College of Engineering Announcement 2009-10

College of Engineering Announcement 2009-10 - 2009-2010...

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Unformatted text preview: 2009-2010 announcement College of Engineering A Guide to Undergraduate and Graduate Study coe.berkeley.edu University of California, Berkeley Educating Leaders. Creating Knowledge. Serving Society. K—%100 K—%45 Academic Calendar 2009-10 Fall Semester 2009 Tele-BEARS Begins Fee Payment Due Fall Semester Begins Welcome Events Instruction Begins Labor Day Holiday Veterans Day Holiday Thanksgiving Holiday Instruction Ends Final Examinations Fall Semester Ends Winter Holiday New Year’s Holiday Tele-BEARS Begins Spring Semester Begins Fee Payment Due Martin Luther King Jr. Holiday Instruction Begins Presidents’ Day Holiday Spring Recess César Chávez Holiday Cal Day Instruction Ends Final Examinations Spring Semester Ends Tele-BEARS Begins First Six-Week Session Memorial Day Holiday Ten-Week Session Eight-Week Session Independence Day Holiday Second Six-Week Session Three-Week Session April 13 August 15 August 20 August 24-28 August 26 September 7 November 11 November 26-27 December 9 December 12-19 December 19 December 24-25 December 31-January 1, 2010 October 19, 2009 January 12 January 15 January 18 January 19 February 15 March 22-26 March 26 April 17 May 10 May 13-20 May 20 February 1 May 24-July 2 May 31 June 7-August 13 June 21-August 13 July 5 July 6-August 13 July 26-August 13 Monday Saturday Thursday Monday-Friday Wednesday Monday Wednesday Thursday-Friday Wednesday Saturday-Saturday Saturday Thursday-Friday Thursday-Friday Monday Tuesday Friday Monday Tuesday Monday Monday-Friday Friday Saturday Monday Thursday-Thursday Thursday Monday Monday-Friday Monday Monday-Friday Monday-Friday Monday Tuesday-Friday Monday-Friday Spring Semester 2010 Summer Sessions 2010 Contents Contents Introduction From the Dean About the College of Engineering Choosing Engineering Engineering: The Berkeley Equation When in Berkeley Activities and Support Services Academic Enrichment Opportunities Center for Underrepresented Engineering Students Alumni and Support for the College Undergraduate Programs Graduate Programs Bioengineering Civil and Environmental Engineering Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences Engineering Science –Computational Engineering Science –Engineering Mathematics and Statistics –Engineering Physics –Environmental Engineering Science Engineering – Undeclared Industrial Engineering and Operations Research Manufacturing Engineering Materials Science and Engineering Mechanical Engineering Nuclear Engineering Joint Majors Introduction Bioengineering and Materials Science and Engineering Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences and Materials Science and Engineering Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences and Nuclear Engineering Materials Science and Engineering and Mechanical Engineering Materials Science and Engineering and Nuclear Engineering Mechanical Engineering and Nuclear Engineering Applied Science and Technology Graduate Group Technology and Leadership Studies Nanoscale Science and Engineering Chemical Engineering (College of Chemistry) Administrative Officers Contact Information Index 3 5 5 5 5 6 6 7 7 8 11 13 17 20 24 Opportunities and Services Admission and Degree Requirements Academic Departments and Programs 30 31 34 35 40 44 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 56 56 57 57 59 59 60 Joint Major Programs Additional Programs and Affiliated Groups General Information Announcement of the College of Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, 2009-10. Published by Public Affairs, University of California, Berkeley, 2200 Bancroft Way #4204, Berkeley, CA 94720-4204. Third-class postage paid at Berkeley, CA. UC Berkeley home page: berkeley.edu. College of Engineering home page: coe.berkeley.edu. Although care is taken to ensure the accurancy of all information, there may be unintended errors and changes or deletions without notification. Telephone: (510) 642-7594. From the Dean This is truly an amazing time to be an engineer. Science and technology have an impact on nearly every facet of our daily lives — how we communicate, travel, obtain information, protect and preserve our environment, improve our health, build and protect our cities, and solve many of today’s most pressing problems. UC Berkeley’s College of Engineering prepares students to meet these challenges as leaders, with creativity and innovation. The engineering programs described within these pages offer a solid foundation in mathematics and science to prepare students for specialization in one of our engineering departments or interdisciplinary programs. In addition, the engineering curricula call for study in the humanities and social sciences, to give students the well-rounded background needed to contribute to our increasingly complex and multifaceted society. Our engineering student organizations, a vital part of the College, also offer many opportunities to develop the communication and leadership skills that are essential in all aspects of a well-rounded professional career. This announcement — read in conjunction with the General Catalog and the College of Engineering web site — explains procedures and outlines courses of study in the College. I urge you to seek out all that the College and University have to offer — courses, special seminars and lectures, alumni events, and the breadth of cultural activities hosted by the Berkeley campus. This will enrich your years at Berkeley and your preparation for a rewarding career in engineering. 3 Introduction S. Shankar Sastry Dean, College of Engineering McLaughlin Hall, the main administration building for the College of Engineering t About the College of Engineering UC Berkeley Engineering is a community that is dedicated to creating tomorrow’s leaders and supporting today’s pioneers. Students and researchers from around the world are drawn to Berkeley by its outstanding reputation, its internationally recognized faculty, and its strong tradition of impact in research and teaching. Earlier Berkeley engineers brought water to California’s great agricultural lands, pioneered the microelectronics that seeded Silicon Valley, and helped build the unbuildable in structures like Hoover Dam and the Golden Gate Bridge. Today, Berkeley engineers in every field remain at the center of technological innovation worldwide. Engineering: The Berkeley Equation UC Berkeley engineering students are not only taught by leading engineers, they benefit from top faculty in every field and the resources of one of the world’s great intellectual centers. In the latest survey by the National Research Council in 1995, 35 of 36 programs at Berkeley ranked in the top 10, more than any other university, public or private. Berkeley is not your typical place, and there are no typical Berkeley students. They are musicians, politicians, athletes, scientists, writers — bound together simply by their passion for learning. Students hail from every region in California, each state in the union and over 100 countries, and represent all backgrounds. On any given day at Berkeley, one could find themselves in a classroom being taught by a Nobel Laureate, at a free concert by a local independent rock band, an information session for the Concrete Canoe Team, a football game with over 75,000 California Golden Bears (Cal) fans, or shopping on world famous Telegraph Avenue. 5 Choosing Engineering Engineers are problem solvers. Drawing on a solid foundation in math and the sciences, engineers develop efficient ways to improve our quality of life. And when technological progress creates adverse side effects, engineers work to remedy them. Is Engineering for You? If you see yourself as a designer or builder — whether of structures, machines, electrical circuits, or systems of operation — then engineering may be right for you. If you would like to work as a manager or administrator of a technical enterprise, an engineering degree could be the best background to meet your goals. If you imagine yourself as a researcher in a technical field, then an education in engineering or one of the physical sciences may be your right choice. Most engineering research is directed toward a specific objective, applying science to meet a human need. It is most often a team effort, involving people with engineering, science, business, and other backgrounds. An Engineering Education. As rapidly as technology evolves, engineering evolves a step ahead, incorporating new knowledge and emerging technologies. Engineering today is broadly interdisciplinary; solving today’s challenges requires engineers from many disciplines working together with experts in such fields as business, biology, medicine, public policy, and economics. When in Berkeley... Sheltered by rolling hills and the San Francisco Bay, Berkeley is a vibrant and spirited city of surpassing richness. The University, the City of Berkeley, and the San Francisco Bay Area combine to form an extraordinary environment for all types of educational, artistic, and recreational pursuits. Coffeehouses, bookstores, and vendors line the streets near campus, and lecturers, artists and performers from around the world make sure to visit UC Berkeley. If you want to head into San Francisco, a city full of cultural and recreational opportunities, Bay Area Rapid Transit (BART) is just a few blocks away in downtown Berkeley. Scenic Napa Valley, just one hour’s drive north of Berkeley, produces some of the best wines in the country. Regardless of what you choose to do, you won’t find a more temperate climate or a more beautiful setting. Historic Hearst Memorial Mining Building, ornamented with suspended foam balls installed by artist J. Ignacio Díaz de Rábago and a team of interdisciplinary Berkeley students t 6 Opportunities and Services College of Engineering Student Information Online Resources For more information on programs and resources narrated in this section, please see the following web sites: Academic Advising and Support Undergraduate Student Affairs Office: coe.berkeley.edu/advising Student Involvement: coe.berkeley.edu/studentinvolvement Kresge Engineering Library: lib.berkeley.edu/ENGI Undergraduate Research: coe.berkeley.edu/student-research Freshman and Sophomore Seminars: fss.berkeley.edu Continuing Education: unex.berkeley.edu Center for Underrepresented Engineering Students (MEP, GrAD, JMEP, SUPERB): coe.berkeley.edu/cues Alumni Relations: coe.berkeley.edu/alumni Supporting the College: coe.berkeley.edu/support-the-college Student Activities and Support Services College of Engineering Student Affairs Office The Student Affairs Office provides advising and administrative services in all matters pertaining to undergraduate engineering students. The staff is available to assist students, faculty, and the public with information on University, College, and departmental rules and regulations, degree requirements, transfer admission requirements and other student matters. Engineering Libraries The 22,000 square-foot Kresge Engineering Library provides 250 stations for reading or studying, access to the campus wireless network, and an array of electronic information resources. The library’s collection includes approximately 250,750 volumes, over 2,400 engineering journals in electronic and/or print format, over 2,100 electronic books in engineering, and over 730,000 technical reports. In addition to the Kresge Engineering Library, the College is served by three specialized libraries: the Water Resources Center Archives, Earthquake Engineering Research Center Library, and Harmer E. Davis Transportation Library. Advising and Academic Support Each undergraduate within in the College of Engineering is assigned both a student affairs and faculty adviser at the time of admission. Insofar as possible, students will continue with these advisers throughout their undergraduate careers. Student affairs advisers guide students in regards to academic requirements and assist with academic questions or concerns. Faculty advisers serve as academic and professional mentors and aid in long term course planning, locating research opportunities and information regarding their respective fields. Academic departments also have advisers to help students learn more about the programs, facilities and research, as well as to point students toward appropriate faculty contacts. A wide selection of tutoring and additional support services are available at the university, college and departmental levels, including alumni mentorships, peer advising and a buddy program that pairs a new student with a current undergraduate. Graduate students should consult their department for information on support and advising services. Student Center The Stephen D. Bechtel Engineering Center is the intellectual and social hub of the College. The center houses the Kresge Engineering Library and the Meakin Interdisciplinary Studies Center. The Sibley Auditorium of the Bechtel Center accommodates large audiences to hear visiting speakers, and conference rooms provide a place where students can meet with professional engineers and alumni. In addition, the center houses the offices of student organizations and adjoining lounges for informal student activities. Academic Enrichment Opportunities Undergraduate Research Undergraduate research plays an important role in the educational experience and provides practical skills for future employment and graduate school. Engineering students have a wide range of opportunities throughout the College and University to participate in groundbreaking research with faculty and graduate students. Other Student Information Web Sites Campus Life and Leadership: cll.berkeley.edu Career Center: career.berkeley.edu Financial Aid: financialaid.berkeley.edu Housing and Dining Services: housing.berkeley.edu University Health Services: uhs.berkeley.edu Student Involvement An engineering education at Berkeley does not begin and end in the classroom. Active participation in student organizations enhances and broadens a student’s experience and provides the unique opportunity to integrate material learned in the classroom with a chance to develop character and leadership skills. Through professional societies, campus groups, award-winning competitive engineering teams and publications, students are encouraged to explore engineering and its implication with their peers, faculty and practicing engineers. Freshman and Sophomore Seminars The College of Engineering provides a number of introductory courses of interest to freshmen and sophomores. These courses are generally not in the required programs but are for enrichment, orientation to the College and major, and guidance in the profession. They provide an unparalleled opportunity for faculty members and small groups of lower division students to explore a scholarly topic of mutual interest together. Continuing Education The Continuing Education in Business and Technology Department of University Extension provides a broad range of technical courses for engineers, engineering managers, environmental management personnel, and engineering-oriented personnel in related fields who are interested in updating their knowledge in their own field or in exploring other areas of engineering. The most recent advances and newest technologies are covered in intensive short courses, evening classes, online courses, lecture series, and an annual Summer Engineering Institute offered in cooperation with the College of Engineering. 7 Opportunities and Services Center for Underrepresented Engineering Students Charles Tunstall Multicultural Engineering Program (MEP) The objective of the Charles Tunstall Multicultural Engineering Program is to increase the number of underrepresented students who enroll and graduate with bachelor’s degrees in engineering from Berkeley. MEP provides outreach and recruitment activities; an academic enrichment summer program; counseling and advising; academic support (i.e., workshops, individual and group tutoring); and information on financial assistance, research opportunities, and graduate school. Summer Undergraduate Program in Engineering Research at Berkeley (SUPERB) SUPERB offers outstanding underrepresented students and students who have been educationally or economically disadvantaged the opportunity to gain research experience by participating in eight-week summer research projects with engineering faculty and graduate students. Support for the College Through gifts to the Berkeley Engineering Annual Fund, alumni, parents, friends, faculty, and students help ensure the College’s continued excellence as one of the premier engineering educational and research institutions in the world. The Annual Fund supports a number of initiatives intended to enhance a student’s experience while at Berkeley Engineering, such as: • Undergraduate research opportunities • Competitive start-up packages to attract talented new professors • Expansion of the College’s Kresge Engineering Library collection • Innovative student-run projects like the human-powered vehicle • BEAR social and professional development events • Student and alumni publications like Engineering News and Forefront magazine Graduate Academic Diversity (GrAD) Program The Graduate Academic Diversity Program (GrAD) provides support services for prospective and current students in the College of Engineering. It advises applicants on opportunities in the College, the graduate admissions process, fellowships, and academic support services of the College and the Berkeley campus, and it provides a forum for ideas and programs designed to enhance the educational experience of underrepresented engineering students. Alumni and Support for the College of Engineering Berkeley Engineering Alumni Relations Every student graduating from the College of Engineering or in chemical engineering belongs to the Berkeley Engineering Alumni Relations, or BEAR, family. The College’s alumni relations department hosts a number of social and professional development events for students throughout the year to help them connect with each other, meet alumni and prepare for their careers. Events include: • Real World Engineering, a student career conference showcasing alumni speakers offering career advice • Success Seminars, on subjects like resume critiquing and preparing for job interviews • Speed career networking with alumni • New student orientation • New graduate student beer and pizza parties • Graduate student champagne receptions • Online career fairs Julia Morgan Engineering Program (JMEP) The mission of the Julia Morgan Engineering Program (JMEP) is to support all students to achieve their full potential in careers as engineering and leaders and to provide educational materials about the contributions of women in engineering. JMEP provides academic support and programming, such as pre-admissions advising, tutoring, and graduate school advising. 8 Admission and Degree Requirements Undergraduate Admission and Degree Requirements Online Resources: For more information on the topics in this section, please see the following web sites: UC Berkeley General Catalog: catalog.berkeley.edu Office of Undergraduate Admissions: admissions.berkeley.edu College of Engineering Prospective Students: coe.berkeley.edu/prospectivestudents Transfer Admission Program Requirements/Course Articulation: assist.org Undergraduate Student Affairs Office: coe.berkeley.edu/advising Humanities/Social Studies (H/SS) Requirement: coe.berkeley.edu/hssreq Undergraduate Handbook: coe.berkeley.edu/undergradhandbook Engineering Science3 Computational Engineering Science Engineering Mathematics and Statistics Engineering Physics Environmental Engineering Science Industrial Engineering and Operations Research1 Manufacturing Engineering3 Materials Science and Engineering1 Mechanical Engineering1 Nuclear Engineering1 Joint Majors3 Bioengineering and Materials Science and Engineering Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences and Materials Science and Engineering Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences and Nuclear Engineering Materials Science and Engineering and Mechanical Engineering Materials Science and Engineering and Nuclear Engineering Mechanical Engineering and Nuclear Engineering ___ Chemical Engineering and Materials Science and Engineering Chemical Engineering and Nuclear Engineering (Chemical Engineering and the Chemical Engineering joint major programs are offered through the College of Chemistry and are described in detail in the Announcement of the College of Chemistry.) Admission to Joint Major Programs Freshman Admits. Students admitted to the College of Engineering as freshmen may petition or apply to a joint major in their third or fourth semesters if they have at least a 3.0 GPA. Some joint majors accept petitions at any time during these semesters, while others require an application process administered only once per year near the beginning of the spring semester. Engineering students considering a joint major are advised to meet with their student affairs adviser in the College of Engineering Student Affairs Office before their third semester to learn more about the process. See coe.berkeley.edu/joint-majors for more information. Junior Transfer Applicants. Junior transfer applicants may apply directly to one of the joint major programs. Transfer students may not change their major after admission, so those interested in a joint major program should select carefully before submitting their application. See the College’s Prospective Students web page for more details on transfer admission and requirements. Applicants interested in a joint major with chemical engineering must apply to the College of Chemistry. Admission to Minor Programs Admission to minors programs are administered by the respective department. See the “Academic Departments and Program” section of this announcement or the department web site for more information. Undergraduate Minors Undergraduate Programs Students in the College of Engineering at Berkeley may elect one of the curricula listed below. Each is four years in length and leads to the Bachelor of Science degree.* Bioengineering3 Civil Engineering1 Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences Electrical and Computer Engineering1 Computer Science and Engineering 2 *In addition to the majors listed, freshman applicants may apply to the Engineering — Undeclared admission option. This option is designed for students with a strong background and interest in mathematics and physics who have not yet identified a specialization within engineering. After completing the Engineering — Undeclared curriculum, the student must transfer into a degree program for the final two years. For more information, see the Engineering — Undeclared section of this announcement. 