Clas 5 reading 3

Clas 5 reading 3 - IJACL chapter. transferred to a support...

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Unformatted text preview: IJACL chapter. transferred to a support for the y for union sup~ nd Aleuts, now - rell as monetary. onfinement in a rent, they Could. undertaking or for such racist, 1y group ofpeo-.I July17, 198 i [signed _ 1e BlaCkYoned : Insufficient Care Winfiel- I. Perhaps the greatest problems in the asseme centers and internment camps I were inadequate medical facilities and care. ancuee doctors and nurses and outside medical help were recruited to worh in camp hospitals, often with minimal equipment and supplies. One Caucasian nurse at Heart Mountain remembers making do with extremeb; limited facilities, “We made mustard plasters in wash basins to put on the chests of the little pneumonia patients, and for diarrhea we used the water that rice had been coohed in.” Soon after Mabel Ota was interned at Poston, Arizona, she gave birth to 'a daughter who ufi‘ered brain damage. Her account of the harrowing experience along with a description of her elderlydiabetic father’s decline in camp was published in 1.984 in And Justice for All , a compilation of oral histories. was born in San Diego. I went to Calexico Elementary School, Calexico unior High School, and graduated valedictorian from Calexico High chool; and then I went to UCLA. I went out to UCLA, but I couldn’t get n any of the dorms. They didn’t allow Orientals in any of the dorms at UCLA, and so I ended up staying at the YWCA in Boyle Heights and com- muted hack and forth all those years. I got married in April 1939, graduated arbor was attacked and they said it wasn’t convenient to have-japanese orking in that division, so I got transferred to thejefferson Branch Library or six weeks and then I was terminated. They didn’t give me a reason for it at I knew why. It was because I was japanese. My parents had written to me and asked my husband and me to come own to Calexico and help them sell the store, all the merchandise and so rth. We got permission to leave, and we went down there and helped my ther. We advertised a closing-out sale in a local paper, and we sold every- : V1.0 'IEHVW. 9.1120 JHQEDEHI'ISHI thing at nominal cost and at a great loss. We had to because we didn’t know what was going to happen to us or where we would be sent. It was really sort of unbelievable. You know, when you go to college you have very high ideals of democracy, and when you have your rights taken away, it is really a shock. I kept saying all along, we’re American citizens and the government couldn’t possibly put us into camps. I really didn’t believe it would happen until it did. But I didn’t become bitter. I guess we learn to roll with the punches. My parents were very stoic about it. You know, they never showed anger or hit- terness, so I guess we sort of adopted their attitude. I guess we thought we should still be loyal and show that we are loyal by obeying. It wasn’t any- thing that the Japanese Americans Citizens League said; it was just how we felt ourselves. In El Centro we found out that we were going to be evacuat- ed to Poston, and then they sent out a notice requesting Nisei or any Japanese Americans to volunteer to go first to help open up the camp. And so Fred and I volunteered. We thought that it would probably help us get out sooner if we showed that we would cooperate. We were already think- ing of getting out of there. They said we could go up in our own car, so I piled all kinds of things in that car. The young fellow who was a gasoline attendant in Hoytsville, who knew me because I got gas there and my family got gas there, had offered to buy our car. When we told him we had to go to Poston, he offered to drive us there. He drove us, and we had to stop at Blythe for lunch. When we went in the restaurant, they refused to serve us. He didn’t buy anything either. We thought that was awful and so we walked out of that restaurant, I remember. But there was kindness from some. Like this fellow, he drove us all the way to Poston and helped us unload, and then he paid us for the car in cash and he drove the car back. There was only one obstetrician in that camp often thousand people, at the beginning anyway. And many of the women there were in their child— bearing years like myself. Once a month I went in for a checkup. Then my husband, Fred, received this offer to leave to go to New York to become assistant manager of a cooperative. He left and the baby was supposed to come in May, so he said he would be back in time for the birth of the baby. But she came one month early, and when I went to the hospital, the nurse said the doctor had collapsed during the course of the previous day or night. He had delivered two babies and he had been on his feet all that time without help, so he collapsed and had gone back to the barracks to sleep. _ I was in this room by myself and the nurse would come and check me every once in a while. I had a very long labor, almost twenty—eight hours. The nurse who w and finally she sa' going to have to c doctor didn’t com then he informed the baby out beca- no anesthesiologi: They took me- the knife to cut m that clock. He rea all the time. So it looking at the ba when they were I and they rushed I didn’t get to see h moved. When I d- her head. where tl never grown. I’m convinced I’ve read a lot of J have hard labor as thing, it causes dé same time and he] couldn’t, and so ] dren start walkin couldn’t walk us behind in her dev She was born: “Oh, you can’t t. she’s at least six} New York. My father, wh: had desserts bee: sweets. He alwa) wheat bread. He fresh vegetables, ' at camp, the diet ever they could : think there were looked at it, and] 3 we didn’t know I. go to college you rour rights taken ican citizens and lly didn’t believe the punches. My wed anger or hit- ;s we thought we 1g. It wasn’t any- : was just how we ng to be evacuat- ing Nisei or any :p the camp. And hably help us get :re already think- kinds of things in 1 Hoytsville, who re, had offered to e offered to drive lunch. When we n’t buy anything 'that restaurant, I :llow, he drove us laid us for the car )usand people, at :re in their child- teckup. Then my ‘York to become was supposed to birth of the baby. )spital, the nurse previous day or 3 feet all that time .rracks to sleep. ne and check me :nty-eight hours. The nurse who was checking me would listen to the heartbeat of the baby, and finally she said the heartbeat was getting very, very faint and she was going to have to call the doctor. But you know, for twentyveight hours the doctor didn’t come to see me. So then the doctor came and checked me and then he informed me that, yes, they were going to have to use forceps to pull the baby out because they couldn’t perform an operation because there was no anesthesiologist in camp. So that was the way they were going to do it. They took me to the delivery room and gave me a local and I could see the knife to cut me. Then he used these huge forceps, and I kept watching that clock. He really had a hard time yanking her out, but I was conscious all the time. So it was really a horrible experience. And then I remember looking at the baby and saying, “Gee, I thought babies were bright red when they were born.” This one was very pale and she gave one faint cry and they rushed her to the incubator and said she was very weak. Then I didn’t get to see her for three days because they said she was too weak to be moved. When I did see her on the third day I noticed that she had scabs on her head where the forceps had been used. There’s One spot where hair has never grown. I’m convinced that she suffered permanent brain damage at birth, and I’ve read a lot of publications and medical books and they say that if you have hard labor and oxygen doesn’t get to the fetus for one minute or some- thing, it causes damage. There was another lady who had a baby about the same time and her baby started sitting up at six months or so. Well, my baby couldn’t, and so I could see that her development was behind. Other chil— dren start walking, say at around a year, and Madeline couldn’t walk. She couldn’t walk until she was twenty-two months, so I know she was way behind in her development. She was born in April. I wanted to join Fred, but the camp doctor said, “Oh, you can’t travel with her, she’s too weak. You’ll have to wait until she’s at least six months.“ So I waited until November and joined him in New York. My father, who was at Gila, was a diabetic and so in our family we never had desserts because diabetics are not'isupposed to have a lot of starch or sweets. He always limited himself to one bowl of rice and he had whole wheat bread. He had always raised all kinds of vegetables in the backyard, fresh vegetables, because they were so essential to his diet. When we lived at camp, the diet at the beginning was really terribleijust starches, what- ever they could ship in, and hardly any vegetables or fruits. One meal I think there were nothing but bread, potatoes, spaghetti, and macaroni. I looked at it, and I said, “My gosh, there’s nothing but starch.” I remember I VLO 'IHSVW 9.123 iuotagnsug there. We got to see] next day he said, “H his diabetes.” The I having breakfast, oatmeal, and it was full of those little black bugs, and I remember taking all those bugs out of that bowl and it made a black ring ; 5 around the bowl. l E The food, I’m sure was related to my father’s death, but you see, they given him a blood a1 E didn’t diagnose it correctly. They put him in the hospital. I got a letter from okay. The diabetes yr 1 F3 my mother who said, “He’s in the hospital, come quickly." I went back and test and the doctor a % she said, “They said it’s not diabetes.” And so Iwent to the hospital to see and he accepted it. I E, him and they said he’s suffering from melancholia. And they said we have certificate definitely a- no way of treating him here, but we can arrange for him to go to the Phoenix coma, that’s what it ' a Sanitarium, Where he can get shock treatment, and maybe he’ll come out of he would have lived E it. But they said, it will be at your own expense, because they didn’t have his diet. The person any money to do that. We had some money from the sale of the grocery Ithink the goverr store, and so my mother said, “Well, let’s go there.” painful subject, I dc The sanitarium was outside of Phoenix, and my father was there and thng won’t happen was given shock treatments, but be was only there for about six weeks and of things that happc then the doctor called the camp and said, “Come, your father is going to myself loyal all thro pass away.” We went back and he passed away a short time after we arrived American citizen co Maybe I should fee because if the evacu wouldn’t have occu punches, and I alwaj Transfering the infirm was a complicated matter. Arrival at Heart Mountain from ’I‘ule Lake, September 1943. Photograph by Bud Aoyarna. bugs, and I 1 black ring )u see, they 1 letter from at back and spital to see aid we have the Phoenix come out of didn’t have the grocery is there and x weeks and r is going to :r we arrived there. We got to see him before he died; and when I talked to the doctor the next day he said, “He didn’t really have melancholia. It was brought on by his diabetes.” The camp had only given him a urine test. They had not given him a blood analysis test, you see, and the urine test would come out okay. The diabetes wouldn’t show up, but they had never given him a blood test and the doctor assumed that the camp had made the correct diagnosis, and he accepted it. So he went through all that for nothing. But his death certificate definitely says, “Died from diabetes,” so he went into a diabetic coma, that’s what it was, and then he died. If he didn’t go to camp I’m sure he would have lived to a ripe old age because he was very careful watching his diet. The person himselfhas to do it, and he was always very careful. I think the government was very wrong. This is why, although it is a very painful subject, I decided that I need to tell my story so that this kind of thing won’t happen again. If people don’t tell, no one will know the kinds of things that happened to loyal American citizens. I always considered myself loyal all through those years, and so it was a real shock that a loyal American citizen could be incarcerated like that and treated like a criminal. Maybe I should feel some anger or bitterness towards the government, because if the evacuation had not happened, then the tragedies in my life wouldn’t have occurred. But, you know, you always have to roll with the punches, and I always look on the good side too. 5 VLO 'IEIHVN 9.1123 Juatognsul ...
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This note was uploaded on 10/28/2009 for the course APA 200 taught by Professor Musikawong during the Fall '07 term at ASU.

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Clas 5 reading 3 - IJACL chapter. transferred to a support...

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