Chapter_24 - Chapte 24. Ele r ctric Pote ntial 24.1. What...

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Chapter 24. Electric Potential 24.1. What is Physics? 24.2. Electric Potential Energy 24.3. Electric Potential 24.4. Equipotential Surfaces 24.5. Calculating the Potential from the Field 24.6. Potential Due to a Point Charge 24.7. Potential Due to a Group of Point Charges 24.8. Potential Due to an Electric Dipole 24.9. Potential Due to a Continuous Charge Distribution 24.10. Calculating the Field from the Potential 24.11. Electric Potential Energy of a System of Point Charges 24.12. Potential of a Charged Isolated Conductor
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What is Physics? Gravitational force: F=Gm 1 m 2 /r 2 Electrostatic force: F=Gq 1 q 2 /r 2 One thing is in common: both of these forces are conservative
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Electric Potential Energy Gravitational force Electrostatic force Note: Electric energy is one type of energy.
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Reference Point of Electric Potential Energy The reference point can be anywhere. For convenience, we usually set charged particles to be infinitely separated from one another to be zero potential energy The potential energy U of the system at any point f is where W is the work done by the electric field on a charged particle as that particle moves in from infinity to point f.
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Example 1 A proton, located at point A in an electric field, has an electric potential energy of U A = 3.20 × 10 -19 J. The proton experiences an average electric force of 0.80 × 10 -9 N, directed to the right. The proton then moves to point B, which is a distance of 1.00 × 10 -10 m to the right of point A. What is the electric potential energy of the proton at point B ?
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Electric Potential The electric potential V at a given point is the electric potential energy U of a small test charge q 0 situated at that point divided by the charge itself: SI Unit of Electric Potential: joule/coulomb=volt (V) Note: Both the electric potential energy U and the electric potential V are scalars. The electric potential energy U and the electric potential V are not the same. The electric potential energy is associated with a test charge, while electric potential is the property of the electric field and does not depend on the test charge. If we set at infinity as our reference potential energy,
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The Electric Potential Difference The electric potential difference between any two points i and f in an electric field. Note: Only the differences Δ V and Δ U are measurable in terms of the work W. The is Δ V property of the electric field and has nothing to do with a test charge The common name for electric potential difference is "voltage". It is equal to the difference in potential energy per unit charge between the two points. the negative work done by the electric field on a unite charge as that particle moves in from point i to point f.
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Notes Continue Electric field always points from higher electric potential to lower electric potential. A positive charge accelerates from a
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This note was uploaded on 11/02/2009 for the course MASTERING PHYS taught by Professor All during the Spring '09 term at Kettering.

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Chapter_24 - Chapte 24. Ele r ctric Pote ntial 24.1. What...

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