Chase Zarate, GCU SPD 510_ Determining the Least Restrictive Environment.pdf

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Running head: LRE 1 Determining the Least Restrictive Environment Chase Zarate Grand Canyon University: SPD 510 Prof. Mary Capen February 26, 2020
2 LRE Least Restrictive Environment (LRE) Placement Settings Placement Setting Student and Staff Sizes Benefits Restrictions Inclusion Classrooms - In 2016, 94.9% of special education students spent some portion of their day in general education classes (Alvernia University, 2019) - One general education teacher, with paraeducators and classroom aides when necessary - Peers in classroom can vary from 20-30 general education students - Modern research has proven that when special needs students are placed in traditional classes alongside general education peers, their academic success improves (Alvernia University, 2019) - Schools with inclusion classrooms found that disabled students had higher school satisfaction and had a better sense of belonging (Alvernia University, 2019) - “There is little federal guidance on whether schools can consider students’ classmates and teachers in their decisions about where students with disabilities are educated, which complicates placement judgments” (Gilmour, 2018) - “Students with disabilities have a higher probability of exhibiting challenging behavior than their peers without disabilities” in inclusive classrooms (Gilmour, 2018) Resource Classrooms - Resource rooms have “almost always a maximum ratio of five students to one teacher, and students often find themselves working with a teacher or paraeducator one on one” (Watson, 2019) - Many resource rooms “support the social needs of their students, as the small group setting is less threatening, and students who sometimes fall on the outskirts of the general education classes are more willing to step out of their comfort zones” (Watson, 2019) - Resource rooms “more readily provide opportunities for behavior interventions, and teachers frequently coach students on their social skills, often by helping them take on leadership roles” (Watson, 2019) - Resource rooms can become “a waste of time if the special educator does not invest their time reading and practicing current research and learning best practice for instruction, while honing their crafts” (Hill, 2014). - Therefore, resource classrooms positive impact on special needs students can sometimes be reliant on the special educator running the classroom Self-Contained - Classrooms - Self-contained-classrooms offer “smaller groups, a more close-knit environment, and one-on-one attention” (Dalien, 2016) - Classroom sizes “typically consist of 5 to 10 students and are run by a special education teacher and paraeducator, who take instruction from the primary teacher” (Dalien, 2016) - For special needs students who do not find success in inclusion or resource classrooms, self-contained-classrooms “provide support and structure for children whose educational needs are not my by a general education, and is a great choice for schools with a special education program” (Dalien, 2016) - Self-contained-classrooms may not be provided at the nearest school: “a student with a disability who requires a self-contained-classroom

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