Ch. 13 - Notecards - He was the most influential of the...

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Unformatted text preview: He was the most influential of the Christian humanists. He wanted to reform the Catholic Church by restoring simplicity. His work paved the way for Martin Luther and Protestant reforms. However, he never intended to spit the Church. Erasmus was a prolific writer for his time and was heavily involved in translating the New Testament from Greek. These were certificates sold by the Catholic Church which promised that a Cardinal or other high-ranking official would pray for the soul of the recipient in order to reduce time in Purgatory. Martin Luther advocated the elimination of indulgences. Later, in the Catholic Reformation, the Catholic Church also stopped the selling of indulgences. This is the holding of many church offices. Church offices were most often held by nobles and the wealthier members of the bourgeoisie. The practice of pluralism led to absenteeism in which the officeholders neglected to fulfill their duties. Christian Humanists were from the area to the north of the Alps. These northern humanists were called Christian humanists because they were preoccupied with religion. Like their counterparts in the South, Christian Humanists cultivated knowledge of the classics and focused on the sources of the Holy Scriptures. The most important aspect of Christian Humanism was its program of reform. This is the belief that the bread and wine to be administered at Communion become, upon consecration, the actual body and blood of Jesus Christ, even though the external appearance of the bread and wine and their smell, remain the same. It is thus opposed to other doctrines, such as the Lutheran doctrine that the body and blood of Christ coexist in and with the bread and wine, which remain unchanged . This is the doctrine that one can achieve a state of grace by faith alone. Luther did not agree with the Catholic belief that grace required both faith and good works here on Earth. Luther thought that human beings did not possess sufficient power here on Earth to please God through good works. This judgment of the imperial diet of the Holy Roman Empire in Worms stated that Luthers beliefs were heresy and wrong. Accordingly, his works were to be burned and Luther captured. This forced Luther to depend on the German princes and people for his protection. Luthers defense of his beliefs in Worms became the battle cry of the Reformation. He was emperor of the Holy Roman Empire from 1519 to 1556. He was a devout Catholic who rejected Luthers beliefs. He hoped to preserve the unity of the Catholic faith throughout his empire which included much of Europe....
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Ch. 13 - Notecards - He was the most influential of the...

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