Chapt10

010 0010 0010 002 0025 005 ft 00011 00019 00032 00080

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Unformatted text preview: 80 0.022 0.025 0.030 0.035 0.004 0.005 0.005 0.010 0.12 0.26 0.8 1.5 37 80 240 500 0.030 0.040 0.035 0.005 0.010 0.010 0.8 3 1.5 240 900 500 0.035 0.05 0.075 0.15 0.010 0.02 0.025 0.05 1.5 6 15 ? 500 2000 5000 ? *A more complete list is given in Ref. 3, pp. 110 – 113. Considering the uncertainty in n ( 17 percent), it would be more realistic to report this estimate as Q 600 100 ft3/s. An alternate estimate, using the Moody formula (10.15) with 0.0032 ft from Table 10.1, would give Q 540 ft3/s. Normal-Depth Estimates With water depth y known, the computation of Q in Example 10.1 was quite straightforward. However, if Q is given, the computation of the normal depth yn may require iteration or trial and error. Since the normal depth is a characteristic flow parameter, this is an important type of problem. EXAMPLE 10.2 | v v The asphalt-lined trapezoidal channel in Fig. E10.2 carries 300 ft3/s of water under uniform-flow conditions when S 0.0015. What is the normal depth yn? | e-Text Main Menu | Textbook Table o...
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This note was uploaded on 10/27/2009 for the course MAE 101a taught by Professor Sakar during the Spring '08 term at UCSD.

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