Ch. 15 - Notecards - This was the peace treaty between...

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This was the peace treaty between France and Spainsigned on November 7, 1659, that ended 24 years of warfare; it was signed on a neutral island in the Bidassoa River, near Hendaye, France. Spain gave up the region of Artois and parts of Flanders, Hainault, and Luxembourg; in the south, the cession of Roussillon made the Pyrenees the boundary between the two countries. The terms of the treaty also promised Marie Thérèse, daughter of King Philip IV of Spain, in marriage to Louis XIV of France.
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This was a political system in which there is no legal, customary, or moral limit on the government’s power. The term is generally applied to political systems ruled by a single dictator, but it can also be applied to seemingly democratic systems that grant sweeping powers to the legislature or executive. King Louis XIV was the greatest absolute monarch.
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Living from 1638 to 1715 and king of France from 1643 to1715, he was known as the Sun King and is seen as the greatest example of an absolute monarch. Louis, third monarch of the Bourbon family, ruled for 72 years, the longest reign in European history. Louis’s main achievements were expanding the effectiveness of the central government, increasing the boundaries of France to the north and east, and placing one of his grandsons on the throne of Spain. The economy suffered during the long years of war, taxes increased, and the countryside was left vulnerable to famines.
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This was a series of revolts against the French monarchy between 1648 and 1653, during the reign of King Louis XIV. Begun as a protest by the Parlement of Paris (the chief judicial body in France) and its supporters against the heavy taxation policies of the king's chief minister, Jules Cardinal Mazarin, the Fronde evolved into armed rebellion. Order was restored in March 1649 when government forces led by Louis II, Prince de Condé, stopped the rebellion and a compromise between the Parlement and the monarchy was arranged. Their unsuccessful venture marked the last rebellion of the French nobility against the monarchy and a strengthening of the royal power.
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Finance minister under Louis XIV, he built France’s wealth through mercantilism, exchanging exports for gold. He also encouraged industry, built roads, and built a navy. Most of his programs and his personal reputation were destroyed by Louis’ personal extravagances.
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He was an Italian cardinal who was successor to Cardinal Richelieu and tried to carry on his policies. He essentially ran the government until Louis XIV became of age. He built a government based on centralized power. He ruled during the Fronde. When Louis XIV took over from him, France already had a fairly strong government.
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These were the supporters of the king, interested in overthrowing the cardinal in order to secure their positions and increase their own power. They led the second Fronde.
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These were the supporters of the cardinal, consisting of the members of the Parliament of Paris. They led the first Fronde.
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This note was uploaded on 10/27/2009 for the course HISTORY HIST1120 taught by Professor Collins during the Fall '05 term at University of Tennessee.

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Ch. 15 - Notecards - This was the peace treaty between...

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