receptor potential – a slow, graded electrical potential produced by a receptor cell in response to a physical stimulus - Most receptors lack axons; a portion of their somatic membrane forms synapses with the dendrites of other neurons Eyes detect light as electromagnetic radiation with a wavelength between 380 and 760 nm - Hue – one of the perceptual dimensions of color; the dominant wavelength; color - Brightness – one of the perceptual dimensions of color; intensity - Saturation – one of the perceptual dimensions of color; purity
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- If all the radiation if of one wavelength, the perceived color is pure, or fully saturated - If the radiation contains all wavelengths, it produces no sensation of hue – it appears white Vergence movement – the cooperative movement of the eyes, which ensures that the image of an object
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This note was uploaded on 10/26/2009 for the course BEH 341 taught by Professor Caldwell during the Fall '09 term at MCPHS.

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Chapter 6 - 1,4,6 receive information from the left eye 2,3,5 receive information from the right eye f CO-rich neurons in the V2 area consists of

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