1 Bioengineering Computer Science Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Environmental Engineering (Civil and Environmental Engineering) Geoengineering (Civil and Enviromental Engineering) Industrial Engineering and Operations Research Materials Science and Engineering Mechanical Engineering Nuclear Engineering Structural Engineering (Civil and Environmental Engineering) Admission from another college at UC Berkeley Students who have completed at least one semester and are in progress to complete a second semester may petition to transfer to the College of Engineering from another college on campus. Admission is competitive and petitions are reviewed only once each academic year at the beginning of the spring term. All interested students are encouraged to attend change of college workshops during the fall semester before they apply. See the College’s Prospective Students web page for more information. Admission Admission to Undergraduate Programs The College of Engineering admits students at the freshman and junior-transfer levels. All applications are administered by the University’s Office of Undergraduate Admission. See the General Catalog or visit the admissions Web site for details on requirements and the application process. Additional information for prospective College of Engineering applicants may be found on the College’s Prospective Students web page. Admission as a Second Bachelor’s Degree candidate Although this is ordinarily discouraged, some applicants who already hold a bachelor’s degree in a nontechnical or non-engineering field may be considered for admission. Applicants interested in a second degree should contact the College of Engineering Student Affairs Office for further information. These B.S. programs are accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of the ABET, Inc., 111 Market Place, Suite 1050, Baltimore, MD 21202-4012; telephone (410) 347-7700. This B.S. program is accredited by the Computing Accreditation Commission of ABET, Inc., 111 Market Place, Suite 1050, Baltimore, MD 21202-4012; telephone (410) 3477700. This program is not accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission or Computing Accreditation Commission of the ABET, Inc. 2 Readmission Students who withdrew after the first eight weeks of classes and before the end of the semester are not eligible for readmission until one year from the beginning of the semester in which the withdrawal was granted. 1 Continuing students who complete a semester of study and are eligible to attend the following semester but fail to do so and remain out of school are required to apply for readmission to the University for any future semester that they wish to attend. Students who are granted withdrawal are also required to apply for readmission in order to resume study in a future semester. Readmission is not guaranteed and is based upon the students’ academic record at the time of withdrawal and upon any course work taken during their absence from UC Berkeley. Students whose records are not satisfactory should not expect to be readmitted. Courses taken for the purpose of readmission must be approved by the associate dean before the student takes the course. An academic plan indicating courses expected to be taken and places of attendance must be submitted to the associate dean. Students returning to the University after an absence must meet the requirements of their degree program in effect at the time they are readmitted. If students have attended other institutions during their absence from the University, they must present an official transcript of record from each college before readmission will be considered. Students who are applying for readmission after dismissal should discuss readmission with their student affairs adviser at the time of their dismissal. (3) The final 30 units are completed in residence in the College of Engineering on the Berkeley campus in two consecutive semesters. Humanities and Social Studies. To promote a well-rounded education with foundations in the liberal arts, the College has established a humanities and social studies requirement. The skills learned in the humanities and social studies supply students with additional tools to help them succeed in their intended engineering fields. The requirement includes two approved reading and composition courses and four additional approved courses, with which a number of specific conditions must be satisfied. See coe. berkeley.edu/hssreq for complete details and a list of approved courses. (2) Students’ study lists must contain at least 12 units of credit in any term. Students’ programs must receive the approval of the faculty adviser and must include at least two technical courses related to the chosen curriculum. Students are responsible for planning and satisfactorily completing graduation requirements and should follow, as closely as possible, the curricular recommendations given on the succeeding pages. Program deviations should be discussed with the faculty adviser. In all cases, students desiring to take more than 20.5 units or fewer than 12 units per semester must have prior approval of the dean. The minimum unit requirement for the bachelor’s degree is 120 semester units, within which the student is expected to satisfy graduation requirements. For valid reasons, this minimum may be exceeded by 10 units. The associate dean’s approval is required for students who, having entered as freshmen, have accrued more than 125 units and have been in attendance for four or more years and still have not satisfied graduation requirements. Junior transfers who have accrued more than 125 units and have been in attendance for two or more years without satisfying degree requirements also require the associate dean’s approval to continue.* Entering freshmen are normally allowed eight semesters to graduate, and entering junior transfers are normally allowed four semesters to graduate. Students who need an extra semester to graduate must petition to do so. Two extra semesters are almost never approved. If the associate dean grants an extra semester, the student will be required to enroll in at least 12 units and two technical courses in that extra semester. Honors. (1) Honors to Date. Students must have completed a minimum of 12 units undertaken for letter grades on the Berkeley campus to be considered for the award of semester honors. To qualify for this award, students must achieve a grade point average equal to or greater than the grade point average as determined for the College by the method outlined below. The actual date on which honors are awarded shall be entered on the student’s transcript. (2) Honors in General Scholarship at Graduation. To be eligible for honors in general scholarship at graduation, students must have: (a) completed at the University of California a minimum of 50 semester units, of which at least 43 units must be undertaken for a letter grade; for those students who complete more than 50 units at the University of California, the limit of passed/not passed units is one-third of the total units undertaken and passed on the Berkeley campus at the time the degree is awarded; units completed in an Education Abroad Program, or on another University of California campus by an undergraduate in an Intercampus Visitor Program, are considered Berkeley work for the 9 Admission and Degree Requirements Academic Rules and Regulations Absence from the University. Students returning after an absence from the University must meet the current curriculum requirements at the time of readmission. See the Admission section for more information. Scholarship Requirements. (1) Students are subject to dismissal if they (a) do not have a minimum C average for all work undertaken at the University; (b) do not obtain a minimum C average in each semester. (2) Students must have a minimum C average in all upper division technical courses required and elected in the curriculum in order to obtain the bachelor’s degree. Passed/Not Passed Grades. Students in good standing may undertake certain elective courses on a passed/not passed basis. These courses are not included in determining grade point average. No more than 40 units and no technical courses (mathematics, science, or engineering) nor courses required for the major program may be taken on a passed/ not passed basis. Upper Division. Students are expected to complete the lower division program before enrolling in upper division engineering courses. Exceptions may be made if the lower division deficiency is not a prerequisite to the intended upper division course and if the lower division program is being completed expeditiously. Normal Progress. Students in the College of Engineering must — except for reasons of health or outside employment — enroll in a full-time program and make normal progress toward the bachelor’s degree. Normal progress requires 30 units of completed course work each year. The continued enrollment of students who fail to achieve minimum academic progress shall be subject to the approval of the dean. To achieve minimum academic progress, two criteria must be met: (1) Students must have successfully completed a number of units no fewer than 15 times the number of semesters less one, in which they have been enrolled on the Berkeley campus. Summer Sessions will not be counted as a semester. General Degree Requirements Engineering students must fulfill University of California, Berkeley campus and the College of Engineering requirements to graduate. University Requirements Students must complete the general University requirements of Entry-Level Writing (formerly Subject A) and American History and Institutions discussed in the General Catalog. Berkeley Campus Requirements The Berkeley campus American Cultures Breadth requirement is satisfied by passing an approved course that is integrative and comparative and addresses theoretical and analytical issues relevant to understanding race, culture and ethnicity in American history and society. See the General Catalog for more information. College of Engineering Requirements Students in the College of Engineering must complete 120 semester units with the following provisions: (1) Completion of the requirements of one program of study (2) A minimum overall grade point average of 2.000 (C average) and a minimum of 2.000 grade point average in upper division technical course work. *At present, the 125-unit maximum does not apply to students in the Chemical Engineering/Materials Science and Engineering or Chemical Engineering/Nuclear Engineering joint major programs. 10 purpose of this regulation (204-A); (b) completed a minimum of 30 units on the Berkeley campus; and (c) achieved a grade point average ranking in the College as follows: • Top 3 percent, highest honors • Next 7 percent, high honors • Next 10 percent, honors At the end of each academic year, the Office of the Registrar determines for the College the minimum grade point averages of the top three percent, the next seven percent, and the next 10 percent of the students graduating in that year. These grade point averages serve the College as minimal criteria for honors during the next academic year. Students should consult the Undergraduate Student Affairs Office to learn the minimum grade point averages in effect for the current academic year. Attendees of the College of Engineering New Student Orientation watch future classmates learn to juggle the many tasks involved in college life, each represented by a balloon, in an activity entitled “High School Is Over.” Students should get comfortable in their seats: the orientation takes place in Pimentel Hall, where they may find themselves taking their introductory science courses. The hall is equipped with a revolving stage, so that it can be used continuously despite long setup times for science lectures. t Graduate Admission and Degree Requirements Online Resources For more information on the topics in this section, please see the following web sites: UC Berkeley General Catalog: catalog.berkeley.edu Graduate Division (Admission, Financial Aid, Academic Policies): grad.berkeley.edu Guide to Graduate Policy (Graduate Division): grad.berkeley.edu/policies/guide.shtml Guide to Graduate Program Rules and Regulations (College of Engineering): coe.berkeley.edu/graduate-guide • Architecture, M.Arch. — Civil and Environmental Engineering (Structural), M.S. • City and Regional Planning, M.C.P. — Civil and Environmental Engineering (Transportation), M.S. • Public Policy, M.P.P. — various Engineering, M.S. Interdisciplinary Programs The College also offers a number of interdisciplinary programs in which graduate study is related to the work of faculty in more than one engineering department and may include faculty and students from other areas of the University. These programs relate the application of technical, social, and economic knowledge to the analysis and solution of engineering problems. The following graduate interdisciplinary programs are available. Interested applicants should contact the department/unit indicated with the program: applied science and technology (Engineering Interdisciplinary Studies); environmental (Civil and Environmental Engineering); engineering and business administration (Mechanical Engineering or Business Administration); nanoscale science and engineering (Nanoscale Science and Engineering Graduate Group, Applied Science and Technology, Materials Science and Engineering, et al.); plasmas (Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences); robotics and manufacturing (Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences or Mechanical Engineering); rock mechanics (Civil and Environmental Engineering or Mechanical Engineering); surface and subsurface hydrology (Civil and Environmental Engineering, Materials Science and Engineering, or Mechanical Engineering). The Management of Technology (MOT) Certificate Program was established in 1987 as a research and teaching program that seeks to bring together faculty and students to address critical technology management issues. The certificate program is open to all graduate students enrolled in the Haas School of Business, College of Engineering, or other departments, and it allows students to specialize in the management of technology as they obtain their degrees. There is no separate admissions process for the MOT program. Once enrolled, students are eligible to take courses leading to a Certificate in Management of Technology. For information, contact the Management of Technology Certificate Program; 230 Bechtel Engineering Center; University of California, Berkeley; Berkeley CA 94720-1708; telephone: (510) 642-8790; email: motadmin@haas.berkeley. edu; web site: mot.berkeley.edu. Graduate Programs Admission Students admitted by the Graduate Division of the University to graduate study in engineering, including those interested in multidisciplinary programs, must be accepted by one of the engineering departments. Students must state on the admission application the department and the program of study they desire. Application for Admission. All necessary applications and information on graduate programs and department application deadlines are available at the department of interest. Prospective graduate students wishing to participate in an interdisciplinary program should apply for admission to one of the departments of the College or to the Graduate Group in Applied Science and Technology or the Joint UCSF/ UCB Graduate Group in Bioengineering. Students with an interest in Management and Technology may apply to Business Administration. See the General Catalog, the Graduate Division and your department of interest for details on admission requirements, deadlines, and financial support. Graduate Student Instructorships and Graduate Student Researchships. Graduate student instructorships (GSIs) and graduate student researchships (GSRs) are available to qualified graduate students. Graduate student instructors and researchers must carry a study program of at least 12 units. Students interested in these positions should indicate this in the department admission application. Graduate Programs The principal objectives of graduate study in engineering are: (1) To provide students with the scientific and professional knowledge necessary for their fields of interest. (2) To develop students’ abilities to formulate solutions to new and complex problems in their fields in the context of current economic, sociological, and environmental considerations. These objectives are accomplished by providing flexible programs of study designed to meet individual student needs. Programs The College offers programs of study in seven departments: • Bioengineering • Civil and Environmental Engineering • Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences • Industrial Engineering and Operations Research • Materials Science and Engineering • Mechanical Engineering • Nuclear Engineering In addition to the departmental majors, the College offers two interdisciplinary programs leading to the following degrees: • Ph.D. degree in applied science and technology. • Ph.D. degree in bioengineering, a joint degree program with the University of California, San Francisco. Concurrent degree programs that provide a broad integrated curriculum between two disciplines are: College Certificate Programs • Intelligent Transportation Systems — being established jointly by the Departments of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, and Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences. This certificate is not issued by the University of California, Berkeley. • Logistics — offered jointly by the Departments of Industrial Engineering and Operations Research and Civil and Environmental Engineering (see pages 19 and 31). This certificate is not issued by the University of California, Berkeley. • Energy and Business for Sustainability — offered in conjunction with the Haas School of Business, Energy and Resources Group, Goldman School of Public Policy, College of Natural Resources, and School of Public Health. It is the first certificate program approved at the highest campus level. • Management of Technology (MOT) — jointly sponsored by the College, the Haas School of Business, and the School of Information. This certificate is not issued by the University of California, Berkeley. Requirements for Higher Degrees For information on degree requirements and regulations, see the Graduate Division’s Guide to Graduate Policy. Requirements and regulations specific to the College of Engineering can be found in College’s companion publication, Guide to Graduate Program Rules and Regulations. 12 Academic Departments and Programs Bioengineering 306 Stanley Hall #1762 (510) 642-5833 bioeng.berkeley.edu Chair: Matthew Tirrell, Ph.D. Undergraduate Program The multidisciplinary undergraduate major in bioengineering is intended for academically strong students who excel in the physical sciences, mathematics, and biology. It offers students an opportunity to learn how to apply the physical sciences and mathematics in an engineering approach to biological systems. The undergraduate curriculum is designed to ensure that students will be well grounded in the fundamental principles and methods of engineering, as well as in integrative and molecular biology. There are further opportunities for specialization in advanced areas of both engineering and biology, including laboratory and clinical components. Bioengineering graduates may enter industry, go on to medical school, and/or pursue graduate studies in bioengineering and related disciplines. See undergraduate sample curricula on page 15 for more information on the undergraduate program requirements and concentrations. Bioengineering Department Overview Established in 1998, the Department of Bioengineering at UC Berkeley applies engineering principles and practices to living things, integrating biological and medical sciences with advanced technology to help people live longer and healthier lives. No other field fulfills the potential for interdisciplinary research and education more than bioengineering. Our work is concentrated on high-impact applications in molecular and cellular engineering that will bring about major advances in medicine and the life sciences. We anticipate future breakthroughs ranging from the design of drugs customized to an individual’s genome to tiny implantable drug delivery devices, to software and components that allow researchers to design bacteria like electronic circuits. Research efforts in the Department of Bioengineering are organized around five focus areas: Cell and Tissue Engineering, Biomaterials and Nanotechnology, Bioinstrumentation, Computational Biology, and Systems and Synthetic Biology. The department offers students the opportunity to work with outstanding faculty in these areas, plus the freedom to pursue studies with worldclass faculty in related areas of interest. This unique environment for learning and research in a rapidly growing discipline provides dedicated students with the foundation required to become leaders in the field of bioengineering. The Department of Bioengineering at UC Berkeley is supported by exceptional faculty, strong ties to other departments on campus, and close collaborations with other institutions like UC San Francisco and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. We continue to expand our department with new faculty, staff, facilities, and research programs, and we are coordinating a broad range of bioengineering-related activities currently underway on campus. Bioengineering Minor The department offers a minor in bioengineering that is open to all students not majoring in bioengineering who have completed the necessary prerequisites for the minor requirements. Information is available in the Student Services Office, 306 Stanley Hall. Joint Major Program in Bioengineering and Materials Science and Engineering The department offers a joint major program with the Department of Materials Science and Engineering. See the “Joint Majors” section of this announcement for a detailed description and curriculum. Berkeley Summer Bioengineering Research Program Established in 2000, the Berkeley Summer Bioengineering Research Program provides intensive laboratory research experience to promising undergraduates. After a competitive application process, selected students are supported by a stipend while performing full-time research in faculty