A quick iptables Tutorial

A quick iptables Tutorial - A quick iptables Tutorial By...

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Unformatted text preview: A quick iptables Tutorial By Dijiang Huang February, 2009 1. iptables basics What is iptables: Iptables is in short a Linux based packet filtering firewall. Iptables interfaces to the Linux netfilter module to perform filtering of network packets. This can be to deny/allow traffic filter or perform Network Address Translation (NAT). With careful configuration iptables can be a very cost effective, powerful and flexible firewall or gateway solution. Iptables is available from http://www.netfilter.org/ or via your Linux distribution. 1.1 iptables terms and syntax Drop/Deny - When a packet is dropped or denied, it is simply deleted, and no further actions are taken. No reply to tell the host it was dropped, nor is the receiving host of the packet notified in any way. The packet simply disappears. Reject - This is basically the same as a drop or deny target or policy, except that we also send a reply to the host sending the packet that was dropped. The reply may be specified, or automatically calculated to some value. (To this date, there is unfortunately no iptables functionality to also send a packet notifying the receiving host of the rejected packet what happened (i.e., doing the reverse of the Reject target). This would be very good in certain circumstances, since the receiving host has no ability to stop Denial of Service attacks from happening.) State - A specific state of a packet in comparison to a whole stream of packets. For example, if the packet is the first that the firewall sees or knows about, it is considered new (the SYN packet in a TCP connection), or if it is part of an already established connection that the firewall knows about, it is considered to be established. States are known through the connection tracking system, which keeps track of all the sessions. Chain - A chain contains a ruleset of rules that are applied on packets that traverses the chain. Each chain has a specific purpose (e.g., which table it is connected to, which specifies what this chain is able to do), as well as a specific application area (e.g., only forwarded packets, or only packets destined for this host). Table - Each table has a specific purpose, and in iptables there are 4 tables. The raw, nat, mangle and filter tables. For example, the filter table is specifically designed to filter packets, while the nat table is specifically designed to NAT (Network Address Translation) packets. Match - This word can have two different meanings when it comes to IP filtering. The first meaning would be a single match that tells a rule that this header must contain this and this information. For example, the --source match tells us that the source address must be a specific network range or host address. The second meaning is if a whole rule is a match. If the packet matches the whole rule, the jump or target instructions will be carried out (e.g., the packet will be dropped.) Target - There is generally a target set for each rule in a ruleset. If the rule has Target - There is generally a target set for each rule in a ruleset....
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This note was uploaded on 10/28/2009 for the course CSE 598 taught by Professor Huang during the Fall '09 term at University of Arizona- Tucson.

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A quick iptables Tutorial - A quick iptables Tutorial By...

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