05-Methods - The Art and Science of An Introduction to...

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Unformatted text preview: The Art and Science of An Introduction to Computer Science ERIC S. ROBERTS Jav a Methods C H A P T E R 5 With method and logic one can accomplish anything. Agatha Christie, Poirot Investigates, 1924 5.1 A quick overview of methods 5.2 Writing your own methods 5.3 Mechanics of the method-calling process 5.4 Decomposition 5.5 Algorithmic methods A Quick Overview of Methods You have been working with methods ever since you wrote your first Java program in Chapter 2. The run method in every program is just one example. Most of the programs you have seen have used other methods as well, such as println and setColor . At the most basic level, a method is a sequence of statements that has been collected together and given a name. The name makes it possible to execute the statements much more easily; instead of copying out the entire list of statements, you can just provide the method name. The following terms are useful when learning about methods: Invoking a method using its name is known as calling that method. The caller can pass information to a method by using arguments . When a method completes its operation, it returns to its caller. A method can pass information to the caller by returning a result . Methods and Information Hiding One of the most important advantages of methods is that they make it possible for callers to ignore the inner workings of complex operations. When you use a method, it is more important to know what the method does than to understand exactly how it works. The underlying details are of interest only to the programmer who implements a method. Programmers who use a method as a tool can usually ignore the implementation altogether. The idea that callers should be insulated from the details of method operation is the principle of information hiding , which is one of the cornerstones of software engineering. Methods as Tools for Programmers Particularly when you are first learning about programming, it is important to keep in mind that methods are not the same as application programs, even though both provide a service that hides the underlying complexity involved in computation. The key difference is that an application program provides a service to a user, who is typically not a programmer but rather someone who happens to be sitting in front of the computer. By contrast, a method provides a service to a programmer, who is typically creating some kind of application. This distinction is particularly important when you are trying to understand how the applications-level concepts of input and output differ from the programmer-level concepts of arguments and results. Methods like readInt and println are used to communicate with the user and play no role in communicating information from one part of a program to another. Method Calls as Expressions Syntactically, method calls in Java are part of the expression framework. Methods that return a value can be used as terms...
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This note was uploaded on 10/27/2009 for the course COMP SCI 1MD3 taught by Professor Various during the Winter '07 term at McMaster University.

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05-Methods - The Art and Science of An Introduction to...

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