Lect05 - PHYS 172: Modern Mechanics Fall 2009 Lecture 5...

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Fall 2009 PHYS 172: Modern Mechanics Lecture 5 – Fundamental Forces Read 3.1 – 3.8
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Announcements: • All iClickers should be registered in CHIP by now or very soon. • Exam 1 is already next week (8:00 pm Tue Sep 15th in Elliott Hall). Will cover chapter 1-3. • Students approved for separate accommodations should notify their instructor in advance (by email) Alternate testing center at the same time in room 242 in Phys. Building.
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CLICKER QUESTION #1 Reading Question (Sections 3.1 – 3.8) (This is a closed-book quiz, no consulting with neighbors, etc.) Which of the following is true? A. gravitational force between two objects is proportional to the sum of their masses B. electric forces are always attractive C. the spring force is in general a constant force D. iteratively predicting motion is pretty accurate for any time step E. gravitational force between two objects is always proportional to the product of the masses.
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Today’s Lecture • Fundamental forces ( Gravity specifically) • “Composite” Forces ( Spring force) • Introduce Iterative Prediction of Motion
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The Four Fundamental Forces Composite forces like the spring force, air drag, friction, etc. are combinations of these four fundamental forces (gravity and the electric force primarily).
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Newton’s Great Insight: The force that attracts things toward the earth (e.g. a falling apple) is the same force that keeps planets orbiting about the sun Question: Why doesn’t the Moon fall into the Earth?
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Lect05 - PHYS 172: Modern Mechanics Fall 2009 Lecture 5...

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