Federalism - The Federal Framework State and local...

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The Federal Framework State and local governments play such important roles in the lives of American citizens because the United States is a federal system in which other levels of government are assigned considerable responsibility. The enduring significance of state and local governments reflects the Founders' distrust of centralized power. I. How does a federal system differ from other forms of government? A federal system is one in which governmental powers are shared by the national and state governments, which remain separate sovereigns. A unitary system is one in which the national government is dominant over state governments. A confederation is a political system in which the state governments are dominant over the national government. II. How does federalism limit the power of the national government? The national government is given certain "expressed powers," which can be found in Article I, Section 8, of the Constitution. The seventeen expressed powers are enhanced by the implied powers, or the "necessary and proper" clause. Powers not granted to the national government are reserved to the states under the Tenth Amendment. Power reserved to the states is generally referred to as "police
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Federalism - The Federal Framework State and local...

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