211520U42011.1

211520U42011.1 - Music 2115 No Quiz for Today!!! Coming...

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Unformatted text preview: Music 2115 No Quiz for Today!!! Coming events: Com • Monday: Listening Quiz 7 on Chapter 11 (Options 2 & 3) • Wednesday: Terms Quiz 8 on Chapter 11) (Options 2 & 3) • Friday: Listening Quiz 8 on Chapter 12) (Options 2 & 3) • Sunday, October 27: Early Music Ensemble Concert, 3 pm, here, free! Reviews will count as “Early” with 10% bonus. Instrument of the day: Instrum • Called Vielle (France) (Fra – Medieval, through 15th cent. – Became viol, viola, vihuela • Called Fidel (Germany) – Became modern “fiddle” Be • Called Vihuela de arco (Spain) Called de – Vihuela de mano = Guitar Vihuela Guitar Next 3 Chapters • The “High Renaissance” = the extended Th 16th cent. • 3 different aspects – Chapter 11: Secular song – Chapter 12: Sacred music of the Reformation & Counter-Reformation – Chapter 13: Instrumental music. Pre-Madrigal Song in Italy • The “madrigal” was a poetic form used Th iin the 14th century by Petrarch & others n – 1st publication with music labeled “madrigals” 1525 • Before 1525 – Lauda – Canti carnascialeschi – Frottola. Lauda • Throughout Italy, but esp. popular in Florence (1480-1520) – Resurgence after Council of Trent (1560s) – Groups that met for devotions, monastaries, convents, religious plays • Characteristics – Non-liturgical sacred texts, mostly Italian – 2 & 3 part – Work of many poets & composers. Canti carnascialeschi • • • • • In Florence (1498-1520) For pre-Lent & post-Easter carnivals Most are strophic with a refrain 3 & 4 part Used in masquerades & triumphs Frottola • • • Widely popular (1500-1525) 25 collections printed, 11 by Petrucci 3 & 4 part, homorhythmic polyphony, real bass part • Strophic or strophic with refrain • Often only top voice texted, all on refrain • Two best-known composers – Marco Cara (1470-1525), Mantua “Oimè el Ma cuor” – Bartolomeo Tromboncino (1470-1535). Bartolomeo (1 The Italian Madrigal • Based on revival of interest & appreciation for the 14th century poetry of Petrarch c1500 c1500 • Considered serious songs, set to serious poetry • Usually a single stroph from a poem fro • Usually throughcomposed, phrase by phrase • A “Madrigal Cycle” set several strophes of the same poem. The 3 time periods in Madrigal The development • Early period madrigals: 1525-1545 • Classical period or “Golden Age”: 15451580 • Late period madrigals: 1580-1620. Early period madrigals (15251545) • Much like frottole, but to serious poetry fro • Some imitation, but mostly homorhythmic • First collection published 1530 • Composers to remember: – Philippe Verdelot (c1475-1535) (c1475-1535) – Costanzo Festa (c1480-1545) “Quando Costanzo ritrovo la mia pastorella” ritro la – Jacob Arcadelt (c1505-1568). (c1 Classical Period Madrigals (1545-1580) (1 • Netherlands polyphony applied to secular song • Modern poets imitating Petrarch’s style style • Composers to remember: – Adrian Willaert (Venice—Flemish) (Venice – Cipriano de Rore (Venice—Flemish) “Da le belle Cipriano de (Venice Flemish) contrada d’oriente” – Giaches de Wert (Mantua & Ferrara—Flemish) Giaches de “Non è sì denso velo” Non – Philippe de Monte (all over—Flemish). Late period madrigals (15801620) • • • • Native Italians took over Modern poets becoming more popular Experiments in chromaticism Composers to remember … . Composers Luca Marenzio (c15531599) • • • • Worked in Rome & Florence Singable by talented amateurs by Chromatic “Solo e pensoso”. pensoso Don Carlo Gesualdo (c1561(c1 1613) • • • Prince of Venosa Scandal Spent time at Ferrara, married into the family after killing his first wife • Extreme chromatic exploration • “Moro lasso”. Claudio Monteverdi (15671643) • Youngest of this group • Mastered the new techniques & surpassed them • Will study his work in Ch. 14. Luzzascho Luzzaschi (c1545(c 1607) • At Ferrara • Harpsichordist who sometimes wrote out his harpsichord parts. Music at the Italian Courts • Very important at the ruling North Italian courts • Ferrara (the d’Este family) Este family) • Mantua (the Gonzaga family) family) • Florence (the Medici family). Music at Ferrara • Concerto grande had 60 singers & instrumentalists • Concerto delle donne – First: aristocratic ladies of talent & skill – Second: professional female singers • Musica reservata or musica secreta musica • Intermedi between acts of a play between • Balletto delle donne—lady dancers. Lighter Italian Music Lighter • • • • Villanella (1530-1600) (1 Light & witty High class entertainment Presented as – Mascherata (masked scenes) (masked – Moresca (imitating Moors) (imita – Giustiniana (scene with 3 old men). (scene Lighter Italian Music Lighter • • • • Canzonetta (c1560-1605) Canzonetta (c1560-1605) Means “little song” Means Strophic Texts amorous, erotic, pastoral or satirical • Composers to remember: – Luca Marenzio – Orazio Vecchi. Lighter Italian Music Lighter • Balletto – – – – Means “little dance” Means Strophic, homorhythmic Verses end with “fa-las” Verses Spread to Germany & England with Musica Musica transalpina • Composer to remember: – Giovanni Gastoldi (c1552-1622) (c1552-1622) – In England, Thomas Morley. ...
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This note was uploaded on 10/27/2009 for the course MUS 2115 taught by Professor Jrhowell during the Fall '08 term at Virginia Tech.

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