f08-Ch8-Anonymity - Anonymity 1 Anonymity Supreme Court...

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1 Anonymity
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2 Anonymity Supreme Court Justice Louis Brandeis defined privacy as "the right to be let alone", which he said was one of the rights most cherished by Americans. Who is talking to whom may be confidential or private: Who is searching a public database? Which companies are collaborating? Who are you talking to via e-mail? Where do you shop on-line? The Internet represents previously inconceivable opportunities to monitor your actions and personal information
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3 Opportunities for Exploitation Your computer’s IP address uniquely identifies you across web sites. Nothing illegal about cross-referencing. The goal of Internet anonymity: A host can communicate with an arbitrary server in such a manner that nobody can determine the host’s identity www.genetic-diseases.com www.insurance-online.com
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4 Anonymous Routing Anonymity is the state of being indistinguishable from other members of some group. Main goal is to provide mechanism for routing that hides initiator’s IP address Not trying to protect content of message. Can use end-to-end encryption for that. That said. .. Does not protect higher-level protocols/data. Doesn’t make sense to send “I’m Brian” anonymously.
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5 Anonymity Publisher Produces documents Provider (responder) Hosts and delivers documents upon requests Requester (initiator) Requests documents A provider and a publisher can be the same in some systems. A provider and a publisher can be different for some reasons: To resist censorship Document caching ……
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6 Anonymity Publisher anonymity Hide the identity of a publisher to resist censorship Responder/initiator anonymity Hide a responder or an initiator’s identity Mutual anonymity Hide a responder and an initiator’s identities
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7 Publisher Anonymity Freenet Each node in the response path may cache the reply locally, which can supply further requests and achieve publisher anonymity Janus/Rewebber a URL rewriting service Publius Split the symmetric key used to encrypt and decrypt a document into n shares using Shamir secret sharing and store the n shares on various hosts. FreeHaven Split a document into n shares and store them in multiple peers.
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8 FreeHaven (K d , K r , ReplyBlock) + + reader server broadcast Publishing server break a file into shares, generates a key pair to sign each share Reader locates a server to perform file request, generate a key pair, remailer The server broadcasts a request k or more shares arrived to destination will recreate the file.
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9 Initiator/Responder Anonymity Anonymizer Hide user’s identity and resent user’s request Mix
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This note was uploaded on 10/27/2009 for the course CSE 830 taught by Professor Ofria during the Fall '08 term at Michigan State University.

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f08-Ch8-Anonymity - Anonymity 1 Anonymity Supreme Court...

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