C142_Lec14_Temp_Au-02 - Lecture #14 The Ideal Gas Law and...

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The Ideal Gas Law and Stoichiometry Chemistry 142 B Autumn Quarter, 2004 J. B. Callis, Instructor Lecture #14
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Ideal Gas Law An ideal gas is defined as one for which both the volume of molecules and forces between the molecules are so small that they have no effect on the behavior of the gas. The ideal gas equation is: PV=nRT R = Ideal gas constant = 8.314 J / mol K = 8.314 J mol -1 K -1 R = 0.08206 L atm mol -1 K -1
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The Ideal Gas Law Subsumes the Other Gas Laws During chemical and physical processes, any of the four variables in the ideal gas equation may be fixed. Thus, PV=nRT can be rearranged for the fixed variables: for a fixed amount at constant temperature PV = nRT = constant Boyle’s Law for a fixed amount at constant volume P/T = nR/V = constant Amonton’s Law for a fixed amount at constant pressure V/T = nR/P = constant Charles’s Law for a fixed volume and temperature P/n = RT/V = constant Avogadro’s Law
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Many gas law problems involve a change of conditions, with no change in the amount of gas . = constant Therefore, for a change of conditions : T 1 T 2 P x V T P 1 x V 1 = P 2 x V 2
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Problem 14-1: Change of Three Variables - I A gas sample in the laboratory has a volume of 45.9 L at 25 o C and a pressure of 743 mm Hg. If the temperature is increased to 155 o C by compressing the gas to a new volume of 31.0 L what is the pressure? P 1 = P 2 = V 1 = V 2 = T 1 = T 2 =
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Problem 14-1: Change of Three Variables - II = T 1 T 2 P 1 x V 1 P 2 x V 2 = P 2 =
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Problem: Calculate the pressure in a container whose Volume is 87.5 L and it is filled with 5.038kg of Xenon at a temperature of 18.8 o C. Plan:
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This note was uploaded on 10/28/2009 for the course CH 53130 taught by Professor Mccord during the Fall '09 term at University of Texas at Austin.

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C142_Lec14_Temp_Au-02 - Lecture #14 The Ideal Gas Law and...

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