anatomylab10

anatomylab10 - Almost everyone is aware of the diagnostic...

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Unformatted text preview: Almost everyone is aware of the diagnostic importance 1 of the pulse. It reveals important information about the cardiovascular system, heart action, blood vessels, and circulation. W HERE HERE P P ULSE ULSE C C AN AN B B E F F ELT ELT The pulse can be felt wherever an artery lies near the surface and over a bone or other firm background. Some of the specific locations where the pulse point is most easily felt are listed below and shown in Figure. Radial artery-at wrist Temporal artery-in front of ear or above and to outer side of eye Common carotid artery-along anterior edge of sternocleidomastoid muscle at level of lower margin of thyroid cartilage Facial artery- at lower margin of lower jawbone on a line with corners of mouth and in groove in mandible about one third of way forward from angle Brachial artery-at bend of elbow along inner margin of biceps muscle Popliteal artery-behind the knee Posterior tibial artery-behind the medial malleolus (inner "ankle bone") Dorsalis pedis artery-on the dorsum (upper surface) of the foot There are six important pressure points that can be used to stop arterial bleeding: 1. Temporal artery-in front of ear 2. Facial artery-same place as pulse is taken 3. Common carotid artery-point where pulse is taken, with pressure back against spinal column 4. Subclavian artery-behind medial third of clavicle, 4....
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anatomylab10 - Almost everyone is aware of the diagnostic...

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