Ch. 14 - Notecards - He was Portuguese-born Spanish...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–9. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
He was Portuguese-born Spanish explorer and navigator, leader of the first expedition to circumnavigate, or sail completely around, the world. He was born in northern Portugal. Magellan set out to reach the East Indies by sailing westward from Europe, which no one was sure could be done. He intended to return by the same route, but after his death his crews found that the prevailing winds required them to keep sailing west, around the world.
Image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Hernando Cortez was a Spanish conquistador who first reached what is now Mexico in 1519. He conquered the main Aztec city, Tenochititlán, which was ruled by Montezuma. He was able to conquer the city with the help of 50,000 warriors from the state of Tlaxcala and small pox, a European disease to which the Aztecs had no immunity. After the fall of the city, Cortez dismantled the Aztec temples, pyramids, and palaces in order to build state buildings.
Image of page 2
These were French Calvinists, who comprised about 7% to 10% of the French population. The French kings were worried about the Huguenots perhaps because so much of the French nobility had converted to Calvinism. This made them a potential political threat to the monarchy, who persecuted the Huguenots.
Image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
She was married to Henry II of France, the queen of France from 1547 to 1559, and was the mother of the last three Valois kings of France. She was a major force in French politics during the 30 years of Roman Catholic-Huguenot wars and an instigator of the Massacre of Saint Bartholomew's Day.
Image of page 4
This was a massacre of Huguenots led by Henry of Guise during the wedding celebration of Henry of Navarre and the sister of Charles IX. The massacre was approved by the king and his mother, Catherine de’ Medici, because Henry of Guise convinced them that the Huguenots were planning a revolt and should be destroyed before they were able to gain power. Three thousand Huguenots were killed in Paris.
Image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
These were people who placed politics before religion and believed that no religious truth could justify civil war. Essentially, they believed that the state was more important than the Church. A perfect example of this is Queen Elizabeth of England.
Image of page 6
He was the Bourbon leader of Navarre. He was the son of Jeanne d’ Albret, the queen of Navarre, who had introduced Calvinism to her kingdom. Henry was the acknowledged leader of the Huguenots. He later becomes Henry IV of France.
Image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
This “war” was the fighting which continued after the Saint Bartholomew’s Day Massacre. After the massacre, the Huguenots rebuilt their strength. The radical Catholics supported their champion, Henry, Duke of Guise, to become king. Henry of Guise seized Paris in 1588 and made King Henry III his chief minister. Soon thereafter, Henry III had Henry of Guise assassinated. He then sided with Henry of Navarre. A Catholic monk assassinated Henry III because he was repulsed by the idea that the French King would align himself with a Protestant. This allowed Henry of Navarre to take the throne. He becomes Catholic.
Image of page 8
Image of page 9
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern