Presidency - The Constitutional Basis of the Presidency The...

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The Constitutional Basis of the Presidency The framers of the Constitution, wanting "energy in the executive," provided for a single-headed office. However, with no explicit powers independent of Congress, the president is constitutionally little more than a chief clerk, whose main objective is to see that the laws, as enacted by Congress, are faithfully executed. Yet today, the presidency is the most important and powerful office in the American government. I. What were the conflicting views of the framers of the Constitution over presidential power? Article II of the Constitution provides for a small number of expressed powers for the office of president and is often called the "most loosely drawn chapter of the Constitution." Article II represents a compromise between the conflicting views of the framers over the nature of the office of the president. It appears that the framers intended the office to be one of delegated powers, since all of the powers of the national government are found in Article I, Section 8. However, inherent powers can be inferred from the vague and
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This note was uploaded on 10/26/2009 for the course POLISCI 50830 taught by Professor Stevens during the Spring '09 term at MATC Madison.

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Presidency - The Constitutional Basis of the Presidency The...

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