KerriYohePhiloEssay1

KerriYohePhiloEssay1 - Yohe1 Kerri Yohe Phil 2115 Divine...

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Yohe 1 Kerri Yohe Phil 2115 9/17/09 Divine Theory of Ethics Overall, what any of the Divine Theories of Ethics have in common is that they take a god or god’s commands as the foundation of ethical and moral beliefs. What a god says is ethical is ethical, and what a god says is unethical is unethical. To me, this conveys that a god or gods have no moral basis by which to make a decision of ethics. If a god had commanded that hate was a good virtue, then it would be so, and there could be no question about whether that was ethical, because it is only ethical because the god said it was. This could create a circle argument that could go on forever, questioning why a god said something was ethical, then why one should obey that god in the first place, if there was no moral basis for the command, etc (“Divine Command Theory”). Socrates questions this Divine Theory of Ethics first of all in the Euthyphro. He begins by questioning Euthyphro about what is ‘impious’. After several attempts at an explanation, Euthyphro comes to the final conclusion that what is pious is what is thought to be pious
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KerriYohePhiloEssay1 - Yohe1 Kerri Yohe Phil 2115 Divine...

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