StandingWaves#8 - waves. 6. So the 1 st experiment again...

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Gordon Chen PHY133 – L05 11/20/08 Standing Waves This experiment studies the characteristics of waves especially standing waves. Some components of a standing wave include nodes and anti – nodes. Equations: Procedure: 1. Place masses on the end of the rubber band that is hanging off the end of the table. 2. Measure the length of the rubber band form the motor to the pulley. 3. Start up the motor and turn the power supply knob until one oscillating wave appears at its maximum amplitude. 4. Start up the precision timer on the computer so that the time can be recorded. 5. Repeat the previous 2 steps 4 more times so that you get 5 oscillating
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Unformatted text preview: waves. 6. So the 1 st experiment again but with a short distance from the motor to the pulley. 7. Now do the same experiment as before except the masses pulling on the pulley is lessened. 8. Calculate the frequency using the times that were recorded. Results: Questions: 1. The longer the rubber band is, the more power is needed to make the waves. Conclusion: At a longer L, the power supplier had to work much harder to get the rubber to band to wave. The amplitudes of the long rubber band waves are greater because there is more room to move. The frequency of the waves is greater when there are more nodes....
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StandingWaves#8 - waves. 6. So the 1 st experiment again...

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