CL.10 - United States v. Lee A member of the Old Order...

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United States v. Lee A member of the Old Order Amish, is a farmer and carpenter Failed to file quarterly social security tax returns required of employers Claiming that imposition of the social security taxes violated his First Amendment free exercise rights and those of his Amish employees, religiously opposed to the national social security system He sued the state for the money he did pay back Burger Social Security is important and only exempted if Congress says so, it didn’t give the exemption to an Amish person’s employees and Lee is wrong State interest overrides Says that broad public interest is more important sometimes Stevens It must be the objector that has the burden of showing they should be exempted from the law Restriction is positive, exemption is negative for law In view of the fact that the Amish have demonstrated their capacity to care for their own, the social cost of eliminating this relatively small group of dedicated believers would be minimal Heffron v. International Society for Krishna Consciousness Issues with 1 st and 14 th Amendment, free exercise case Dealing with if they can sell religious stuff at state fairs Minnesota Agricultural Society (Society), a public corporation organized under the laws
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This note was uploaded on 11/02/2009 for the course POLITICS CIVIL LIBE taught by Professor Kahn during the Spring '08 term at NYU.

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CL.10 - United States v. Lee A member of the Old Order...

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