Lec08_AES - Advanced Encryption Standard (AES) Lecture 8...

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1 Prof. Ren 1 Advanced Encryption Standard (AES) Lecture 8 Prof. Ren 2 Background On January 2, 1997, NIST began the process of choosing a replacement for DES. The replacement would be called Advanced Encryption Standard, or AES. AES is required to have block length 128 bits, and supports key lengths of 128, 192 and 256 bits. AES should be available worldwide on a royalty-free basis. Submission deadline was June 15, 1998. 21 cryptosystems were submitted, 15 met the requirements.
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2 Prof. Ren 3 Background On August 20, 1998, NIST announced fifteen AES candidate algorithms at the First AES Candidate Conference (AES1). A Second AES Candidate Conference (AES2) was held in March 1999 to discuss the results of the analysis that was conducted by the international cryptographic community on the candidate algorithms. The selected algorithms were MARS, RC6, Rijndael, Serpent and Twofish. Rijndael was selected to be the AES on October 2, 2000 at the end of a very long and complex evaluation process. Rijndael was adopted on November 26, 2001. Prof. Ren 4 Background Rijndael was submitted by Joan Daemen (Proton World International) and Vincent Rijmen (Katholieke Universiteit Leuven) in Belgium. A substitution-linear transformation network with 10, 12 or 14 rounds, depending on the key size.
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3 Prof. Ren 5 AES Evaluation Criteria Security Actual security Randomness Soundness Other security factors Cost Licensing requirements Computational efficiency Memory requirements Algorithm and implementation characteristic Flexibility Hardware and software suitability Simplicity Prof. Ren 6 AES Parameters
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4 Prof. Ren 7 Finite Fields: Galois Fields Finite fields (Galois Fields) first studied by Galois. Given a prime p, the finite field of order p, denoted as GF(p) is defined as the set Z p of integers {0, 1, …, p -1}, together with addition and multiplication arithmetic operations modulo p. Z p is closed to addition and multiplication operations. For any a Z p /{0}, we can always find an element b Z p , such that a*b=1 mod p. Denote b=a -1 , called inverse of a. Evariste Galois: 25 Oct 1811~31 May 1832 Prof. Ren 8 Finite Fields: Motivation x 2 +1 R[x] is irreducible, where R is the real number field .
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This note was uploaded on 10/27/2009 for the course ECE 816 taught by Professor Ren during the Spring '09 term at Michigan State University.

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Lec08_AES - Advanced Encryption Standard (AES) Lecture 8...

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