culture and perception paper- final draft copy.docx - Running head CULTURE AND PERCEPTION PAPER FINAL DRAFT Culture and Perception Paper \u2013 Final Draft

culture and perception paper- final draft copy.docx -...

This preview shows page 1 - 3 out of 7 pages.

Running head: CULTURE AND PERCEPTION PAPER- FINAL DRAFT Culture and Perception Paper – Final Draft name Grand Canyon University: COM-263 date Professor 1
Image of page 1
CULTURE AND PERCEPTION PAPER – FINAL DRAFT Culture and Perception Paper - Rough Draft Culture is defined as social behavior, beliefs, and values that are passed down in a particular social group from generation to generation. Culture can include anything from patterns of communication, beliefs, language culture, pastimes, literature, social systems, behaviors, etc. (Neuliep, 2017). Nationalities within the US have become remarkably complex, more than ever before. Different cultures hold different religions, values, attitudes, and mindsets. Amid change and diversity societies will not agree and become polarized. Essentially, how society treats minorities reflects our individualistic ideology. Mass media has played a significant role in today's society. One of the most established benefits is how societies are portrayed in the media itself. “Ethnocentrism is when one's community assumes that it is the most important and has a greater purpose than any other culture” (Neuliep, 2017). The impression that the United States has of Mexico, which is generally a well-known and valued country, is a clear illustration of this. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the different ways in which Mexican culture's identity is represented, compare the symbolic representation of Mexican culture in its media with that of the U.S. media, and address the effect of mass media on intercultural perceptions and interactions As stated previously, cultural identity Culture can include anything from patterns of communication, beliefs, language culture, pastimes, literature, social systems, behaviors, etc. Mexico’s cultural identity can be assessed with Hofstede’s cultural dimensions. Mexican cultures rank relatively high in masculinity, power distance, and uncertainty avoidance. “In cultures with high power distance, such as Mexico, employees rely on a strong hierarchal structure with those in power demonstrating care and concern for subordinates” (Schuler & Jackson, 1996). Mexican culture is also known for its high masculinity rate. Which indicates that the value of male dominance. The men are meant to protect and provide their families. In comparison to any other 2
Image of page 2
Image of page 3

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture