Ch. 20 - Notecards - The textile industry began to greatly...

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The textile industry began to greatly advance in the 1770s and 1780s with the creation of the modern factory. The industry progresses with a series of technological developments beginning with the flying shuttle, which sped the process of weaving on a loom. Further advancements came with James Hargreaves’ spinning jenny, Richard Arkwright’s water frame spinning machine, Samuel Crompton’s mule, and Edmund Cartwright’s power loom.
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Richard Arkwright (1732–1792) was a British inventor and manufacturer who, in 1769, patented the water frame spinning machine, a device for spinning cotton into thread. He also established cotton mills that were among the first to use machinery on a large scale.
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Edmund Cartwright (1743–1823) was English inventor and clergyman. He was the inventor of an imperfect power loom that, in 1785, became the parent of the modern loom. It was the first machine to make weaving wide cotton cloth practical. His other inventions included a wool-combing machine (1789), a machine for rope making (1792), and an engine (1797) that used alcohol as fuel.
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The process called puddling involved stirring molten pig iron in a reverbatory furnace until the decarburizing action of the air produced a loop of pure metal. Henry Cort revolutionized the British iron industry through his invention of the puddling process.
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James Watt (1736–1819) was the Scottish inventor who, while working at the Univ. of Glasgow, was asked to repair a model of Thomas Newcomen's steam engine. He devised improvements that resulted in a new type of engine which
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This note was uploaded on 10/27/2009 for the course HISTORY HIST1120 taught by Professor Collins during the Fall '05 term at University of Tennessee.

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Ch. 20 - Notecards - The textile industry began to greatly...

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