CSIFBI2007 - The 12th Annual Computer Crime and Security...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
The 12th Annual Computer Crime and Security Survey GoCSI.com
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
For the past five years, this survey—perhaps the most widely quoted set of statistics in the industry—has shown a drop in average estimated losses due to cyber- crime. This year, however, the tide has turned and re- spondents have reported a significant upswing. Because this is the longest-running survey in the information security field, it’s possible to see that losses climbed steadily before the loss numbers began to fall in 2002. The losses at their peak were still dramati- cally higher than they are this year. The drop from that peak came as a surprise to many and indeed no small amount of reflection has been invested in sorting out just how it could be that security practitioners thought they were losing less and less money. There are, no doubt, many causes, but there were several surveys and studies not done by CSI where one could see drops both in the frequency and the cost of many different types of cybercrime. At least within the enterprise, most respondents to this survey over the years thought their better security performance was real enough (though, of course, a number of orga- nizations continued to suffer catastrophic attacks and data breaches). A drop in losses was welcome evidence that the efforts put into cyber security were showing some return on investment. At the same time, there was rea- son to believe that the downward trend couldn’t con- tinue indefinitely. A number of developments within the criminal world persuaded many knowledgeable observers that it was inevitable that the gains made would be given up with the arrival of newer, more in- sidious threats. Though it’s wrong to project a trend from a single year’s results, and particularly from an informal survey such as this one, there is nevertheless a strong sug- gestion in this year’s results that mounting threats are beginning to materialize as mounting losses. This year’s survey results are based on the responses of 494 computer security practitioners in U.S. corpo- rations, government agencies, financial institutions, medical institutions and universities. This is the 12th year of the survey. In previ- ous years, the survey was titled the CSI/FBI survey, but although our colleagues within the Bureau have continued to provide insight and opinion regarding the survey, the “FBI” nomenclature has been discon- tinued and the survey is now entirely administered by CSI. We anticipate that this will give us more flexibility in the use and direction of our research efforts. © 2007 by Computer Security Institute. All rights reserved. 1 2007 CSI COMPUTER CRIME AND SECURITY SURVEY by Robert Richardson Director, Computer Security Institute
Background image of page 2
Some of the key findings from the participants in this year’s survey are summarized below: The average annual loss reported in this year’s survey shot up to $350,424 from $168,000 the previous year. Not since the 2004 report have average losses been this high.
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 11/02/2009 for the course SIS 2150 taught by Professor Joshi during the Spring '09 term at Philadelphia.

Page1 / 30

CSIFBI2007 - The 12th Annual Computer Crime and Security...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online