lecture13

lecture13 - Lecture Outline Binary or Antipodal Signaling...

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Binary or Antipodal Signaling Reading: Textbook section 7.1 and 7.2. Material covered: 1. PAM and PPM transmission Recall: PAM uses multiple levels of amplitude to encode info, -∞ = - = n n nT t h a t y ) ( ) ( where } 3 , , , 3 { A A A A a n + + - - for 4-PAM. Recall: PPM uses shifted position of a pulse within T to encode info. We can generalize M -ary modulation where we have M different symbols being transmitted. Let: PAM PPM Let the symbol 1 be represented by ) ( 1 t s Let the symbol 2 be represented by ) ( 2 t s Let the symbol M be represented by ) ( t s M Symbols are transmitted consecutively and independently every T. Consider transmission of one symbol, say ) ( t s , which can be any of the symbols. Channel adds noise so that received signal is ) ( ) ( ) ( t n t s t r + = Often noise is assumed to be Additive White Gaussian Noise (AWGN) with power spectral density 2 ) ( 0 N f S n = . Question: At the receiver, how do we decide what symbol was sent, given corruption
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lecture13 - Lecture Outline Binary or Antipodal Signaling...

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