laboratories for 10 weeks during the summer. The intensive experience allows students to devote themselves to the project and learn a lot in a short time. Many continue to do research with their faculty mentors into the fall. More information is available at bioeng.berkeley.edu/bsbrp. Sutardja Dai Hall houses the Center for Information Technology Research in the Interest of Society (CITRIS), dedicated to creating information technology solutions for the world’s most pressing social, environmental, and health care problems. t 14 Graduate Study A list of Graduate Group faculty can be found at bioegrad.berkeley.edu. The graduate degree (Ph.D.) in bioengineering is jointly offered by UC Berkeley and UC San Francisco (UCSF). The Joint Graduate Group in Bioengineering is an interdisciplinary program that combines the resources in biomedical sciences at UCSF with the excellence in engineering, physical, and life sciences at UC Berkeley. With over 140 faculty members from 35 departments on the two campuses, our program offers unmatched graduate training opportunities in bioengineering. All students in the program are simultaneously enrolled at both the Berkeley and San Francisco campuses and may take courses and perform research on either or both campuses. The program awards the Doctor of Philosophy in Bioengineering degree from UC Berkeley and UCSF. Students with a B.A. or B.S. degree in engineering, biology, or other related fields are eligible for admission. Students can obtain additional information and application materials by contacting the Bioengineering Graduate Program, Department of Bioengineering, 306 Stanley Hall, University of California, Berkeley; Berkeley, CA, 94720-1762; (510) 642-9931; bioegrad.berkeley.edu. Facilities Laboratory research is an important component of the bioengineering educational program. Numerous undergraduate and graduate research opportunities are made possible in laboratory facilities located at the Berkeley campus, the UCSF campus, and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). Most core bioengineering faculty have laboratories in Stanley Hall (see page 47 for photo), a new interdisciplinary science and engineering building recently completed at Berkeley. Housing research groups from the Departments of Bioengineering, Chemistry, Molecular and Cell Biology, and Physics, the new Stanley Hall was designed to foster collaboration among faculty and students who do research at the intersection of the biological and physical sciences and engineering. The eight-floor, 285,000 square-foot building is also home to the Department of Bioengineering offices, teaching labs, the Biomolecular Nanotechnology Center, and other multi-user facilities. Bioengineering students have access to a number of specialized laboratories that reflect the breadth of research activities in the department, either in Stanley Hall or other buildings in close proximity on the Berkeley campus. More information about labs and facilities can be found on the Department of Bioengineering web site. Bioengineering Vice-Chair of Instruction Steve Connolly congratulates a recent graduate during the May commencement ceremonies. Engineering faculty in all departments work closely with both undergraduate and graduate students in research and career and course planning. t Undergraduate Program in Bioengineering* Freshman Year Chemistry 1A – General Chemistry or Chemistry 4A – General Chemistry and Quantitative Analysis Chemistry 3A and 3AL – Chemical Structure and Reactivity or Chemistry 112A – Organic Chemistry1 E 10 – Engineering Design and Analysis or BioE 10 – Introduction to Biomedicine for Engineers E 7 – Introduction to Applied Computing or CS 61A – Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs Mathematics 1A – Calculus Mathematics 1B – Calculus Physics 7A – Physics for Scientists and Engineers Seminar: BioE 24 – Aspects of Bioengineering and/or BioE 25 – Careers in Biotechnology2 Reading and Composition Course from List A3 Total Sophomore Year Biology 1A and 1AL – General Biology Chemistry 3B – Chemical Structure and Reactivity or Chemistry 112B – Organic Chemistry4 Engineering/Biology Preparation5 Mathematics 53 – Multivariable Calculus Mathematics 54 – Linear Algebra and Differential Equations Physics 7B – Physics for Scientists and Engineers Reading and Composition Course from List B Total Junior Year Bioengineering Fundamentals (see concentrations for recommendations)6 Engineering Topic (see concentrations for recommendations) Technical Electives (see concentrations for recommendations)8 Upper division biology elective (see concentrations for recommendations)9 First Additional Humanities/Social Studies Course2,3 7 119-125 Units** Fall 4 3-4 4 1 4 16-17 3 3 4 4 14 4 3 4 3-4 Spring 5 4 4 4 1 18 5 3 4 4 16 4 3 3 3-4 13-14 4 4 4 3-4 15-16 1 Chemistry 112A/B is intended for students majoring in chemistry or a closely related field and is more intensive than Chemistry 3A/3B. Note: Prerequisites to Chemistry 112A/B include Chemistry 1A and Chemistry 1B (or Chemistry 4A and Chemistry 4B). 2 This requirement may be completed at any time in the program. 3 15 The Humanities/Social Studies (H/SS) requirement includes two approved reading and composition courses and four additional approved courses, with which a number of specific conditions must be satisfied. This chart shows the courses in recommended order, but in most cases H/SS courses can be taken at any time during the program as long as prerequisites are met. See coe.berkeley.edu/hssreq for complete details and a list of approved courses. Consult the “Ethics Content List” on the following page for courses with ethics content. 4 Pre-Med studenst should take Chemistry 3B and 3BL or Chemistry 112B and Biology 1B. Select two from the Engineering/Biology Preparation list. 5 6 Choose courses from the approved Bioengineering Fundamentals list. Choose courses from the approved Engineering Topics list. 7 8 Choose courses from the approved Technical Elective list. 9 Choose courses from the approved Upper Division Biology list. 10 Choose courses from the Bioengineering Topics list. 2,3 BioE 100 – Ethics in Science and Engineering or Second Additional Humanities/Social Studies Course (with Ethics Content)3,4 Total Senior Year Bioengineering Lab Course Bioengineering Topics (see concentrations for recommendations)10 Engineering Topic (see concentrations for recommendations)7 Technical Elective (see concentrations for recommendations)8 Bioengineering Design Project or Research Total 2 14-15 4 4 3 3-4 14-15 * Program of study must include: (a) 42 units of upper-division coursework in technical subjects such as engineering, chemistry, physics, integrative biology, molecular and cell biology, mathematics, or statistics. Of these units, at least 22 must be in bioengineering. The 42 units must be from the bioengineering core curriculum (excluding BioE 100) or the Curriculum Electives lists. (b) 45 units of engineering (upper or lower division). These units must be from courses that appear on the Bioengineering Topics or Engineering Topics lists. Students are advised to consult the approved concentrations to identify an appropriate course sequence for bioengineering specialty areas, and may also design their own program that meets with the above requirements with permission from their faculty adviser. Regular consultation with an adviser is strongly recommended. **A minimum of 120 units is required for graduation. Third and Fourth Additional Humanities/Social Studies Courses2,3 16 Curriculum Electives Lists When planning your program, please note that your are required to include following: (a) 42 units of upper-division coursework in technical subjects such as engineering, chemistry, physics, integrative biology, molecular and cell biology, mathematics, or statistics. Of these units, at least 22 must be in bioengineering. The 42 units must be from the bioengineering core curriculum (excluding BioE 100) or the Curriculum Electives Lists. (b) 45 units of engineering (upper or lower division). These units must be from courses that appear on the Bioengineering Topics or Engineering Topics lists. Bioengineering Fundamentals: BioE 101, 102, 104, 110, 115, 131 Bioengineering Topics: BioE 10, 22 and 22L, 101, 102, 104, C105B, 110, 112, 113, 115, 116, C117, C118, C119, 121, 121L, C125, 131, 135, C140L, C141, 142, 143, C144, C144L, C145L, C145M, C146, 150, 151, 164, C165, 168L, 190A-H. Engineering Topics: BioE 192, H194, 196; Chem E 140, 141, 150A, 150B, 170A, 170B, 171, C178; CE C30/ME C85; CE 130N; CS 61A, 61B or 61BL, 70, 170, 186, C191; E 45, 115, 170; E 7, 10, 190; EE 20N, 40, 100, 105, 117, 120, 126, 129, 142, 143, 192; IEOR 162; ME 102, 104, 106, 109, 118, 119, 128, 133, 167, 185; MSE 102, 104, 111, C113, 151; NE 101, 107, 170B. Also includes any course from the BioE Topics list. Technical Electives: Biology 1B; Chemistry 120A, 120B, C130/ MCB C100A, 130B; CS 61B or 61BL; IEOR 172 (or Statistics 134); Math 55, 110, 118, 127, 128A, 170; Physics 7C, 110A, 112, 137A, 177, C191; Public Health 143; Statistics 101, 133, 134 (or IEOR 172), 135, 150. Also includes any course from the Bioengineering Topics, Engineering Topics, Upper Division Biology, or BioE Topics lists. Upper Division Biology: Integrative Biology 115, 127 and 127L, 131, 132, 135 (or 135L), 148, C163; Chemistry 135; MCB C100A, 100B, 102, 110, 111, 130, 130L, 132, 135K, 136, 140, 140L, C145, C148, 150, C160/Neuroscience C160, 160L, 166; Plant and Microbial Biology 185. Bioengineering Lab Courses: BioE 22 and 22L, 115, 121L, 140L, C144L, C145L, C145M, 168L Engineering / Biology Preparation: BioE C105B; E 45; EE 20N, 40 or 100; CS 61B or 61BL; Chemistry 120B, C130/MCB C100A. Bioengineering Design Project and Research: BioE 121L, 140L, 168L, 192, H194, 196 (these courses do not count toward engineering or upper division technical units.) Science, Policy, and Management 161, 162; Letters and Science 160B; Philosphy 2, 104, 107; Public Health 115. Fulfills Bioengineering Ethics Content requirement only: E 191, Public Health 116 IV. Cell and Tissue Engineering: Engineering/Biology Preparation: E 45 and BioE C105, Chemistry 120B or C130/MCB C100A Bioengineering Fundamentals: BioE 102, 104 Engineering Topics: Choose couses from engineering topics curriculum electives list. Bioengineering Topics: BioE 116 and 112, C118 or C218 Technical Electives: Chemistry 135 or MCB 110 and Statistics 134 or EE 126 (Junior); IB 131, 132, 135, MCB 150 and/or 160 (Senior) Upper Division Biology: MCB 130 or 150 Bioengineering Lab Course: BioE 115 V. Computational Bioengineering: Engineering/Biology Preparation: CS 61B (Sophomore); BioE C105, Chemistry 120B or C130/MCB C100A (Junior) Bioengineering Fundamentals: BioE 131 (Sophomore), 102 or 110 (Senior) Engineering Topics: BioE 112 (Junior); BioE 102, 104, C118, 164; CS 70, 170, 186 (Senior) Bioengineering Topics: BioE 143, 144 Technical Electives: MCB 110, C145 and IB 115, MCB 111, 130, 148, 150; Math 55, 128A, 170, Physics 177, or Statistics 150 Upper Division Biology Elective: MCB 100B Bioengineering Lab Course: BioE 22 and 22L VI. Imaging: Engineering/Biology Preparation: EE 20N, 40 or 100 Bioengineering Fundamentals: BioE 102, 104 Engineering Topics: BioE 145L (Junior), any from approved list (Senior) Bioengineering Topics: BioE 164 and C165 Technical Electives: EE 117 or 120 and Statistics 134 or EE 126 (Junior), any from approved list (Senior) Upper Division Biology Elective: Chemistry 135, MCB 102, 130, or IB 131 Bioengineering Lab Course: BioE 145M or 168L VII. Pre-Med: Engineering/Biology Preparation: Chemistry C130/MCB C100A (Sophomore); E 45 or EE 100 (Junior) Bioengineering Fundamentals: BioE 102, 110 Engineering Topics: BioE 104 (Junior), any from approved list (Senior) Bioengineering Topics: BioE 116, C118, 121, 164 and/or C165 Technical Electives: Biology 1B (Sophomore); Statistics 134 or EE 126 (Junior), any from approved list (Senior) Upper Division Biology Elective: MCB 150 Bioengineering Lab Course: any from approved list Bioengineering Concentrations Students are advised to consult the approved concentrations to identify an appropriate course sequence for bioengineering specialty areas. Students may also design their own program that meets all of the bioengineering requirements with permission from their faculty adviser. Regular consultation with an adviser is strongly recommended. See bioeng.berkeley.edu/curriculum for curriculum diagrams for each concentration. Recommended Courses: I. Biomaterials: Engineering/Biology Preparation: E 45 and BioE C105; Chemistry 120B or C130/MCB 100A Bioengineering Fundamentals: BioE 102, 104 Engineering Topics: MSE 102 (Junior), MSE 104 or Chem E 178 (Senior) Bioengineering Topics: BioE C118 and BioE 116 or 117 Technical Electives: Chemistry 135 or MCB 110; Statistics 134 or EE 126 (Junior); Physics 7C or BioE course (Senior) Upper Division Biology: MCB 130 or 150 Bioengineering Lab Course: BioE 115 II. Biomechanics: Engineering/Biology Preparation: E 45 and BioE C105; Chemistry 120B or C130/MCB 100A Bioengineering Fundamentals: BioE 102, 104 Engineering Topics: BioE 101 (Junior); BioE C118 or 164 (Senior) Bioengineering Topics: BioE 112 and C117 or C119 Technical Electives: Chemistry 135 or MCB 110 and Statistics 134 or EE 126 (Junior); IB 131, 132, and/or 135 (Senior) Upper Division Biology: MCB 130 or 150 Bioengineering Lab Course: BioE 115 or 168L III. Biomedical Devices: Engineering/Biology Preparation: E 45 and EE 40 or 100 Bioengineering Fundamentals: BioE 102, 104 Engineering Topics: EE 143 or ME 119 (Junior), BioE 112 or C118 (Senior) Bioengineering Topics: BioE 121 and 164 Technical Electives: Chemistry 120B or Chemistry C130/MCB 100A and BioE 22 and 22L (Junior), any from approved list (Senior) Upper Division Biology Elective: Chemistry 135; MCB 110, 150, or 166 Bioengineering Lab Course: BioE 115 Bioengineering Ethics Content List: Fulfills both Humanities/Social Studies (H/ SS) and Ethics Content: Anthropology 156B; BioE 100; E 124, 130AC, 195; Environmental Civil and Environmental Engineering 760 Davis Hall #1710 (510) 642-3261 www.ce.berkeley.edu Chair: Lisa Alvarez-Cohen, Ph.D. (3) To prepare graduates to become leaders in the civil and environmental engineering profession. Undergraduates at Berkeley have opportunities for professional interactions and community service. CEE has active student chapters of the American Society of Civil Engineers and the national honor society of Chi Epsilon. Additional student societies and clubs are available on campus for students to develop leadership skills and engage in professional and social interactions. The civil engineering undergraduate program is accredited by Engineering Accreditation Commission of the ABET, Inc., 111 Market Place, Suite 1050, Baltimore, MD 212024012; (410) 347-7700. 17 Civil and Environmental Engineering Department Overview Civil and environmental engineers design, construct, and maintain the built environment in which we live and work. Projects range from the tallest skyscrapers and soaring bridge spans to tunnels and underground structures. Our graduates work to ensure efficient transportation of people and goods on the highway system, by rail, by ship, and by air. We manage scarce water and groundwater resources, and we design and operate systems to protect public health, water quality, and the environment. We use modern materials and system analysis methods to manage and renew the civil infrastructure. Computing and information technology tools make it possible to sense the condition of the infrastructure, and then to communicate and rapidly respond to disruptions in normal operations. Highperformance computing is used to simulate the behavior of complex civil systems, visualize the results, and optimize management strategies. Demands for improvements to civil infrastructure are ever-present, because of population growth and deterioration of existing systems over time. Infrastructure must be designed and managed to minimize impacts on the environment. Our infrastructure also must be protected against natural and manmade hazards such as earthquakes, landslides, floods, fires, and explosions. The program in civil and environmental engineering at UC Berkeley, which is top-ranked nationally, combines fundamental science with modern engineering to address societal needs. Civil Engineering Areas of Emphasis Students with a specific interest within civil engineering may choose to emphasize one of the areas listed in the civil engineering undergraduate program curriculum grid at the end of this section. For each area of emphasis, suggestions are listed for elective courses and the capstone design project. Selection of an area of emphasis is optional. A bachelor of science in engineering is awarded whether or not a student follows the broad and general program or chooses an area of emphasis. Non-technical electives may fulfill the degree’s humanities/social studies requirement. (Please refer to the handout at coe. berkeley.edu/hssreq or in 308 McLaughlin Hall.) Students may also take the eight units of credit required to earn a Certificate in Management of Engineering and Innovation offered through the College of Engineering’s Center for Entrepreneurship and Technology. Civil Engineering Minors The department offers three minors: environmental engineering, structural engineering, and geoengineering. These minors are open to all students who are not majoring in civil engineering and who have completed the necessary prerequisites. Information is available in the Civil and Environmental Engineering Student Affairs Office, 750 Davis Hall, and on the department web site. Undergraduate Program The mission of the Civil Engineering B.S. degree program is to educate engineering leaders who will contribute to solving societal problems by improving the civil infrastructure, resource protection, natural hazard mitigation, and the efficient and sustainable functioning of engineered and natural systems in California, the United States, and worldwide. To achieve the missions of the College of Engineering and the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering (CEE), the department faculty have established the following Program Educational Objectives for the B.S. degree: (1) To prepare graduates to pursue postgraduate education in engineering or other professional fields. (2) To prepare graduates to become licensed professional engineers. Graduate Study The Civil and Environmental Engineering Department administers graduate programs that lead to both academic (Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy) and professional (Master of Engineering) degrees in the major areas of professional specialization. Engineering and Project Management The objective of the engineering and project management program is to educate professionals for leadership in corporate and project management, research, and teaching associ- 18 ated with the lifecycle of civil engineered systems. Teaching and research are organized around seven areas of emphasis: business management and leadership; human and organizational considerations; quality and reliability assessments; lifecycle engineering and management processes; production and construction engineering; engineering and the environment; and implementation processes and strategies. Because of the broad and interdisciplinary nature of this area of study, students are encouraged to pursue advanced and relevant course work in all of the department’s and college’s programs, and other campus programs, such as architecture, business, public policy, management of technology, and logistics. Structural Engineering, Mechanics, and Materials (SEMM) SEMM at Berkeley has programs in the fields of structural engineering, structural mechanics, and civil engineering materials. The programs are founded on rigorous principles and methods with application to engineering challenges in today’s world. The master’s degrees (M. Eng. and M.S.) provide an advanced education for a life-long career in professional practice or preparation for doctoral studies. The doctoral degree provides opportunities for careers in academic research and teaching, applied research, or advanced professional practice. Broad areas of graduate study within SEMM include earthquake engineering, including modern performance-based approaches; structural design, materials, and construction; hybrid experimental simulation of structures; computational structural analysis and dynamics; structural and geotechnical engineering; theoretical, structural, and computational mechanics; high-performance structural materials; information technologies in structural and civil engineering; reliability and risk engineering; and civil systems engineering. The purpose of the Civil Systems program is to prepare students who can address the broad challenges of the future with relevant knowledge and skills. Civil Systems is a multi-disciplinary program made up of students with degrees in a wide range of engineering and science disciplines, including civil and environmental engineering. The guidelines for the Ph.D. course work and research are flexible while maintaining intellectual rigor. The program provides the opportunity for in-depth knowledge in one or more specialties important for understanding civil and environmental systems. Students may enter the systems program with a Bachelor of Science or a Master of Science degree. Environmental Engineering Environmental engineers apply science and technology to manage our water and air resources and to control contaminants that threaten environmental quality. This program recognizes that engineering solutions to the challenges of human health and ecosystem protection require a broad-based approach to teaching and research. Because of the complex nature of these issues, education in preparation for professional practice is accomplished primarily at the graduate level. Students should have a solid undergraduate foundation in the engineering sciences. Areas of emphasis include the improvement of indoor and atmospheric air quality; conventional and natural processes for treatment processes of drinking water, wastewater, and hazardous wastes; quantification of contaminant transport processes in multimedia environments; soil chemistry, photochemical transformations, subsurface thermal and biological remediation technologies; identification and restoration of degraded ecosystems; surface and groundwater hydrology; hydrologic mixing processes; climate variability and change; water resources management; environmental fluid mechanics; and coastal zone processes in estuaries and shorelines. Concurrent Degrees and Certificate Programs The Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering