1 Introduction PP - Tree of Life Animal Characteristics 1 Multicellular(not exclusive to animals 2 Consume Food(heterotrophic 3 Mobility(at some

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–20. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Background image of page 2
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Tree of Life
Background image of page 4
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Animal Characteristics: 1. Multicellular (not exclusive to animals) 2. Consume Food (heterotrophic) 3. Mobility (at some point in life) 3a. Muscles and Nerves 4. Exhibit embryonic development 4a. Hox genes present
Background image of page 6
1. Multicellular (eukaryotic)
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
2. Consume food.
Background image of page 8
3. Mobility (at some point in life)
Background image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Some cnidarians and other animals that lead mostly sessile lives at some point are free living (i.e. mobile)
Background image of page 10
Muscles and Nerves
Background image of page 11

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
REPRODUCTION: MOST animals reproduce with mobile sperm and large, nutrient-rich eggs.
Background image of page 12
4. Patterns of embryonic Development
Background image of page 13

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
FYI: “Stoma” = “hole”
Background image of page 14
4a. Hox genes
Background image of page 15

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Causation in Animal Behavior can be explored in at least 4 different ways Ernst Mayr 1904-2005 In 1961, Ernst Mayr proposed that animal behavior causation be examined on 2 different levels: Proximate and Ultimate
Background image of page 16
Proximate factors operate in the day-to-day lives of individuals. Ultimate factors encompass births and deaths of many generations or even entire taxa.
Background image of page 17

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Background image of page 18
PROXIMATE vs. ULTIMATE CAUSATION The immediate mechanism or “ how” a behavior is expressed is the proximate cause. Proximate causes may be
Background image of page 19

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 20
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 10/27/2009 for the course BIO 52200 taught by Professor Pollak during the Spring '09 term at University of Texas at Austin.

Page1 / 31

1 Introduction PP - Tree of Life Animal Characteristics 1 Multicellular(not exclusive to animals 2 Consume Food(heterotrophic 3 Mobility(at some

This preview shows document pages 1 - 20. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online