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04CHM114_04_126

04CHM114_04_126 - CHEM 114A Spring 2004 Monday Jan 26th...

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Unformatted text preview: CHEM 114A Spring 2004 Monday Jan. 26th 2004 Lecture No. 3 website www.public.asu.edu/~caangell Chapter 2. Section 3. Atomic substructure (“modern view”. Atoms mostly empty space..heavy nucleus at center consists of protons (+) and neutrons (neutral) — equal in mass - and electrons sufficient to neutralize the positive charge. Electrons fill out the volume of the atom in some way that we will try to understand later. “'3 If I n(p+) '3 n(e‘) then it is a neutral atom. If the n(p+) i n(e‘) then we have an ION of that element. E.g. atom of sodium Na has 11p+, 12n and 11e‘ but a sodium ion (responsible for electric current through water in last week’s demo) only has lOe". We write Nah Stable isotopes and radioactive ones. The element is defined by the n(p+) It determines the chemistry that the atom will undergo the atomic weight of the element is determined by the sum of protons and neutrons. Usually n(p+) z n(n). We write 1122Na 612C 613C (radioactive) Superscript is the mass no., subscript is atomic no. Others: ‘10 u. u N' h; Mu: Stable combinations of p+ + n..rnore than just one. Usually one dominates, so AW approximately whole number. But chlorine 1735Cl 1737C1 in comparable props, so AW is 35.5 THE PERIODIC TABLE Law of octaves etc Then Mendele’ev, Russia, arranging by mass and chemical similarity. Predictions of missing elements (germanium) Metals, metalloids, and non—metals (includes gases) _—= ' (I ' [M #4.. Metals: C M.“ m g Q. and-Ir: 0 fight“. C“, Metalloid properties... \ H04" ‘ Slum ( chem-lulu” ‘ Mud: Non-metal properties. . ‘ .1304“. M§l¢ «.tu lsqu t a: 61" ‘0‘ . The periodic groups (columns) have names S \I ‘ 1. alkali metals , “F” N: ‘4' "M" 1‘ fl 2. alkaline earth metals u“- 3.halo ens :‘CJ- ‘ ar‘ 1 4. chalcogenides Sp) 5 ‘ Sc. ‘ To... then 5 transition metals m h . 6. rare earth stransition metals) "4. 7. actinides Molecules — chemical blocks. (section 2.5) Molecules vs giant molecules (metalloids) vs metals 1. Elements H .5 o & F‘. )1 g“ The different gaseous forms of oxygen 0 $ ‘ O 3 d a Psete'm e e «1 — fitefi o_ on“: m. g\3° tubers Iv“ ° F39“ EN'- 2. hing gaseous molecules, and molecular liquids and solids. names C02, NH3, HCl - covalent bonds single bonds and double bonds and triple bonds bland-‘0', ‘. 'l'w- ‘hmlafil (h fin-0|, Hc‘a M01...“ CLler-tfi CO Cab-when mos—um}... Naming binary compounds (all sorts) wrl‘l‘g dawn. full 055nm; .1. We 0‘ Mg“! "FummSl' *5 "41‘ or- P-T. “'3‘ m MM"I+ HE. and um.“ we“ —:d« 6.4- h and Ionic vs molecular and prefixes . Q e. l , s ° d ‘ w m ,. L a Y ‘A‘ Q Aeolian“ 5‘ 5m...“ ¢°Mecu~te unfl- Hbfi-Mtffia .ut NEED To ‘ Shaft-f NUMCCOI Grunt E I'Mrl‘nf' __ Chemical formulae vs empirical formulae. N o 1' In} I: Finding an empirical formula from a chemical analysis. a (“31'- r. 9‘“ Benzene. Shape of molecule, 7.6% H, 92,4%C f' 0“ 0". T-67 The Crystal Structure of Sodium Chloride Figure 8.3 “9+” (Spuc‘wmemfl 'E 2003 I25. Prerice-dal- Inc. A DIVISIQI': ol Searson ECLL‘QIIUH 2' age 31-41.“ New Jersey- 0358 M6“ OI.- "‘ man: s 80 Figure 11-19 POL‘iMECixATnN 6'? SLMOLEWLfS i 1 IJCIT-H'E‘Hflfl arm: 0? SLIFU'I. ATDMS charms-rin- tr- h-ry fink-II cl rho-bk fill-2 “a bald I50" I“ i-p-vu (AH—I. LII-I sigh-I—hn ring spun-I and join wiu «In-r Ira-Inn! rial! n In. gulf-nude pint]: "Hat with}. “(a III: ’1‘” I: rush-41. ru- Imtn. k nicelynvem Bock lo the quir. I'qul. Ova-QM“ of poly-RH: null-r In unla- h lhfitfll an page ?L ...
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