offers three concurrent degree programs: Structural Engineering and Architecture (M.Arch/M.S.), Transportation Engineering and City and Regional Planning (M.C.P./M.S.), and any civil and environmental engineering program and Public Policy (M.P.P./M.S.). CEE offers three certificate programs: the Certificate in Management of Technology Program (MOT) that is offered in conjunction with the Haas School of Business and the School of Information; the Certificate in Logistics that is offered in conjunction with the Department of Industrial Engineering and Operations Research; and the Certificate in Engineering and Business for Sustainability that is offered in conjunction with the College of Engineering, the Haas School of Business, the College of Natural Resources, and the Schools of Public Health and Public Policy. Transportation Engineering The graduate program in transportation engineering offers courses in analysis techniques, planning methods, systems operations, design, systems engineering, management, economics, administration, and policy. Students have the opportunity to study in one of the world’s leading centers for transportation research, education, and scholarship. Research areas include transportation, including aviation and airport design and operation, intelligent transportation, transit, traffic safety, transportation finance, transportation economics, infrastructure design and maintenance, traffic theory, public policy, logistics, systems analysis, and environmental policy. The Institute of Transportation Studies (ITS) on the Berkeley campus provides students with a stimulating research environment and one of the world’s leading transportation libraries. ITS’s research program presents many opportunities for qualified students to obtain part-time employment. Facilities Facilities for advanced study and research are located on the Berkeley campus, at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and the Richmond Field Station. Students and faculty in the department are supported by a range of outstanding research facilities, including laboratories in structures and materials, environmental water resources, environmental quality, transportation engineering, geoengineering, and earthquake engineering. Departmental computing facilities include multiple instructional computing labs featuring high performance networked Windows workstations running advanced engineering applications, servers for centralized file storage and backup, and high-speed wired and wireless networks for data sharing. Additional computing resources are made available by research groups. See the department web site for more information on our research and facilities. Geoengineering The graduate program in geoengineering offers a full complement of education and research opportunities in the traditional geotechnical areas of soil mechanics, foundation engineering, earthquake engineering, geological engineering, underground construction, and rock mechanics, as well as in the emerging areas of environmental geotechnology, including groundwater hydrology, contaminant transport, and geotechnical aspects of waste disposal, clean up, and containment. In addition, this program offers both educational and research opportunities in the area of engineering geophysics. Opportunities for interdisciplinary studies are provided through close interaction in teaching and research with other areas of engineering, geology (and geophysics), seismology, and soil science. Civil Systems Many civil and environmental engineering problems involve large systems, such as transportation systems, environment systems, and metropolitan or national infrastructures, that operate as a network of complex and interrelated components. Innovative solutions often require a combination of domain knowledge, systems analysis, new technologies, economics, and management science that is rarely found in traditional disciplines alone. Undergraduate Program in Civil Engineering Freshman Year Chemistry 1A – General Chemistry or Chemistry 4A – General Chemistry and Quantitative Analysis E 10 – Engineering Design and Analysis E 7 – Introduction to Applied Computing Mathematics 1A – Calculus Mathematics 1B – Calculus Physics 7A – Physics for Scientists and Engineers CE 92 – Introduction to Civil and Environmental Engineering Reading and Composition Course from List A1 Reading and Composition Course from List B Total Sophomore Year Basic Science Elective2 CE C30/ME C85 – Introduction to Solid Mechanics CE 60 – Structure and Properties of Civil Engineering Materials CE 93 – Engineering Data Analysis Engineering Science and Sustainability Elective2 Mathematics 53 – Multivariable Calculus Mathematics 54 – Linear Algebra and Differential Equations Physics 7B – Physics for Scientists and Engineers First Additional Humanities/Social Studies Course1 Total Junior Year CE 100 – Elementary Fluid Mechanics CE 130N – Mechanics of Structures Elective Core 4 1 118-125 units* Fall 4 3 4 3 Elective Courses List Basic Science: Chemistry 1B, 4B; Physics 7C Engineering Science and Sustainability: CE 11, 70 Core: CE 103, 111, 120, 155, 167, 175, 191 Engineering Science: E 115; ME 40, 104, C105B Design: CE 104N, 112, 122, 123, 153, 177, 180 19 Spring 4 4 4 <1> 4 16-17 4 3 3 3 4 17 4 3 3 3-4 13-14 1 3-4 3-4 5-7 12-16 <1> 4 15-16 3 4 4 3-4 14-15 3 9 3-4 15-16 - Areas of Emphasis Students with a specific interest within civil engineering may choose to emphasize one of the areas listed below. Selection of an area of emphasis is optional. Recommended Courses: Engineering and Project Management: Elective Core: CE 120, 167 Design Elective: CE 180 Engineering Electives: CE 165, 166, 171, 173, 176, 191, 193; E 190 Suggested non-technical electives: Business Administration 124, 125, 150, 154, 155 Environmental Engineering: Elective Core: CE 103, 111 Design Elective: CE 104N, 112 Engineering Electives: CE 101, C106, 107, 108, 113N, 114, 115, C116, 173, 176, C178; E 117, 118, 190; MSE 112, 161; NE 124 Suggested non-technical electives: Biology 1B; Energy and Resources 100; Integrative Biology 153 Geoengineering: Elective Core: CE 111, 120, 175 Design Elective: CE 177 Technical Electives: CE 103, 115, 121, 122, 123, 124, 167, 171, 172, 173, 176, C178, E 190 Structural Engineering: Elective Core: CE 120, 167, 175 Design Elective: CE 122, 123 Technical Electives: CE 121, 124, 131, C133, 140, 165, 177, 193; E 190 Note: CE 121 is required for admission for graduate study in Structural Engineering, Mechanics and Materials. Transportation: Elective Core: CE 155, 191 Design Elective: CE 153 Technical Electives: CE 108, 167, 177, 250, 251, 259, 260; E 102, 117, 190; IEOR 153 Suggested non-technical electives: City and Regional Planning 110; Economics 101A, 125, 155; Energy and Resources 100; Geography C188; Public Policy 101 Note: Undergraduates wishing to enroll in graduate courses must have at least a 3.0 GPA and the consent of the instructor. Engineering Science Elective2 Second and Third Additional Humanities/Social Studies Course1 Total Senior Year CE 192 – The Art and Science of Civil and Environmental Engineering Practice Design Elective2 Engineering Electives Free Electives Total 1 5 15 15 Fourth Additional Humanities/Social Studies Course1 The Humanities/Social Studies (H/SS) requirement includes two approved reading and composition courses and four additional approved courses, with which a number of specific conditions must be satisfied. This chart shows the courses in recommended order, but in most cases H/SS courses can be taken at any time during the program as long as prerequisites are met. See coe.berkeley.edu/hssreq for complete details and a list of approved courses. 2 3 4 5 See the Elective Courses list. Choose one under this category. Can be taken either fall or spring. See the Elective Courses list. Choose four under this category. Engineering electives must include at least 15 additional units of upper-division technically oriented engineering coursework offered in the College of Engineering or in Chemical Engineering. The 15 units of engineering electives cannot include: any course taken on a P/NP basis; BioE 100; CS 194, 195, C195; E 100, 110, C111, 124, 130AC, 140, 191, 193, 195, 196; EE 194; IEOR 172, 190 series; ME 106. *A minimum of 120 units is required for graduation. 20 Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences Center for Student Affairs 205 Cory Hall #1770 (510) 642-7372 (undergraduate) (510) 642-3068 (graduate) eecs.berkeley.edu Chair: Edward Lee, Ph.D. Undergraduate Programs Under the auspices of the College of Engineering, EECS offers two undergraduate programs: Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE) and Computer Science and Engineering (CSE). The CSE program puts a greater emphasis on computer science, whereas the ECE program puts a greater emphasis on electrical engineering. Both programs require the same set of five lower-division core courses in EECS (EE 20N, 40; CS 61A, 61B, and 61C) and nearly the same math and science courses. After satisfying program requirements at the lower-division level, students are free to choose from a variety of elective upper-division courses. To guide students into a coherent choice of courses, we ask students to choose from one of five “options.” The choice of option affects the faculty advisor assignment, and the options provide sample programs that suggest reasonable tracks. See the sample programs for more information on the EECS options. Additional details about the curriculum, requirements, and sample programs that satisfy the requirements can be found in Undergraduate Notes, prepared by the Student Affairs Office of the EECS department at eecs.berkeley.edu/Programs/Notes/ Our undergraduate programs recognize the daunting intellectual breadth of the field by offering a great deal of flexibility. These programs are accredited by the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology and by the Computing Accreditation Commission (CAC) of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology, 111 Market Place, Suite 1050, Baltimore, MD 212024012; telephone: 410-347-7700. Department Overview UC Berkeley’s Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences (EECS) offers one of the strongest research and instructional programs in this field anywhere in the world. Our key strength is in our cross-disciplinary team-driven projects. The integration of electrical engineering (EE)1 and computer science (CS)2 forms the core, with strong interactions that extend into biological sciences, mechanical and civil engineering, physical sciences, chemistry, mathematics, and operations research. Our programs have been consistently ranked in the top three nationwide and worldwide by various organizations that rank academic programs. The mission of the EECS department has three parts: (1) educating future leaders in academia, government, industry, and entrepreneurial pursuit, through a rigorous curriculum of theory and application that develops the ability to solve problems, individually and in teams; (2) creating knowledge of fundamental principles and innovative technologies, through research within the core areas of EECS and in collaboration with other disciplines, that is distinguished by its impact on academia, industry and society; and (3) serving the communities to which we belong, at local, national, and international levels, with a deep awareness of our ethical responsibilities to our profession and to society. Our strategy to accomplish this mission is simple: recruit and retain the very best faculty, students, and staff, and then empower them to direct and drive the creation and dissemination of knowledge. We know that we have succeeded in this mission when our students succeed, becoming leaders and serving society. Organizationally, the EECS department smoothly integrates its world class faculty with dedicated staff and extremely active and involved student groups. EECS Options I. Electronics This option is for students interested in integrated circuits, electronic devices, nanotechnology, electromagnetics, micro and nano fabrication, photonics and optoelectronics, microelectromechanical systems (MEMS), electronic design automation (EDA), high power circuits, and applications to biomedicine, micro-robotics, sensors, actuators, energy production, storage, and conservation, and silicon structures. II. Communication, Networks, and Systems This option is for students interested in networks, control systems, digital and analog communications, information theory, signal processing, and systems modeling, design, verification, and optimization, together with applications to robotics, biomedicine, wireless communications systems, multimedia systems, multi-sensor fusion, and machine intelligence. 1 Accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology, Inc., 111 Market Place, Suite 1050, Baltimore, MD 212024012; telephone: (410) 347-7700. 2 Accredited by the Computing Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology, Inc., 111 Market Place, Suite 1050, Baltimore, MD 212024012; telephone: (410) 347-7700. III. Computer Systems This option is for students interested in machine architecture and logic design, communication networks, computer security, operating systems, database systems, programming systems and languages, embedded software, and/or digital devices and circuits, together with applications for networked computing, embedded systems, computer games, and information systems. IV. Computer Science This option is for students interested in the foundations of computing, which includes the theory of computation, the design and analysis of algorithms, complexity theory, the architecture and logic design of computers, programming languages, compilers, operating systems, scientific computation, computer graphics, database systems, artificial intelligence and natural language processing, and cryptography and computer security. V. General Course of Study This flexible program enables students whose interests are broad or who have yet to focus on a specific field to explore several topics in the areas mentioned above. Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences Joint Major Programs The department offers two joint majors with the Department of Materials Science and Engineering and Nuclear Engineering. See the “Joint Majors” section for full descriptions and details on the curricula. Computer Science Minor A minor in computer science is available to all undergraduate students at Berkeley with a declared major, except Computer Science and EECS majors, through the College of Engineering. Applications and more information on the Computer Science minor are available at the Computer Science Advising Office, 377 Soda Hall or eecs.berkeley.edu/csugrad/ minor.html EECS Honors Degree Program The Honors Degree Program is designed to provide very talented undergraduate students with more flexibility at the undergraduate level. Honors students select an academic concentration outside of EECS. In addition, students receive a special faculty advisor, engage in research, receive official notation of the honors degree on their Berkeley transcript, and are invited to special events with faculty and EECS honors alumni. Applications to the Honors Degree Program are accepted at the end of the fall and spring semesters. Typically students apply during their junior year. Visit the EECS Student Affairs Office or www.eecs.berkeley.edu/ Programs/honors.html for more information about the program. More information is also available in the EECS Undergraduate Notes available online at eecs.berkeley.edu/ Programs/Notes/Content/Chapter4.pdf Computer Science Leading to the Bachelor of Arts Degree In addition to a CS major through the College of Engineering, which confers the B.S. degree, the Computer Science Division also offers the major through the College of Letters and Science (L&S), which confers the B.A. degree. An essential difference between the two majors is that the EECS program requires a greater number of math and science courses than the CS program, which requires a greater number of non-technical, or breadth, courses. The computer science major under L&S auspices is not accredited by the Computing Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology. For further information about L&S computer science programs and requirements visit the Computer Science Advising Office in 377 Soda Hall. Useful information can also be found at www.eecs.berkeley.edu. Details about the computer science major offered through the College of Letters and Science also may be found under the course listings for computer science in the General Catalog. Advanced Degree Programs The Five-Year Bachelor’s/Master’s Program in EECS (B.A./M.S. or B.S./M.S.) The combined Bachelor’s/Master’s program is designed to take outstanding EECS and CS (L&S) undergraduates immediately into an intensive two-semester program conferring the Master of Science degree. This combined program promotes interdisciplinary focus and is best suited to those who are more “professionally oriented” as opposed to those wishing to pursue a more traditional research-based and discipline-specialized advanced course of study. As such, a distinguishing feature of this five-year program is its emphasis upon extended study in interdisciplinary, though allied, technical fields such as physics, biology, and statistics, or in professional disciplines such as business, law, or public policy. The program is aptly entitled, “Educating Leaders for the Emerging Global Economy,” and reflects a growing need for those who are technically skilled and who also possess an understanding of the business, legal, and social context of technology development and use. Conferral of the degree requires either writing a thesis (Plan I) or reporting on a project (Plan II), as is required of our other Master’s students. EECS Minor The EECS minor, offered through the College of Engineering, is open to any undergraduate who has declared a major on the Berkeley campus, with the exception of EECS majors. It is intended for students who have an interest in electrical engineering and computer science. Students interested only in computer science courses should consider the computer science minor. Applications are accepted throughout the year and are available from the Center for Student Affairs, 205 Cory Hall or eecs.berkeley.edu/ Programs/eecsminor.html 22 The EECS Graduate Program The EECS Graduate Program offers a comprehensive program geared toward research and teaching (Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy), and for careers in design, development, and management (Master of Engineering and Doctor of Engineering). The Master of Science program requires three to four semesters of study, while the Doctor of Philosophy program is normally completed in five to six years. The Master of Engineering program requires four semesters of study and includes a minor in a technical subject outside the major and a second minor in a nontechnical subject such as law, business administration, or the like. The Doctor of Engineering program, of about two years duration, builds on the course work for the Master of Engineering degree and requires a one-year internship in a design and development organization. Students with either a B.S. or an M.S. who intend to study for the D.Eng. should apply first for the M.Eng. program. Admission into the graduate program is extremely competitive, but, once admitted, students have a wide variety of cluster areas from which to choose an affiliation, and a large number of courses and seminars taught by leaders in their fields from which to design their study programs. Students apply to either the Electrical Engineering Division or to the Computer Science Division, although once they have been admitted to the department, the boundaries between the divisions are fluid. The principal area of interest of the student should determine which division to apply to. Students whose principal interests are in the following areas should apply to Electrical Engineering: • Communications and Networking • Control and Robotics • Design of Electronic Systems • Energy • Integrated Circuits • Physical Electronics • Signal Processing • Security Students whose principal interests are in the following areas should apply to Computer Science: • Artificial Intelligence • Computer Architecture and Engineering • Database Management Systems • Graphics and Human-Computer Interaction • Operating Systems and Networking • Programming Systems • Scientific Computing • Theory of computation Students with an interest in Biosystems can apply to either division. See the department web site for more information on graduate study and specializations. With the exception of those in the Five-Year Bachelor’s/Master’s Program, most who enter the graduate program do so with the expectation of pursuing their doctorates. The department does, however, accept “M.S. only” students and offers three types of degrees, discussed below. The principal requirements for the Ph.D. are: (1) course work from a major subject area and two minor subject areas; (2) the departmental preliminary requirement, consisting of an oral exam and breadth courses, which differ for EE and CS; (3) the qualifying exam; and (4) the dissertation. There is no foreign language requirement. For further information on establishing major and minor subject areas, division-specific requirements for prelims and breadth requirements, qualifying exam, and the dissertation, please refer to the Graduate Handbook prepared by the Graduate Admissions Office at eecs.berkeley. edu/Gradnotes. Designated Emphasis (DE): In keeping with the departmental priority given to crossdisciplinary applications of engineering and computer science, graduates may also choose to add a designated emphasis to their program. A designated emphasis is a specialization offered by existing Ph.D. programs that provides multi-disciplinary training and research opportunities outside of EECS proper, but in areas that share overlapping interests and goals. At present, three such designated emphases are available to our doctoral students: • Computational Science and Engineering • Communication, Computation and Statistics • Computational and Genomic Biology • Nanoscale Science and Engineering • New Media Students who pursue a DE receive recognition of their specialization on their transcripts and are well positioned to compete for preferred jobs in academia and industry. The Management of Technology (MOT) Certificate Program: This program is a joint effort between the College of Engineering, Haas School of Business, and the School of Information (SI) at Berkeley. See the Management of Technology section for more information. Master of Science (M.S.) The Department awards three types of Master of Science degrees: • Engineering — EECS: For EE students with a B.S. degree from an accredited engineering program, or for those who have the equivalent of a B.S. degree as determined by the department. • Engineering Science: For EE students with a Bachelor’s degree in a non-engineering field (i.e., chemistry, physics, math, geology, or the life sciences). • Computer Science: For CS students with a B.S. in computer science, or an equivalent as determined by the department. Students may choose to pursue Plan I, which requires writing a thesis, or they may pursue Plan II, which requires a report on a project. Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) The department offers three types of Ph.D. degrees, awarded to students under the same conditions as the corresponding M.S. degrees, above: • Engineering — EECS • Engineering Science • Computer Science Facilities The department is supported by state of the art laboratory facilities for computing, robotics, embedded systems, microfabrication, electronic devices, signal processing, networking, communications systems, and nanotechnology. Most of the advanced research is carried out in Cory and Soda Halls, but some advanced study and research are performed in the Space Sciences Laboratory, Radio Astronomy Laboratory, Lawrence National Laboratories (Berkeley and Livermore), and the Center for Pure and Applied Mathematics. More information on facilities can be found by exploring the Centers and Labs section of the department web site. Undergraduate Program in Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences Freshman Year CS 61A – Structures and Interpretation of Computer Programs CS 61B or 61BL – Data Structures Mathematics 1A – Calculus Mathematics 1B – Calculus Physics 7A – Physics for Scientists and Engineers Science Elective (see approved list in EECS Undergraduate Notes) Reading and Composition Course from List A1 Reading and Composition Course from List B Total Sophomore Year CS 61C or 61CL – Machine Structures EE 20N – Structure and Interpretation of Systems Signals EE 40 – Introduction to Microelectronic Circuits Mathematics 53 – Multivariable Calculus Mathematics 54 – Linear Algebra and Differential Equations Physics 7B – Physics for Scientists and Engineers First and Second Additional Humanities/Social Studies Courses1 Total Junior Year CS 70 – Discrete Mathematics and Probability Theory, 4 EE 126 – Probability and Random Processes, Mathematics 55 – Discrete Mathematics, Statistics 25 – Introduction to Probability and Statistics for Engineers, or Statistics 134 – Concepts of Probability E 190, Technical Communication Electives (EECS upper division) Third Additional Humanities/Social Studies Course1 Total Senior Year Technical Electives2 Fourth Additional Humanities/Social Studies Course1 Total 9 3-4 12-13 3 8 15 4 4 4 3-4 15-16 1 118-122* Spring 4 4 4 4 16 4 4 4 3-4 15-16 - Fall 4 4 4 4 16 Detailed curriculum for each of the Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences Options, refer to the EECS Undergraduate Notes available at eecs.berkeley.edu/ Programs/Notes. 23 12 3-4 15-16 14 14 1 The Humanities/Social Studies (H/SS) requirement includes two approved reading and composition courses and four additional approved courses, with which a number of specific conditions must be satisfied. This chart shows the courses in recommended order, but in most cases H/SS courses can be taken at any time during the program as long as prerequisites are met. See coe.berkeley.edu/hssreq for complete details and a list of approved courses. 2 Students must take a total of 45 units of engineering courses, including at least 20 units of upper-division EECS courses. The 45 units of engineering courses cannot include: any course taken on a P/NP basis; courses numbered 24, 39, 84; BioE 100; CS 194, 195, C195; E 100, 110, C111, 124, 130AC, 140, 191, 193, 195, 196; EE 194; IEOR 172, 190 series. *A minimum of 120 units is required for graduation. 24 Engineering Science 230 Bechtel Engineering Center #1708 (510) 642-8790 coe.berkeley.edu/engsci Chair: Tarek Zhodi, Ph.D. Department Overview The Engineering Science Program is administered by the Engineering Science Committee. Faculty associated with the major are listed at coe.berkeley.edu/engineering-sciencecommittee. The Engineering Science Program is multidepartmental and interdisciplinary. This undergraduate program encompasses a variety of closely-related areas of the physical and biological sciences, mathematics, and engineering. It is intended to provide a means whereby students, while acquiring knowledge of engineering methods, can pursue their interests in areas of natural science. The options offered within the curriculum prepare students for advanced study in engineering, science, bioengineering, or mathematics. There are four fully structured majors in the curriculum: Computational Engineering Science, Engineering Mathematics and Statistics, Environmental Engineering Science, and Engineering Physics. Computational Engineering Science. This interdisciplinary program recognizes the growing importance of computation as a methodology for attacking complex scientific and engineering problems. Combined with mathematical modeling and experimental observations, scientific computation enables engineers and scientists to solve problems that are otherwise intractable. The computational engineering science program provides a solid foundation in mathematics, the sciences, and engineering and fosters skills required for modeling, simulating, and solving complex problems. The emphasis is on the computation of science rather than the science of computation (i.e., CES is not computer science). Students have the opportunity to select courses from a wide variety of disciplines. The program provides a sound basis for graduate studies in engineering and the applied sciences. Additionally, it nurtures skills that are needed in large-scale technological modeling and simulations relevant to research in industry and national laboratories. Engineering Mathematics and Statistics. This interdisciplinary program offers students an opportunity to study pure and applied mathematics as essential components of modern engineering. By combining courses from pure mathematics, applied mathematics, statistics, the physical sciences, and engineering, a student may individualize a program of study in theory or applications, or both. The program provides a broad foundation for graduate studies in theoretical branches of engineering, as well as in mathematics. Alternatively, an appropriate choice of courses can prepare students for a career in specific sectors of industry or business. Also, students may choose to minor in a branch of engineering. Engineering Physics. This program interweaves classical and modern physics, chemistry, and mathematics with their engineering applications. A great strength of the program is its flexibility. The firm base in physics and mathematics is augmented with a selection of engineering course options that prepare the student to tackle the complex problems faced by society. Because the program emphasizes science and mathematics, students are wellprepared to pursue graduate studies in physics or engineering. Environmental Engineering Science. This is a multidisciplinary field requiring an integration of physical, chemical, and biological principles with engineering analysis for environmental protection and restoration. The program incorporates courses from many departments on campus to create a discipline that is rigorously based in science and engineering, while addressing a wide variety of environmental issues. Although an environmental engineering option exists within the civil engineering major, the engineering science curriculum provides a more broadly-based foundation in the sciences than is possible in civil engineering. This major prepares the student for a career or graduate study in many environmental areas. Undergraduate Programs in Engineering Science The programs in Engineering Science are all interdisciplinary. Students are encouraged to plan their individual programs in consultation with their faculty advisers. Students will be advanced to the upper division in Engineering Science upon satisfactory completion of the lower division requirements. Because of the interdisciplinary nature of this major, electives may be approved throughout the year. For the most updated list of approved courses, see coe.berkeley. edu/engineering-science/approved-courses. 1 Three courses from the following list of approved science electives: Biology 1A and 1AL, 1B; Chemistry 1B, 3A and 3AL (cannot receive credit for Chemistry 3A after taking Chemistry 1B), 3B and 3BL; E 45; Physics 7C 2 The Humanities/Social Studies (H/SS) requirement includes two approved reading and composition courses and four additional approved courses, with which a number of specific conditions must be satisfied. This chart shows the courses in recommended order, but in most cases H/SS courses can be taken at any time during the program as long as prerequisites are met. See coe.berkeley.edu/hssreq for complete details and a list of approved courses. 3 See the example clusters for this major. In collaboration with their advisers, students may choose four courses that form a coherent focus for their studies. At least three courses must be upper division. 4 A total of three courses from the following fifteen groups. Only one course per group is allowed. Many courses on this list have prerequisites. Students should plan carefully to be sure that prerequisites are met. Engineering Science Computational Engineering Science Freshman Year Chemistry 1A – General Chemistry E 7 – Introduction to Applied Computing E 10 – Engineering Design and Analysis Mathematics 1A – Calculus Mathematics 1B – Calculus Physics 7A – Physics for Scientists and Engineers E 39B – Introduction to Computational Engineering Science Reading and Composition Course from List A2 Reading and Composition Course from List B Total Sophomore Year Mathematics 53 – Multivariable Calculus Mathematics 54 – Linear Algebra and Differential Equations Mathematics 55 – Discrete Mathematics, Statistics 134 – Concepts of Probability, Mathematics 110 – Linear Algebra, or CS 70 – Discrete Mathematics and Probability Theory Physics 7B – Physics for Scientists and Engineers Science Electives1 First Additional Humanities/Social Studies Course2 Total Junior Year E 177 – Advanced Programming with MATLAB E 170 – Introduction to Modeling and Simulation Mathematics 128A – Numerical Analysis Mathematics 128B – Numerical Analysis CES Cluster Course 13 CES Cluster Course 2 Core Course 14 Core Course 2 Total Senior Year E 180A – Computational Engineering Science Modeling and Simulation E 190 – Technical Communication CES Cluster Course 33 CES Cluster Course 4 Core Course 3 Total 4 3 4 3 2 122.5-129.5 Units Fall 4 3 4 4 15 4 3-4 Spring 4 4 4 1.5 4 17.5 4 - 4 4-5 15-17 4 4 4 4 16 3 4 4 3-4 14-15 8-9 3-4 15-17 3 4 3 3 3-4 16-17 4 3 4 3-4 14-15 Applied Math: E 117 Bioengineering: BioE 121, 131, 143 Electrical Engineering: EE 40, 100 Electromagnetics: EE 117, Physics 110A Engineering Economics: E 120 Engineering Ethics: NE 175 Fluid Mechanics: ME 106, Chem E 150A, CE 100 Operations Research: IEOR 160, 165 Properties of Materials: E 45; MSE 102, 111 Nuclear Engineering: NE 101 Quantum Mechanics: Physics 137A Solid State Electronics: EE 130, Physics 141A Statics/Dynamics: CE C30/ME C85, Physics 105 Systems, Feedback and Control: EE 120, ME 132 Thermodynamics: Chem E 141, E 115, ME 40, C105B 5 One course from the approved list of computational project courses: BioE 143 – Computational Methods in Biology E 128 – Advanced Engineering Design Graphics IEOR 131 – Discrete Event Simulation IEOR 162 – Linear Programming ME 128 – Computer-Aided Mechanical Design ME 132 – Design Systems and Feedback ME 135 – Design of Microprocessor-Based Mechanical Systems ME 145 – Computer-Aided Thermal Design ME 180 – Engineering Analysis Using the Finite Element Method NE 155 – Introduction to Numerical Simulations in Radiation Transport MSE 215 – Computational Materials Science (taking MSE 215 requires a minimum 3.0 upperdivision technical GPA and College approval.) Second Additional Humanities/Social Studies Course2 Note: Cluster and core requirement courses must be preapproved by the faculty adviser. Computational Project Course5 Third and Fourth Additional Humanities/Social Studies Courses2 26 Computational Engineering Science Clusters Computational Engineering Science (CES) clusters are intended to provide depth in a cohesive multidisciplinary area. In the junior/senior year, students first select an approved CES cluster from the list below or petition to construct a new CES cluster. Then they choose four courses from the selected CES cluster. Where a core course overlaps with a CES cluster course, students may apply the course to either – but not both – areas. The following list of clusters is intended to be a representative, evolving set, with additions and modifications resulting from both student petitions and new courses. Please consult the General Catalog for prerequisites. Bionuclear Engineering: EE C145B; NE 101, 107, 162, 167 Computational Materials Science: E 45; MSE 102, 103, 111 (or Physics 141A), 112, 113, 117 (or Physics 141B), 118, 120, 121, 122, 123, 125; NE 120 Environmental Transport: CE 108, 116, 173; Chem E 150A, 150B, 171; NE 124 Mass and Energy Transport: Chem E 150A, 150B, 157, 171; ME 106, 107A, 107B, 165, 185 Mechanics: CE C30, 130N, 131; Integrative Biology 135; ME C85, 104, 106, 132, 133, 134, 165, 170, 175, 176, 185; Physics 105 Optimization: CS 170, 172, 174, 188; IEOR 131, 160, 161, 162, 166 Optoelectronics, Electromagnetics, and Plasmas: EE 117, 118, 119, 120, 121; MSE 111; NE 180; Physics 142; Statistics 134 Radiation Transport: NE 101, 124, 130, 150, 155, 162, 170B Thermodynamics and Combustion: Chem E 141; E 115; ME 40, 109, 140, 151; Physics 112 Other Clusters: Additional clusters must be preapproved by the faculty adviser and department by petition. Engineering Mathematics and Statistics Freshman Year 119-126 Units* Fall Spring 4 4 3-4 4 15-16 4 4 3 3-4 14-15 4 4 Because of the interdisciplinary nature of this major, electives may be approved throughout the year. For the most updated list of approved courses, see coe.berkeley.edu/engineering-science/approved-courses. 1 Two computer science courses from the following: E 7, 177; CS 61A, 61B or as approved by adviser. Students who opt to take E 177 should check prerequisites before enrollment. 2 27 Chemistry 1A – General Chemistry or 4 Chemistry 4A – General Chemistry and Quantitative Analysis Mathematics 1A – Calculus Mathematics 1B – Calculus Physics 7A, Physics for Scientists and Engineers First Computer Science course1 Lower Division Technical Electives (1 course) 2 4 4 3-4 15-16 4 4 3-4 2 Six units of lower division technical electives selected in consultation with a faculty adviser. Courses approved at the time of printing include: CS 61C; CE C30/ME C85; E 10, 28, 45; Mathematics 55 (transfer students may substitute upper division courses with approval of adviser) Reading and Composition Course from List A3 First Additional Humanities/Social Studies Course3 Total Sophomore Year Mathematics 53 – Multivariable Calculus Mathematics 54 – Linear Algebra and Differential Equations Physics 7B – Physics for Scientists and Engineers Physics 7C – Physics for Scientists and Engineers Second Computer Science course1 Lower Division Technical Electives (1 course) Reading and Composition Course from List B3 Second Additional Humanities/Social Studies Course Total Junior Year Mathematics 110 – Linear Algebra Mathematics 128A – Numerical Analysis Mathematics 105 – Integration or Mathematics 185 – Introduction to the Theory of Functions of a Complex Variable Statistics 101 – Introduction to the Theory of Probability or Statistics 134 – Concepts of Probability Upper Division Technical Electives4 Third Additional Humanities/Social Studies Course3 Total Senior Year Upper Division Technical Electives4 Fourth Additional Humanities/Social Studies Course3 Total 3 <Optional> Freshman Seminar or E 92 (Survey Course) <1> 3 The Humanities/Social Studies (H/SS) requirement includes two approved reading and composition courses and four additional approved courses, with which a number of specific conditions must be satisfied. This chart shows the courses in recommended order, but in most cases H/SS courses can be taken at any time during the program as long as prerequisites are met. See coe.berkeley.edu/hssreq for complete details and a list of approved courses. 4 Electives must include: (a) 16 units of upper-division courses in engineering; (b) Three additional upper division courses in mathematics or statistics from among: Mathematics 105, 113, 118, 123, 125A, 126, 128B, 130, 135, 140, 142, 170, 185, 187, 189; Statistics 135, 141, 150, 151A-151B, 152, 157; (c) A coherent series of electives selected in consultation with an adviser to provide depth in an area of engineering with high mathematical content. Lower division courses may be used as long as the student’s program has a total of 40 units of approved upper division technical subjects (mathematics, statistics, science, and engineering). Elective series examples include: Computer Science/Computation (e.g. CS 61A, 61B, 61C; Mathematics 55, 113, 115, 128B; IEOR 131, 162; CS 164, 170, 172, and 174); Dynamics, Differential Equations, and Physics (e.g. ME 104 or Physics 105; E115 or Chem E 141; Mathematics 123, 126, 128B; Physics 110A-110B, 112, 137A-137B, 138, 142; ME 106, 165, 170, 175, and 185); Communications and Control Systems (e.g. EE 40, 120; CS 61A, 61B, 61C; ME 134, 135); Operations Research (e.g. E 7; Mathematics C103/Economics C103; Mathematics 55, 113; Statistics 134, 135, 150; E 120; IEOR 131, 160, 161, 162). 4 15-16 3 - Note: Technical electives cannot include: any course that is only offered on a P/NP basis; courses numbered 24, 39, 84; BioE 100; CS 194, 195, C195; E 100, 110, C111, 124, 130AC, 140, 191, 193, 195, 196; EE 194; IEOR 190 series. IEOR 172 is an alternative course for Statistics 134. Students may not receive credit for both Statistics 134 and IEOR 172. IEOR 172 cannot be used to fulfill upperdivision units. It can only be used as a Statistics course. *A minimum of 120 units is required for graduation. Mathematics 104 – Introductory and Intermediate Analysis 4 3-4 5 15-16 15 15 4 3-4 15-16 12 3-4 15-16 28 Engineering Physics Freshman Year Chemistry 1A – General Chemistry Chemistry 1B – General Chemistry E 7 – Introduction to Applied Computing, CS 61A – Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs, or CS 61B – Data Structures Mathematics 1A – Calculus Mathematics 1B – Calculus Physics 7A – Physics for Scientists and Engineers Reading and Composition Course from List A 1 118-130 Units* Fall 4 4 Spring 4 - Because of the interdisciplinary nature of this major, electives may be approved throughout the year. For the most updated list of approved courses, see coe.berkeley. edu/engineering-science/approved-courses. 1 The Humanities/Social Studies (H/SS) requirement includes two approved reading and composition courses and four additional approved courses, with which a number of specific conditions must be satisfied. This chart shows the courses in recommended order, but in most cases H/SS courses can be taken at any time during the program as long as prerequisites are met. See coe.berkeley.edu/hssreq for complete details and a list of approved courses. 2 Technical electives must include: (a) Two courses from the following lower division technical electives: Astronomy 7A; Biology 1A, 1B; CE C30/ME C85; Chemistry 3A; E 10, 45; EE 40 (or 100); (b) 16 units of upper division courses in engineering; (c) A minimum of 14 units of upper division physics; (d) At least 40 units of approved upper division technical subjects (mathematics, statistics, science, and engineering). 3 If chosen, Physics 111A must be taken for at least 3 units. 4 Students opting to take EE 117 must take either EE 119 or BioE 164. Students opting to take the Physics 110A must take 110B. 4 4 <1> 16-17 4 4 4 1 4 4 4 16 4 4 4 3-4 15-16 3-4 4 Reading and Composition Course from List B1 <Optional> Freshman Seminar or E 92 (Survey Course) Total Sophomore Year Mathematics 53 – Multivariable Calculus Mathematics 54 – Linear Algebra and Differential Equations Physics 7B – Physics for Scientists and Engineers Physics 7C – Physics for Scientists and Engineers Technical Electives2 First and Second Additional Humanities/Social Studies Courses Total Junior Year E 115 – Engineering Thermodynamics or Physics 112 – Introduction to Statistical and Thermal Physics 3-4 15-16 - *A minimum of 120 units is required for graduation. Mathematics 104 – Introduction to Analysis and 4 Mathematics 185 –Introduction to Complex Analysis, or Mathematics 121A and 121B – Mathematical Tools for the Physical Sciences ME 104 – Engineering Mechanics or Physics 105 – Analytic Mechanics Physics 137A – Quantum Mechanics Physics 137B – Quantum Mechanics Technical Electives2 Third Additional Humanities/Social Studies Course1 Total Senior Year EE 143 – Microfabrication Technology, NE 104 – Nuclear Instrumentation Lab, or Physics 111A – Modern Physics and Advanced Electrical Lab3 ME 185 – Introduction to Continuum Mechanics or ME 106 – Fluid Mechanics Physics 110A and 110B – Electromagnetism4 or EE 117 – Electromagnetic Fields and Waves and either EE 119 – Introduction to Optical Engineering or BioE 164 – Optics and Microscopy MSE 111 – Electric and Magnetic Properties of Materials or Physics 141A – Solid State Physics Technical Electives2 Fourth Additional Humanities/Social Studies Course1 Total 3-4 3-4 4 3-4 14-15 4 3-4 14-16 - 4 3 3-4 3-4 4-5 14-17 5-6 3-4 14-17 Environmental Engineering Science Freshman Year 117-130 Units* Fall Spring 4 3-5 4 4 15-17 4 4-5 Because of the interdisciplinary nature of this major, electives may be approved throughout the year. For the most updated list of approved courses, see coe.berkeley.edu/engineering-science/approved-courses. 29 Chemistry 1A – General Chemistry or 4 Chemistry 4A – General Chemistry and Quantitative Analysis E 7 – Introduction to Applied Computing E 10 or Biology 1A and AL, Chemistry 1B or 4B, Chemistry 3A and 3AL, Earth and Planetary Science 50 Mathematics 1A – Calculus Mathematics 1B – Calculus Physics 7A – Physics for Scientists and Engineers Reading and Composition Course from List A1 First Additional Humanities/Social Studies Course Total Sophomore Year Mathematics 53 – Multivariable Calculus Mathematics 54 – Linear Algebra and Differential Equations Physics 7B – Physics for Scientists and Engineers Biology 1B – General Biology 4 4 4 1 4 4 3-4 <1> 15-17 Advanced Science Course Sequences Choose one of the sequences of eight to 10 units: (1) Chemistry 112A, 112B, Organic Chemistry (for students who did not take Chemistry 3A, 3B) (2) Chemistry 120A, 120B, 125 (3) Nine units from: Earth and Planetary Science 101, 105, 108, 116, 117, 124 (4) Earth and Planetary Science 180, 181, 182 (5) Nine units from: Environmental Science Policy and Management 102A, 103, 111, 112, 120, 126, 128, 131 (6) MCB 102, 112/112L <Optional> Freshman Seminar or E 92 (Survey Course) Approved Cluster Courses 2 Biology: MCB 112 and 112L, 113, 114, 116, 130, 130L, 148; Plant and Microbial Biology 120, 120L, 150, 150L, 180 Ecology: Environmental Science Policy and Management 103, 104; Integrative Biology 149, 149L, 151, 151L, 152, 153, 153L, 154, 154L, 162, 166 Energy: Architecture 140; CE 106, 107, 108; Energy Resources Group 280, ME 109, 140, 146 Geoengineering: CE 171, 173, 175, 176, C178, C172, 281 Policy Tools: 4 Economics C103, 104, 118, 126, 141, C142; Political Science 131A; Sociology 105, 106 Process Engineering: Chem E 140, 142, 150B, 154, 170, 170L, 171 Resources Engineering: CE 101, 103, 107, 113, 114, 115; Earth and Planetary Science 180; Environmental Science Policy and Management 128; ME 140; NE 124 1 The Humanities/Social Studies (H/SS) requirement includes two approved reading and composition courses and four additional approved courses, with which a number of specific conditions must be satisfied. This chart shows the courses in recommended order, but in most cases H/SS courses can be taken at any time during the program as long as prerequisites are met. See coe.berkeley.edu/hssreq for complete details and a list of approved courses. 2 The 12 units of cluster courses are in addition to engineering and science courses used to fulfill other requirements of the program. See approved cluster course list for options. 3 Two courses and associated laboratories from: 4-5 Physics 7C, Biology 1A and AL, Chemistry 3A and 3AL, Chemistry 3B and 3BL, Earth and Planetary Science 50 E 177 – Advanced Programming with MATLAB Second Additional Humanities/Social Studies Course1 Total Junior Year CE 111 – Environmental Engineering Advanced Mathematics: Math 121A and 121B; Math 110 and 128A; Statistics 101 and 102; Statistics 134 and 135; or E 117 and 170 3-4 16-17 3 3-4 14-16 3 3-5 Environmental Fluid Mechanics: CE 101, 103, 173; Earth and Planetary Science 105, C129/ Environmental Science Policy and Management C129, or 181 Fluid Mechanics: CE 100, Chem E 150A, or ME 106 Mechanics: CE 130N or ME 104 Thermodynamics: Chem E 141, E 115, or ME 105B Cluster course Total Senior Year Advanced Science Sequence3 Cluster Courses2 Fourth Additional Humanities/Social Studies Course1 Free Electives Total 4 6 3 13 2 3 3 3 3 3-4 15-17 3 3-4 15-18 4 3 3-4 4 14-15 Third and Fourth Humanities/Social Studies Courses1 See Advanced Science Course Sequence. Choose one of the sequences of eight to 10 units. 4 The following policy courses are recommended for fulfilling the H/SS requirements: Environmental Economics and Policy 161 – Advanced Topics in Environmental and Resources Economics; Environmental Economics and Policy 162 – Economics of Water Resources; Econ 125 – Economics of the Environment; Energy and Resources Group 100 – Energy and Society; Energy and Resources Group 151 – Politics of Energy and Environmental Policy; Public Policy 101 – Introduction to Public Policy Analysis; Public Policy 158 – Risk and Uncertainty in Public Policy; Public Policy 175 – Science and Technology Policy. *A minimum of 120 units is required for graduation. 30 Engineering — Undeclared 308 McLaughlin Hall #1702 (510) 642-7594 coe.berkeley.edu/engineering-undeclared Sample Program for Engineering — Undeclared Freshman Year Chemistry 1A – General Chemistry or Chemistry 4A – General Chemistry and Quantitative Analysis E 7, Introduction to Applied Computing1 E 10, Engineering Design and Analysis Mathematics 1A – Calculus Mathematics 1B – Calculus Physics 7A, Physics for Scientists and Engineers Reading and Composition Course from List A E 92 – Prespectives in Engineering Total Sophomore Year Mathematics 53 – Multivariable Calculus Mathematics 54 – Linear Algebra and Differential Equations Physics 7B, Physics for Scientists and Engineers First Additional Humanities/Social Studies Course Electives (Fall)3 Electives (Spring)3 Total 15-16 2 2 Fall 4 3 4 4 1 16 4 4 3-4 see your advisers Spring 4 4 4 4 16 4 see your advisers 13-16 Program Overview The engineering-undeclared lower division program is for students who are interested in pursuing an engineering education but are undecided on a particular major within the college. Students admitted to the program enjoy the benefit of an advising team comprised of a student affairs adviser who works exclusively with undeclared students and faculty from each major. Together they help students in the program explore their academic interests, understand and complete requirements and select a major. The common first year engineering curriculum is supplemented with introductory seminars and courses intended to generate enthusiasm for and develop a better understanding of the different engineering fields. Students admitted to the program must declare a major by the end of their fourth semester, and if in good academic standing may choose from any of the College of Engineering majors. Reading and Composition Course from List B2 1 Intended electrical engineering and computer sciences majors should discuss this requirement with their advisers. CS 61A may be a more appropriate choice. 2 The Humanities/Social Studies (H/SS) requirement includes two approved reading and composition courses and four additional approved courses, with which a number of specific conditions must be satisfied. This chart shows the courses in recommended order, but in most cases H/SS courses can be taken at any time during the program as long as prerequisites are met. See coe.berkeley.edu/hssreq for complete details and a list of approved courses. 3 Students should choose these requirements with their student affairs and faculty advisers based upon their intended major(s). Industrial Engineering and Operations Research 4141 Etcheverry Hall #1777 (510) 642-5484 ieor.berkeley.edu Chair: Ilan Adler, Ph.D. Undergraduate Program The undergraduate program in the Department of Industrial Engineering and Operations Research is designed to prepare students for technical careers in production or service industries; alternatively, it provides a strong foundation for those headed for engineering management positions, as well as those intending to go on to specialized graduate study in operations research, industrial engineering, or business administration. The core of the program includes basic science, mathematics, including probability and statistics, and engineering, followed by courses in optimization and stochastic models. These courses form the methodological foundation for upper division IEOR electives involving the analysis and design of production and service systems, information systems, and human work systems and organization, among others. The senior project enables the student to integrate knowledge acquired in other courses and apply it to the solution of actual problems from local industrial firms and government agencies. The mission of the Department of Industrial Engineering and Operations Research is to educate students to become highly proficient in: • the quantitative modeling and analysis of a broad array of systems-level decision problems concerned with economic efficiency, productivity, and quality; • the development and creative use of analytical and computational methods for solving these problems; • the collection and analysis of data, and the use of database and decision-support tools; • the comprehension of modeling and uncertainty; and • to obtain the broader skills, background, and knowledge necessary to be an effective professional in a rapidly changing global economy. The undergraduate program is accredited under the guidelines for industrial engineering programs by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology, 111 Market Place, Suite 1050, Baltimore, MD 212024012; telephone: (410) 347-7700. Industrial Engineering and Operations Research Department Overview The Department of Industrial Engineering and Operations Research combines two closelyrelated professions concerned with the efficient operation of complex systems. The industrial engineering profession involves the design, organization, implementation, and economic operation of integrated production and service systems using people, materials, and equipment. Areas of application include not only the basic manufacturing and high technology production processes essential to our economy but also service organizations such as banks, health care facilities, libraries, and government agencies. Operations research emphasizes the basic understanding of the functioning of complex systems of technology and management through the development and analysis of mathematical models for the purpose of predicting system behavior and/ or optimizing system performance, under economic and technological constraints. In addition to production and service systems described above, application areas include engineering systems such as transportation, energy production and delivery, construction management, and resource extraction; sociotechnological problems such as urban services, environmental planning, waste management, and law enforcement systems; and management areas such as financial and investment analysis, resource allocation, risk analysis, and manpower planning. Both professions require a sound preparation in the mathematical sciences such as probability, statistics, and optimization theory, as well as training in economic principles, human performance and organization, and the use of computers to analyze and/or simulate systems. Elective studies can emphasize a particular area of technology or can be broadly based in either management systems or decision methodology. 32 The department offers a certificate program in logistics, which is cosponsored by the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering. The department also participates in the management of the technology certificate program, which is jointly sponsored by the College of Engineering and Haas School of Business. The certificate programs are designed to provide focus on courses and campus activities related to logistics and the management of technology, respectively. Students enrolled in an M.S. or an M.Eng. program in either department can meet the certificate requirements by a judicious choice of electives without increasing the total number of credit hours toward their master’s degree. Students enrolled in other departments are welcome to participate in the programs. You may obtain further information about graduate programs in this department by exploring our web site or contacting the department office. Facilities Another program, which combines some of the requirements of the departmental major with those of other majors, deals with manufacturing engineering, a joint offering with the Department of Mechanical Engineering. This program is more tightly structured and offers fewer electives than the major. On the other hand, those students who have particular interests in manufacturing can broaden career opportunities with little or no loss of time. At the master’s level, students may emphasize applied courses, preparing them for professional practice or may follow a more theoretical program intended for those who will pursue doctoral studies. In doctoral programs, students investigate additional major topics in-depth, as well as study two minor fields. A minor may augment the major in several ways, such as to provide a deeper understanding of the theory underlying portions of the major field, or to introduce an area of potential applications. The paramount requirement of a doctoral degree is the successful completion of a thesis on a subject within the major field. Research areas may include the investigation of the mathematical foundations of, and computational methods for, optimization or stochastic models, including risk analysis. Research also may be undertaken to develop methodologies for the design, planning, and/ or control of systems in a variety of application domains, including manufacturing, distribution, material handling, transportation, power generation, health care, financial services, information services, and governmental services. Graduate students are expected to become proficient in the use of computers. Students should be able to quickly construct simple computer programs and to use software libraries and applications for such tasks as data analysis, optimization, and large scale system simulation. The Department of Industrial Engineering and Operations Research has several computing facilities and laboratories: three instructional microcomputer laboratories equipped with a network of Pentium-based personal computers and an advanced computer-applications laboratory equipped with industry-standard software applications. The department also shares several computing facilities that are equipped with microcomputers and workstations. All the workstations are linked on a network connected to the central campus computers. IEOR students also have access to the VLSI microfabrication facility for research in computerintegrated manufacturing systems. Industrial Engineering and Operations Research Minor The department offers a minor in industrial engineering and operations research that is open to all students not majoring in IEOR who have completed the necessary prerequisites for the minor requirements. Information is available at the department office. Graduate Study Applicants to the graduate programs in Industrial Engineering and Operations Research should have a bachelor’s degree in engineering, physical science, mathematics, or other fields that provide sufficient mathematical preparation. Program in Industrial Engineering and Operations Research Freshman Year Chemistry 1A – General Chemistry or Chemistry 4A – General Chemistry and Quantitative Analysis E 7 – Introduction to Applied Computing E 10 – Engineering Design and Analysis Mathematics 1A – Calculus Mathematics 1B – Calculus Physics 7A – Physics for Scientists and Engineers Reading and Composition Course from List A 1 117-124 Units Fall 4 3 4 4 <1> 15-16 4 4 3 3-4 14-15 3 3 3 3 3-4 15-16 3 6 6 15 Spring 4 4 4 4 16 3 4 1 3 3-4 14-15 3 3 3 3 3-4 15-16 4 6 3-5 13-15 1 The Humanities/Social Studies (H/SS) requirement includes two approved reading and composition courses and four additional approved courses, with which a number of specific conditions must be satisfied. This chart shows the courses in recommended order, but in most cases H/SS courses can be taken at any time during the program as long as prerequisites are met. See coe.berkeley.edu/hssreq for complete details and a list of approved courses. 2 Transfer students who did not complete an approved E10 equivalent course prior to admission must take an approved course (3 units minimum) treating engineering technology, design or analysis. See your student affairs adviser in 305 McLaughlin for details. 3 Engineering Breadth: 6 units must be completed from the following list: BioE 102; CE 11, C30, 60, 70, 155; E 28, 36, 45, 115; EE 40 (or 42 or 100); MSE 111, ME 40, C85, 132. 4 Students must take a minimum of six courses chosen from the categories listed below, including a minimum of three courses from Category A and a minimum of one course from Category B: Category A IEOR 130 – Methods of Manufacturing Improvement IEOR 166 – Decision Analysis IEOR 150 – Production Systems Analysis IEOR 151 – Service Operations Design and Analysis IEOR 153 – Facilities Planning and Design 33 2 Reading and Composition Course from List B1 <Optional> Freshman Seminar or E 92 (Survey Course) Total Sophomore Year E 120 – Engineering Economics Mathematics 53 – Multivariable Calculus Mathematics 54 – Linear Algebra and Differential Equations Physics 7B – Physics for Scientists and Engineers Self Pace Programming Course (see note #1) Engineering Breadth3 First and Second Additional Humanities/Social Studies Course1 Total Junior Year IEOR 131– Computer Simulation of Industrial Engineering Systems IEOR 160 – Operations Research I IEOR 161 – Operations Research II IEOR 162 – Linear Programming IEOR 165 – Engineering Statistics, Quality Control and Forecasting IEOR 172 – Probability and Risk Analysis for Engineering or Statistics 134 – Concepts of Probability IEOR Electives4 Third and Fourth Additional Humanities/Social Studies Course1 Total Senior Year E 190 – Technical Communication IEOR 180 – Senior Project IEOR Electives4 Unrestricted Electives (9 units minimum) Total Category B IEOR 115 – Industrial and Commercial Data Systems IEOR 140 – Industrial Production and Design (the prerequisite is a course in Java programming equivalent to CS 9G.) IEOR 170 – Human Factors for Engineering Design IEOR 171 – Introduction to Design of Human Work Systems and Organization Additional requirements/Notes: (1) A course in Computer Programming must be completed by the end of your sophomore year: CS 9C, 9F, 9G, or any equivalent course work (with evaluation and approved petition) is acceptable. CS 9G is a prerequisite for IEOR 140. (2) No course can be used to satisfy simultaneously two requirements. (3) IEOR 172 is an alternative course for Statistics 134. In semesters when both are offered, we recommend you take IEOR 172. Students may not receive credit for both Statistics 134 and IEOR 172. IEOR 172 cannot be used to fulfill any engineering unit or elective requirements. It can only be used as a statistics course. (4) The IEOR 190 series courses cannot be used to fulfill any engineering requirements (units, courses, technical electives or otherwise). *A minimum of 120 units is required for graduation. 34 Manufacturing Engineering Program Overview Manufacturing engineering is an interdisciplinary undergraduate program offered jointly by the Departments of Industrial Engineering and Operations Research and Mechanical Engineering. The emphasis of the program is on how to manufacture products of high quality, including machinery design, plant layout, employee supervision, and economic analysis. The program demands creativity and the ability to solve problems and communicate effectively. Course topics include computer-aided manufacturing, robotics and automated machining, production systems analysis, properties of materials, systems design and synthesis, reliability, optimization, quality management, and manufacturing processes. These fundamentals are applied to a variety of manufacturing industries, including integrated circuit, automobile, steel, and electronics. Undergraduate Program in Manufacturing Engineering Freshman Year Chemistry 1A – General Chemistry or Chemistry 4A – General Chemistry and Quantitative Analysis E 7 – Introduction to Applied Computing E 10 – Engineering Design and Analysis Mathematics 1A – Calculus Mathematics 1B – Calculus Physics 7A – Physics for Scientists and Engineers Reading and Composition Course from List A Total Sophomore Year E 28 – Graphic Communication in Engineering Mathematics 53 – Multivariable Calculus Mathematics 54 – Linear Algebra and Differential Equations ME 40 – Thermodynamics ME C85 – Introduction to Solid Mechanics Physics 7B – Physics for Scientists and Engineers 1 1 123-131 Units Fall 4 3 4 4 15 3 4 4 14-15 3 4 3 3 14 3 3 3-4 3-6 3-4 15-20 Spring 4 4 4 4 16 4 3 3 6-8 16-18 3 4 3 3 4 17 3 4 3 6 16 Reading and Composition Course from List B1 First, Second and Third Additional Humanities/Social Studies Courses 3-4 Total Junior Year 1 Social Studies (H/SS) requirement includes two approved reading and composition courses and four additional approved courses, with which a number of specific conditions must be satisfied. This chart shows the courses in recommended order, but in most cases H/SS courses can be taken at any time during the program as long as prerequisites are met. See coe. berkeley.edu/hssreq for complete details and a list of approved courses. 2 Choose two courses from each of the following two groups: Group 1 ME 102A – Experimentation and Measurement ME 106 – Fluid Mechanics ME 109 – Heat Transfer ME 110– Introduction to Product Development ME 128 – Computer-Aided Mechanical Design ME 130 – Design of Planar Machinery ME 133 – Mechanical Vibrations ME 134 – Automatic Control Systems ME 135 – Design of Microprocessor-Based Mechanical Systems ME 132 – Dynamic Systems and Feedback Group 2: IEOR 115 – Industrial and Commercial Data Systems IEOR 131 – Computer Simulation of Industrial Engineering Systems IEOR 161 – Operations Research IEOR 162 – Linear Programming IEOR 166 – Decision Analysis IEOR 170 – Human Factors for Engineering IEOR 171 – Introduction to Design & Supply Chain Management Electives must include the following: The Humanities/ E 120 – Principles of Engineering Economy EE 100 – Electronic Techniques for Engineering IEOR 130 – Modeling and Simulation of Dynamic Systems IEOR 140 – Introduction to Industrial Production Methods IEOR 160 – Operations Research I or IEOR 162 – Linear Programming IEOR 172 – Probability and Risk Analysis for Engineers or Statistics 134 – Concepts of Probability ME 101 – Manufacturing Systems ME 104 – Engineering Mechanics II (Dynamics) ME 108 – Mechanical Behavior of Engineering Materials Total Senior Year IEOR 150 – Production Systems Analysis IEOR 153 – Facilities Planning and Design IEOR 165 – Forecasting, Quality Control, and Quality Assurance ME 102B, Mechanical Engineering Design or IEOR 180, Senior Project ME 122 – Processing of Materials in Manufacturing Technical Electives Total 2 Fourth Additional Humanities/Social Studies Course1 Materials Science and Engineering 210 Hearst Memorial Mining Building #1760 (510) 642-3801 mse.berkeley.edu Chair: Robert O. Ritchie, Sc.D. Chemical and Electrochemical Materials Science and Engineering This area comprises both the chemical and electrochemical processing of materials and the chemical and electrochemical behavior of materials. The former includes the scientific and engineering principles utilized in mineral processing, smelting, leaching and refining materials, along with numerous etching and deposition techniques. The latter includes the environmental degradation of materials, the compatibility of materials with specific environments, and the fundamental science and engineering development of materials used in advanced energy storage devices. Materials Science and Engineering Department Overview The Department of Materials Science and Engineering administers undergraduate and graduate programs in materials science and engineering. In addition, undergraduate students may be admitted to one of several joint major programs. Materials science and engineering encompasses all natural and man-made materials — their extraction, synthesis, processing, properties, characterization, and development for technological uses. Advanced engineering activities that depend upon optimized materials include the medical device and healthcare industries, electronics and photonics, transportation, advanced batteries and fuel cells, and the emerging field of nanotechnology. Students in materials science and engineering apply a basic foundation of mathematics, chemistry, physics, and engineering to fields of specialization that include: biomaterials; electronic, magnetic, and optical materials; materials for energy technologies; structural materials; chemical and electrochemical materials science and engineering; and computational materials science and engineering. Nanoscale science and engineering plays a important role in all of these specializations. Computational Materials Science and Engineering Computational methods are becoming increasingly useful in all facets of materials science and engineering. Such methods range from the theoretical prediction of the electronic and structural properties of materials to modeling fluid flow in advanced batteries or the chemical kinetics and equilibria in a materials-processing operation. Electronic, Magnetic and Optical Materials This group of materials is defined by its functionality. Semiconductors, metals, and ceramics are used today to form highly complex systems, such as integrated electronic circuits, optoelectronic devices, and magnetic and optical mass storage media. In intimate contact, these various materials, with precisely controlled properties, perform numerous functions, including the acquisition, processing, transmission, storage, and display of information. Materials research in this area combines the fundamental principles of solid state physics and chemistry with electrical engineering, chemical engineering, and materials science and engineering. Biomaterials Traditionally, biomaterials encompass synthetic alternatives to the native materials found in the human body. A central limitation in the performance of traditional materials used in the medical device, biotechnological, and pharmaceutical industries is that they lack the ability to integrate with biological systems through either a molecular or cellular pathway, which has relegated biomaterials to a passive role dictated by the constituents of a particular environment, leading to unfavorable outcomes and device failure. The design and synthesis of materials that circumvent their passive behavior in complex mammalian cells is the focus of the work conducted within the MSE department at UC Berkeley. Materials for Energy Technologies Materials play a crucial enabling role in the energy technologies. All facets of energy harvesting, conversion, storage, delivery, and conservation are included in this topic. Specific examples include photovoltaics, nuclear materials, thermoelectrics, fuel cells, mechanical transducers, batteries, low-loss conductors, low-density structural materials for weight savings, and integrated materials systems for automated control of energy utilization. Technical courses relevant to this field of study are selected from undergraduate offerings in Materials Science and Engineering, Chemical Engineering, Nuclear Engineering, and Mechanical Engineering, and one course on energy policy may also be included. 36 Nanomaterials The science of materials at the nanoscale provides a rich scholarly focus at the confluence of basic science (physics, chemistry, biology, and mathematics) and the engineering disciplines. This interdisciplinary focus will provide undergraduates with a comprehensive view of the key materials science issues in nanoscience and nanotechnology. Several courses on nanoscale processing, characterization, and computational approaches to understand nanomaterials are being offered under this concentration. Structural Materials This area focuses on the relationships between the chemical and physical structure of materials and their properties and performance. Regardless of the material class — metallic, ceramic, polymeric, or composite — an understanding of structure-property relationships provides a scientific basis for developing engineering materials for advanced applications. Fundamental and applied research in this field respond to an ever-increasing demand for improved or better-characterized materials. Undergraduate Program Undergraduate students in the MSE curriculum pursue a program that applies the principles of mathematics, physics, chemistry, and engineering to materials systems. The program emphasizes the relationships among these underlying principles and the structure, properties, processing, and performance of materials. Students learn to apply and integrate their understanding of materials structure, properties, processing, and performance to materials selection and design problems. The program introduces relevant experimental and computational methods and includes technical electives. Courses selected to satisfy these requirement are chosen to emphasize biomaterials, electronic materials, materials physic and chemistry, structural materials, energy, technology, nanomaterials, or follow a general emphasis. Materials Science and Engineering Minor The department offers a minor in materials science and engineering that is open to all students not majoring in MSE who have completed the necessary prerequisites for the minor requirements. Information is available at the department office. Facilities Instruction and research in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering are supported by excellent and extensive facilities located on the Berkeley campus and within the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). Campus facilities for materials synthesis and characterization are found in Hearst Memorial Mining Building, Berkeley’s Microfabrication Laboratory, and the Integrated Materials Laboratory. At Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, several unique facilities used by materials scientists and engineers are found in the Materials Sciences Division (MSD), at the National Center for Electron Microscopy (NCEM), the Advanced Light Source (ALS), and the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC). Further details on these and other facilities for teaching and research can be found by visiting the department’s web site. Graduate Study Qualified holders of the bachelor’s degree in fields such as materials science and engineering, ceramic engineering, metallurgy, physics, chemistry, and various fields of engineering can all successfully undertake graduate study in materials science. A combination of course work and research normally leads to the M.S., M.Eng., and Ph.D. degrees, qualifying the graduate for a wide range of positions in industry, governmental organizations, or universities that entail research or engineering in the production, development, and use of materials. The course work includes a core program in materials science and engineering, along with additional courses that provide breadth. Topics for graduate research include studies in biomaterials, electronic, magnetic and optical materials, structural materials, chemical and electrochemical materials science and engineering, and computational materials science and engineering. There is also a designated emphasis in nanoscale science and engineering (see the “NSE” section of this announcement). Joint Major Programs The department offers five joint major programs that combine study in materials science and engineering with bioengineering, electrical engineering and computer sciences, mechanical engineering, nuclear engineering, or chemical engineering. See the “Joint Majors” section of this announcement for descriptions and detailed curricula for each joint major. 1 The Humanities/Social Studies (H/SS) requirement includes two approved reading and composition courses and four additional approved courses, with which a number of specific conditions must be satisfied. This chart shows the courses in recommended order, but in most cases H/SS courses can be taken at any time during the program as long as prerequisites are met. See coe.berkeley.edu/hssreq for complete details and a list of approved courses. 2 Technical electives must include at least 21 units of upper division courses and may be chosen from a single area of technical emphasis: Biomaterials, Electronic Materials; Energy Technology; Materials Physics and Chemistry; Nanomaterials; Structural Materials; or a general emphasis that includes an integrated course sequence in another engineering field, physics, chemistry, or mathematics. The 21 units of upperdivision courses cannot include: any course taken on a P/NP basis; BioE 100; CS 194, 195, C195; E 100, 110, C111, 124, 130AC, 140, 191, 193, 195, 196; EE 194; IEOR 190 series. Undergraduate Program in Materials Science and Engineering Core Program Freshman Year Chemistry 1A – General Chemistry or Chemistry 4A – General Chemistry and Quantitative Analysis E 7 – Introduction to Applied Computing E 10 – Engineering Design and Analysis Mathematics 1A – Calculus Mathematics 1B – Calculus Physics 7A – Physics for Scientists and Engineers Reading and Composition Course from List A1 Reading and Composition Course from List B Total Sophomore Year Chemistry 1B – General Chemistry or Chemistry 4B – General Chemistry and Quantitative Analysis E 45 – Properties of Materials Mathematics 53 – Multivariable Calculus Mathematics 54 – Linear Algebra and Differential Equations ME C85 – Introduction to Solid Mechanics Physics 7B – Physics for Scientists and Engineers Physics 7C – Physics for Scientists and Engineers First and Second Additional Humanities/Social Studies Courses1 Total Junior Year E 115 – Engineering Thermodynamics E 117 – Methods of Engineering Analysis MSE 102 – Bonding, Crystallography and Crystal Defects MSE 103 – Phase Transformations and Kinetics MSE 104 – Characterization of Materials MSE 111 – Properties of Electronic Materials Third and Fourth Additional Humanities/Social Studies Courses1 Technical Electives2 Total Senior Year MSE 112 – Corrosion MSE 113 – Mechanical Behavior of Materials MSE 130 – Experimental Materials Science MSE 151 – Polymeric Materials Technical Electives2 Total 3 3 3 6 15 4 3 3 3-4 3 16-17 4 3 4 6-8 17-19 1 122-128 Units Fall 4 3 4 4 <1> 15-16 Spring 4 4 4 4 <1> 15-16 4 3 4 4 15 3 4 4 3-4 3 17-18 3 9 12 37 <Optional> Freshman Seminar or E 92 (Survey Course) 38 Biomaterials Emphasis Junior Year Core Program plus the following: Fall 1 Structural Materials Emphasis Core Program plus the following: Spring 3 3 9 9 Junior Year MSE 122 – Ceramic Processing Courses approved for emphasis in Structural Materials5 Total Senior Year 6 6 CE 131 – Advanced Mechanics of Materials ME 127 – Composite Materials: Analysis, Design, Manufacture Courses approved for emphasis in Structural Materials5 Total Fall 3 3 3 3 6 Spring 3 3 3 6 9 3 3 6 9 9 3 3 3 3 3 3 Technical electives approved for emphasis in Biomaterials MSE C118 – Biological Performance of Materials Total Senior Year Courses approved for emphasis in Biomaterials1 Total Electronic Materials Emphasis Core Program plus the following: Junior Year MSE 117 – Properties of Dielectric and Magnetic Materials2 Courses approved for emphasis in Electronic Materials2,3 Total Senior Year MSE 123, Semiconductor Processing MSE 125, Thin-Film Materials Science Courses approved for emphasis in Electronic Materials2,3 Total 1 Technical electives in the Biomaterials emphasis must include one (1) MSE 120 series course and the remaining courses from the following approved list. (Consult the General Catalog for prerequisites.) Substitution of courses not on this list requires adviser approval. Chem E 170A-170B – Biochemical Engineering Chemistry 112A-112B – Organic Chemistry Chemistry C130/Molecular and Cell Biology C100A – Biophysical Chemistry: Physical Principles and the Molecules of Life Chemistry 130B – Biophysical Chemistry ME C176 – Orthopaedic Biomechanics Molecular and Cell Biology 100B – Biophysical Chemistry: Physical Principles and the Molecules of Life Molecular and Cell Biology 102 – Survey of the Principles of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Molecular and Cell Biology 110 – Molecular Biology: Macromolecular Synthesis and Cellular Function 2 MSE 117 is offered in the spring of odd-numbered years. Students take this course during their junior or senior year, depending upon when MSE 117 is available. 3 Technical electives in the Electronic Materials emphasis must be taken from the following approved list. (Consult the General Catalog for prerequisites.) Substitution of courses not listed below requires adviser approval. EE 100 – Electronic Techniques for Engineering, (or EE 40 – Introduction to Microelectronic Circuits if taken as a sophomore) EE 130 – Integrated-Circuit Devices MSE 120 series course (other than 123 and 125) Physics 137A-137B – Quantum Mechanics Physics 141A-141B – Solid-State Physics 4 Elective in the Materials Physics and Chemistry Emphasis must include one (1) MSE 120 series course and the remaining units from the following approved list. (Consult General Catalog for prerequisites.) Substitution of courses not listed below requires adviser approval. Chemistry 104A and/or 104B – Advanced Inorganic Chemistry Chemistry 105 – Instrumental Methods in Analytical Chemistry Chemistry 120A and/or 120B – Physical Chemistry Chemistry 125 – Physical Chemistry Laboratory Chemistry 112A and/or 112B and/or 112H – Organic Chemistry MSE 117 – Dielectric, Magnetic and Optical Properties of Materials Physics 110A and/or 110B – Electromagnetism and Optics Physics 112 – Introduction to Statistical and Thermal Physics Physics 137A-137B – Quantum Mechanics Physics 141A-141B – Solid-State Physics 5 Electives in the Structural Materials emphasis must include one (1) MSE 120 series course and the remaining units from the following approved list. (Consult General Catalog for prerequisites.) Substitution of courses not on this list requires advisor approval. CE 120 – Structural Engineering CE 122 – Design of Steel Structures CE 140 – Failure Mechanisms in Civil Engineering Materials ME C117 – Structural Aspects of Biomaterials ME C223 – Polymer Engineering MSE C214 – Micromechanics Materials Physics and Chemistry Emphasis Core Program plus the following: Junior Year Courses approved for emphasis in Materials Physics and Chemistry4 Total Senior Year Courses approved for emphasis in Materials Physics and Chemistry4 Total 6 6 9 9 Fall 3 3 Spring 3 3 Energy Technology Emphasis Core Program plus the following: Junior Year MSE 136 – Materials in Energy Technologies Courses approved for emphasis in Energy Technologies Total Senior Year Courses approved for emphasis in Energy Technology1 Total 1 1 Nanomaterials Emphasis Core Program plus the following: Fall 4 4 6 6 Spring 3 3 9 9 Junior Year EE 143 – Microfabrication Technology MSE 140 – Nanomaterials for Scientists and Engineers Total Senior Year MSE 125 – Thin-Film Materials Science Courses approved for emphasis in Nanomaterials1 Total 6 6 3 6 9 Fall 4 4 Spring 4 4 39 Electives in the Energy Technology Emphasis must include one (1) MSE 120 series course; at least six (6) units in the topic of “energy and society,” taken from the following approved list. (Consult the General Catalog for prerequisites.) CE 107 – Climate Change Mitigation Earth and Planetary Science 170AC – Crossroads of Earth Resources and Society Earth and Planetary Science C180 – Air Pollution; Energy Resources Group 100 – Energy and Society Energy Resources Group 151 – Politics of Energy and Environmental Policy and at least six (6) units in “energy generation and conversion,” taken from the following approved list. (Consult the General Catalog for prerequisites.) Chem E 176 – Principles of Electrochemical Processes NE 161 – Nuclear Power Engineering NE 180 – Introduction to Controlled Fusion The remaining three (3) units may be taken from either topical area. Substitution of courses not on this list requires adviser approval. 1 Electives in the Nanomaterials emphasis must be taken from the following approved list. (Consult the General Catalog for prerequisites.) Substitution of courses not on this list requires adviser approval. Chem E 179 – Process Technology of Solid State Materials Devices ME 118 – Introduction to Nanotechnology and Nanoscience ME 119 – Introduction to Microelectromechanical Systems General Emphasis Core Program plus the following: Junior Year Technical Electives1 Total Senior Year Technical Electives1 Total 6 6 9 9 Fall 3 3 Spring 3 3 1 Technical electives in the General Emphasis must include one (1) MSE 120 series course and eighteen (18) additional units of upper division technical electives, chosen to meet individual educational objectives. A minimum of three (3) courses, selected in agreement with the faculty adviser, should constitute an integrated program in another engineering field, physics, chemistry, or mathematics. The technical electives cannot include: any course taken on a P/NP basis; BioE 100; CS 194, 195, C195; E 100, 110, C111, 124, 130AC, 140, 191, 193, 195, 196; EE 194; IEOR 190 series. 40 Mechanical Engineering 6141 Etcheverry Hall #1760 (510) 642-1338 me.berkeley.edu Chair: Albert P. Pisano, Ph.D. Joint Major Programs The department offers two joint major programs with either the Department of Nuclear Engineering or the Department of Materials Science and Engineering. See the Joint Majors section of this announcement for detailed descriptions and curricula. Department Overview Mechanical engineers serve society by solving problems in transportation, energy, the environment, and human health. The activity of mechanical engineers extends from investigation of physical phenomena governing the behavior of our surroundings to the manufacture and evaluation of products. The technical domain of the mechanical engineering profession encompasses topic areas, including acoustics, automatic control, bioengineering, combustion, cryogenics, design, dynamics, energy conversion, engines, environment, heat transfer, lubrication, mass transfer, manufacturing, materials processing, mechanics of solids and fluids, mechanisms, petroleum, plasma dynamics, propulsion, thermodynamics, vibration, and wave propagation. Mechanical Engineering Minor The department offers a minor in mechanical engineering that is open to all students not majoring in ME who have completed the necessary prerequisites for the minor requirements. Information is available on the student information section of the mechanical engineering web site or at the department office. Graduate Study Increasing demands for technical competence in engineering make it advisable for many students of suitable scholarship to continue their studies for an advanced degree. The department offers a complete program of graduate study and research in both traditional and innovative areas within mechanical engineering. It also participates in several interdisciplinary programs. See the department web site for more information on graduate study. The major areas of study are bioengineering, computer mechanics, controls and dynamics, energy and the environment, fluid and solid mechanics, manufacturing process, materials and design, microelectromechanical systems (MEMS), nanosystems, ocean engineering, and thermodynamics. Active interdisciplinary programs include bioengineering and environmental engineering. Degrees offered are M.S., M.Eng., Ph.D., and D.Eng. A professional-type terminal M.S. degree is also offered. For further details and specific areas of concentration, please consult the graduate admission section of the mechanical engineering web site or contact the department. Undergraduate Program The undergraduate program in mechanical engineering seeks to provide students with a broad education emphasizing an excellent foundation in scientific and engineering fundamentals. Students are supplied with the tools to synthesize their engineering knowledge and apply it to the analysis of performance and design. The capstone of the program is the senior design experience, which assists in developing a deep understanding of the process. To meet the needs of its two primary constituencies — industry and mechanical engineering graduate programs — the objectives of the undergraduate program are to produce graduates who: • Vigorously engage in post-baccalaureate endeavors, whether in engineering graduate study, engineering practice, or the pursuit of other fields, such as science, law, medicine, business, or public policy • Apply their mechanical engineering education to address the full range of technical and societal problems with creativity, imagination, confidence, and responsibility. • Actively seek out positions of leadership within their profession and their community. • Serve as ambassadors for engineering by exhibiting the highest ethical and professional standards and communicating the importance and excitement of this dynamic field. This program is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology, 111 Market Place, Suite 1050, Baltimore, MD21202-4012; telephone: (410) 347-7700. Five Year B.S./M.S. Program For Berkeley mechanical engineering undergraduates only, the program allows our students to broaden their expertise in the major. It encourages an interdisciplinary focus, with concentrations in mechanical engineering and allied fields such as the sciences or other engineering tracks, as well as complimentary fields of study like business, law or public policy. It is structured to foster future leaders in industry with its focus on interdisciplinary technical skills as well as broader understanding of the legal and social contexts of technology development and use. Unlike our standard M.S.-only program, it is coursework only and students are not required to choose a specialized area of study. Students are also given a chance to choose between a comprehensive exam and a project report at the end of their studies. Facilities The Department of Mechanical Engineering maintains state of the art laboratories in Etcheverry Hall and Hesse Hall on campus, as well as the Richmond Field Station. Faculty and researchers collaborate extensively and share facilities with the Orthopaedic Surgery, Neurological Surgery, Radiology, and Medicine units at UC San Francisco; the VAMC in San Francisco; Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The department’s other state of the art facilities include: • The Automatic Control and Instrumentation Laboratory • The Berkeley Expert Systems Technology Laboratory • The Berkeley Instructional Technology Studio (BITS) • The Berkeley Manufacturing Institute. Five main laboratory areas comprise the BMI: (1) The Design Studio (2) The Computer-Aided Design and Manufacturing Laboratory (3) The Rapid Prototyping Studio (4) The Laboratory for Manufacturing and Sustainability (LMAS). The Precision Manufacturing Laboratory (5) The Integrated Manufacturing Laboratories • Laboratories devoted to bioengineering include: (1) The Biofluid Mechanics Laboratory (2) The Orthopaedic Biomechanics Laboratory (3) The Biomaterials Testing Facility (4) The Bio-Thermal Engineering Laboratory • The Combustion Laboratories • The Composite Materials Laboratory • The Computational Fluid Dynamics Laboratory • The Computational Marine Mechanics Laboratory (CMML) • The Computational Solid Mechanics Laboratory (CSML) • The Computer Mechanics Laboratory (CML) • The UC Berkeley Electro-Mechanical Design Laboratory • The Environmental Restoration Laboratory • The Fluid Mechanics Laboratories • The Heat and Mass Transfer Laboratory • The Human Engineering and Robotics Laboratory • The Impact and Biomechanics Laboratory • The Impact and Wave Propagation Laboratory • The Laser Thermal Laboratory • The Mechanical Behavior of Materials Laboratories • The MEMS Analysis and Design Laboratory • The Multiphase Transport Laboratory • The Nanobiology Laboratory • The Nanoengineering Laboratory (NanoLab) • The Nano/Microsystems Laboratory • The Richmond Model-Testing Facility • The Robotics and Motion Control Laboratory • The research conducted at the Surface Mechanics and Tribology Laboratory (SMTL) • The Telerobotics and Neurology Unit • The Transport in Porous Media Laboratories • The Vehicle Dynamics and Control Laboratory (VDL) • The Vibration and Dynamics Laboratories For more information on research facilities, see the laboratories section of the mechanical engineering web site. Mechanical Engineering 42 Undergraduate Program in Mechanical Engineering Freshman Year Chemistry 1A – General Chemistry or Chemistry 4A – General Chemistry and Quantitative Analysis E 7 – Introduction to Applied Computing1 E 10 – Engineering Design and Analysis1 Mathematics 1A – Calculus Mathematics 1B – Calculus Physics 7A – Physics for Scientists and Engineers Reading and Composition Course from List A2 Reading and Composition Course from List B Total Sophomore Year E 28 – Graphic Communication in Engineering Mathematics 53 – Multivariable Calculus Mathematics 54 – Linear Algebra and Differential Equations ME 40 – Thermodynamics ME C85 – Introduction to Solid Mechanics Physics 7B – Physics for Scientists and Engineers First and Second Additional Humanities/Social Studies Courses Total Junior Year EE 100 – Electronic Techniques for Engineering ME 104 – Engineering Mechanics II (Dynamics) ME 106 – Fluid Mechanics ME 108 – Mechanical Behavior of Engineering Materials ME 109 – Heat Transfer ME 132 – Dynamic Systems and Feedback Technical Electives3 Third and Fourth Additional Humanities/Social Studies Courses Total Senior Year E 190M – Technical Communication for Mechanical Engineers and ME 102A – Experimentation and Measurement ME 102B – Mechanical Engineering Design ME 107 – Mechanical Engineering Laboratory Technical Electives3 Upper Division Electives Total 4 2 2 118-125 Units* Fall 4 3 4 4 <1> 15-16 3 4 4 3-4 14-15 3 3 4 3 3-4 16-17 4 6 3-4 13-14 Spring 4 4 4 4 <1> 16-17 4 3 3 3-4 13-14 4 3 3 3 3-4 16-17 3 3 6 3 15 1 If prerequisites are met, students are encouraged to take E 7 during the fall and E 10 during the spring. 2 The Humanities/Social Studies (H/SS) requirement includes two approved reading and composition courses and four additional approved courses, with which a number of specific conditions must be satisfied. This chart shows the courses in recommended order, but in most cases H/SS courses can be taken at any time during the program as long as prerequisites are met. See coe.berkeley.edu/hssreq for complete details and a list of approved courses. 3 Technical Electives: 18 units of technical electives are required, of which at least 15 must be from upper-division elective mechanical engineeringsponsored courses. Of these 15 units, 3 units must be an elective design course selected from the following list: E 128 – Advanced Engineering Design Graphics ME 101 – High Mix/Low Volume Manufacturing ME 110 – Introduction to Product Development ME 119 – Introduction to MEMS ME 128 – Computer-Aided Mechanical Design ME 130 – Design of Planar Machinery ME 135 – Design of Microprocessor-Based Mechanical Sytems ME 142 – Heating, Air Conditioning, and Refrigeration ME 145 – Computer-Aided Thermal Design (if ME 145 is used as a quantitative science elective, it can also be used toward the 15 units of upper division ME units, but not as a design elective; another design course must be chosen from the approved list.) ME 165 – Ocean-Environment Mechanics Also, one of the technical elective courses must be taken from the quantitative science list below: E 117* – Methods of Engineering Analysis E 170 – Introduction to Modeling and Simulation E 177* – Advanced Programming with MATLAB Math 128A – Numerical Analysis ME 145* – Computer-Aided Thermal Design (if ME 145 is used as a quantitative science elective, it can also be used toward the 15 units of upper division ME units, but not as a design elective; another design course must be chosen from the approved list.) ME C180* – Engineering Analysis Using the Finite Element Method Four of these courses (noted with asterisks) are sponsored by mechanical engineering, and if taken can count simultaneously toward the 15 unit requirement and quantitative science requirement. Students can receive up to 3 units of technical elective credit for work on a research project in ME H194, Honors Undergraduate Research. Any upper division course taught by mechanical engineering faculty may be used as part of the 15 units of upperdivision mechanical engineering courses. The other technical elective units can be chosen from courses in engineering, physical science, mathematics, or statistics. Technical Electives cannot include: any course taken on a P/NP basis; BioE 100; CS 194, 195, C195; E 100, 110, C111, 124, 130AC, 140, 191, 193, 195, 196; EE 194; IEOR 190 series. Physical science is defined to include physics, chemistry, biochemistry, chemical engineering, and the biological sciences. Only one lower division course taken from the approved list of Lower Division Technical Electives can be used to satisfy part of the technical elective requirement. This list consists of the following courses: Astronomy 7A; Biology 1A, 1B; Chemistry 1B, 5; CE 70; Molecular and Cell Biology 11, 32 (32L not required); and Statistics 20, 25; or any lower division technical course required by another major in the College of Engineering. 4 Upper Division Electives: This course can be chosen at the student’s discretion. 2 <Optional> Freshman Seminar or E 92 (Survey Course) *A minimum of 120 units is required for graduation. Mechanical Engineering Options Electives Technical Electives The following groups of elective courses should help undergraduates focus on their specific professional goals. The electives need not be from any single group. Courses designated as special topics in the General Catalog and graduate level courses may require College approval by petition. Biomechanical Engineering: Biology 1A; BioE C212, C213, 214, 290A; EE C145B, 145L, 145M; Integrative Biology 131, 132; ME C117, 127, 133, 134, 135, 142, 166, C176; Molecular and Cell Biology 32*, 130 Combustion: CE 111; Chem E 140, 141, 142; E 117; ME 140, 151 Computer-Aided Engineering: E 128, 177; ME 128 Controls: E 177; EE 120, 128; ME 133, 134, 135, 146, 175, 190L, 190Y, 146 Energy: ME 140, 142, 145, 146 Environmental Engineering: CE 104N, 111, 173, 175; ME 110, 140, 142, 151, 165, 173; NE 162; Suggested non-technical courses: Architecture 100A, 100B, 140; Geography 144 Fluid Mechanics and Aeronautics: E 117; CE 131; ME 133, 134, 151, 163, 165, 167, 173, 175, 185 General Mechanical Engineering: E 117, 128; ME 110, 133, 134, 165, 173, 175 Heat and Mass Transfer: Chem E 150B, 171; E 117; ME 140, 142, 151 Materials Processing and Manufacturing Management: E 120; IEOR 115, 140, 170, 180; ME 101, 110, 122, 127, 128, 133, 134, 151 Mechanical Engineering Design: E 128; ME 110, 118, 119, 127, 128, 130, 133, 134, 135, 142, 151, 165, C176 Mechatronics: ME 101, 128, 130, 133, 134, 135 Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS): ME 118, 119 Nuclear Engineering: ME 134, 151, 173; NE 101, 120, 150; Physics 137A Ocean Engineering: ME 101, 127, 128, 134, 164, 165, 167; CE 120, 180 Robotics and Automation: EE C125; IEOR 140, 170; ME 101, 133, 134, 135, 170, 175 Theoretical and Applied Mechanics: E 117; Mathematics 104; ME 127, 133, 134, 163, 165, 170, 173, 175, C180, 185 * ME students are not required to take Molecular and Cell Biology 32L with Molecular and Cell Biology 32. 43 44 Nuclear Engineering 4153 Etcheverry Hall, #1730 (510) 642-5010 nuc.berkeley.edu Chair: Jasmina L. Vujic, Ph.D. • Possess solid knowledge of the fundamental mathematics and natural sciences (both physical and biological) that provide the foundation for engineering applications. • Understand nuclear processes and the application of general natural science and engineering principles to the analysis and design of nuclear and related systems of current and/or future importance to society. • Have strong independent learning, analytical, and problem-solving skills, with special emphasis on design, communication, and an ability to work in teams. • Understand the broad social, ethical, safety, and environmental context within which nuclear engineering is practiced. • Are aware of the importance of, and opportunities for, lifelong learning. The B.S. program in nuclear engineering is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology, 111 Market Place, Suite 1050, Baltimore, MD 21202-4012; telephone: (410) 347-7700. Department Overview Nuclear Engineering is concerned with the understanding of nuclear processes and their application in the energy, environmental, manufacturing, materials processing, and medical industries. The teaching and research programs encompass three broad areas: nuclear energy, nuclear waste and materials management, and bionuclear engineering and radiological physics. Much of the curriculum is devoted to the analysis, design, and development of fission and fusion power reactors; the nuclear fuel cycle, including radioactive waste management and disposal; and applications of nuclear science in instrumentation, radiation detection and protection, medical diagnosis and treatment, and materials behavior. Safety and environmental impacts are considered from a risk and systems viewpoint. Joint Major Programs Joint major programs are available with either the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences or the Department of Materials Science and Engineering. See the “Joint Majors” section of this announcement for detailed descriptions and curricula. Undergraduate Program The undergraduate curriculum in nuclear engineering is designed to prepare students for a career in industry, national laboratories, or state or federal agencies. The program leading to the B.S. in Nuclear Engineering emphasizes educational experience in several fields of engineering, leading to a concentration on nuclear engineering courses in the upper division. Students can choose one of two options: general nuclear engineering or bionuclear engineering. Rather than the degree in nuclear engineering, undergraduate students may instead elect a joint major degree program, which combines Nuclear Engineering with Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences, or with Materials Science and Engineering, or with Mechanical or Chemical Engineering. Compared with the single major program, the joint major programs are more strictly structured and offer fewer opportunities for nontechnical electives. On the other hand, they do afford ambitious students an opportunity to qualify in two fields of engineering with little or no loss in time during their undergraduate careers. Details on the joint major programs are to be found in the “Joint Majors” section of this announcement. The mission of the undergraduate program in nuclear engineering is to prepare our students to begin a lifetime of technical achievement and professional leadership in academia, government, national laboratories, and industry. To achieve this mission, the NE undergraduate program is designed to produce graduates who: Nuclear Engineering Minor The department offers a minor in nuclear engineering that is open to all students who are not majoring in NE and who have completed the necessary prerequisites for the minor requirements. Information is available at the department office. Graduate Study The graduate program is divisible into 11 areas, each representing an important aspect of nuclear technology. Coursework and research opportunities are available in each area. Applied Nuclear Physics Applied Nuclear Physics is concerned with the low-energy nuclear physics and interaction of radiation with matter important to nuclear chemistry, nuclear technology, and applications. Research programs include fundamental nuclear physics measurements for applied purposes and the development of advanced detectors and methodologies, in addition to the application of nuclear techniques in a wide range of studies. Current emphasis is on experimental and modeling studies in support of neutrino mass measurements, the design of methodologies and systems to counter the possible transport of clandestine nuclear materials, and applications in the biomedical and radiological sciences. Bionuclear and Radiological Physics This program is concerned with the biological effects of radiation, dosimetry, radiation shielding, radiation protection, and the development of methods based on the application of radiation for the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of illness and disease. Research is focused on medical imaging, boron neutron capture therapy, and radioactive tracers, computerized tomography, positron emission tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging. heating, reactor materials, fusion reactor neutronics, safety, and environmental impacts are analyzed. Experimental facilities for plasma research include the Berkeley Compact Toroid Experiment (BCTX) on the campus and several large collaborative efforts at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. The Rotating Target Neutron Source (RTNS), an accelerator-based fusion neutron source, is also on the Berkeley campus and is used for fusion neutron studies. Risk, Safety, and Systems Analysis This area of study is devoted to the development of methods and models and the acquisition of empirical data for assessing the impacts of large-scale technological systems on public health and safety, and on the environment. Basic research includes the development of deterministic models and the experimental data to support them, probabilistic methods and models, and optimization methods. An initial focus is on Generation IV nuclear energy systems, which integrate the nuclear fuel cycle in terms of high-level radioactive waste disposal, nuclear reactor safety, overall fuel cycle analysis and economics, and safeguards and security. Other complex large-scale systems considered include biological systems, ecological systems, information systems, and electric distribution systems. Nuclear Engineering Nuclear Thermal Hydraulics This area of study is devoted to improving the current understanding of heat and mass transfer, and fluid mechanics processes that transport energy and mass in nuclear systems and govern system performance and safety. Key phenomena studied include conduction, convection, and radiation heat transfer, phase change, and single- and multi-phase flows. In addition to water used to transport heat in present-day reactors, study in this area also covers gas, molten salt, and liquid metal coolants for advanced fission and fusion systems, as well as transport and mixing processes that occur inside reactor containment structures and in environmental systems. Nuclear Materials and Chemistry This area of study is devoted to understanding the many causes of materials degradation and failure in nuclear technology. Specific emphasis is on the behavior of nuclear fuels, cladding and structural materials in nuclear fission and fusion environments where radiation damage and corrosion are the overarching concerns. This research combines computational, experimental, and theoretical techniques to investigate the dynamic response of nuclear materials. The Nuclear Materials Laboratory uses thermogravimetric techniques with microbalances to investigate the hydriding and oxidation of nuclear reactor core materials and positron annihilation spectroscopy to characterize the microstructural changes in irradiated structural steels. In addition to understanding the performance of nuclear fuels and materials in current nuclear fission plants, the materials aspects of new fuel element designs and advanced nuclear fuels and structural material systems are investigated. Ethics and the Impact of Technology on Society This program focuses on the emerging ethical and technical issues arising in biotechnology, nanotechnology, information technology, and nuclear technology. The program examines how philosophy, religion and art, and natural and social science can shed light on these issues, as well as how individual and societal values are affected by these technologies. Further information may be obtained by consulting the web site or contacting the department. Laser, Particle Beam, and Plasma Technologies This area of study includes a broad spectrum of new technologies related to charged particles and fields. The topical areas range from interaction of lasers with plasmas to charged particle beam physics, to plasma technologies such as lighting and material processing discharges. Applications range from laser-plasma interactions to discharges for lighting, material modification and microelectronic fabrication; and from microwave-beam interactions for microwave sources and plasma heating to plasma devices such as thrusters, and ion and electron beam sources. Facilities The facilities of the department include the Nuclear Waste Research Laboratory, the Renewable and Appropriate Energy Laboratory (RAEL), the Advanced Nuclear Engineering Computational Laboratory, several research and teaching laboratories, and well-equipped mechanical and electronic shops. The neutronics laboratory includes the RTNS 14 Mev neutron source, a variety of radiation-analysis instrumentation, and subcritical multiplying assemblies. The RTNS is also being used for the study of boron-neutron capture therapy. Experimental facilities for the study of thermal problems include two-phase flow and transientboiling apparatus, and for the study of materials problems include a variety of equipment for high-temperature and high-vacuum experiments. Some nuclear engineering students participate in research at Lawrence Berkeley and Livermore National Laboratories, Los Alamos National Laboratory, and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). Energy and the Environment This program focuses on renewable and clean energy techniques, particularly solar, wind, and biomass sources. Research and teaching activities focus on the performance, efficiency, economics, and dissemination of these energy systems. The Renewable and Appropriate Energy Laboratory (RAEL) in Etcheverry Hall supports this program area. Fuel Cycles and Radioactive Waste This area of study is devoted to the development of methods and models (theoretical and/ or experimental) for analyzing processes that handle nuclear materials from cradle to grave. The methods and models developed are used for evaluating environmental impacts, economics, and proliferation resistance of a fuel cycle, and for designing an optimized fuel-cycle system. Basic research includes the development of deterministic models and the experimental data to support them, probabilistic methods and models, and optimization methods. An initial focus is on the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative, which aims at improved use of repository capacity for civilian-spent nuclear fuel from the current light-water reactors, with help of systems for separation and transmutation of problematic radionuclides. Fission Reactor Analysis Graduate study encompasses the synthesis of the basic components of nuclear technology in the engineering and design of nuclear reactors. Problems of heat removal, stress analysis, reactor dynamics and control, and nuclear reactor safety are considered. Fusion Science and Technology This specialty deals with current approaches to the design of a fusion reactor. For both the magnetic and the inertial confinement schemes, problems of particle confinement, plasma 46 Undergraduate Program in Nuclear Engineering Freshman Year Chemistry 1A – General Chemistry or Chemistry 4A – General Chemistry and Quantitative Analysis E 7 – Introduction to Applied Computing E 10 – Engineering Design and Analysis Mathematics 1A – Calculus Mathematics 1B – Calculus Physics 7A – Physics for Scientists and Engineers Reading and Composition Course from List A1 Reading and Composition Course from List B Total Sophomore Year E 45 – Properties of Materials EE 40 – Introduction to Microelectronic Circuits or EE 100 – Electronic Techniques for Engineering Mathematics 53 – Multivariable Calculus Mathematics 54 – Linear Algebra and Differential Equations Physics 7B – Physics for Scientists and Engineers Physics 7C – Physics for Scientists and Engineers First and Second Additional Humanities/Social Studies Courses1 Total Junior Year E 115 – Engineering Thermodynamics E 117 – Methods of Materials Analysis NE 101 – Nuclear Reactions and Radiation NE 104 – Radiation Detection Lab NE 150 – Nuclear Reactor Theory Technical Electives3 Third Additional Humanities/Social Studies Course Total Senior Year NE 170 – Nuclear Design Technical Electives Total 3 1,2 1 118-122 Units* Fall 4 3 4 4 <2> 15-17 3 4 4 3-4 15 4 3 4 3-4 14-15 14 14 Spring 4 4 4 4 15 4 4 4 3-4 15 3 3 9 15 3 9 3-4 15-16 Upper Division Technical Electives The following groups of electives should help undergraduate students focus their choices on specific professional goals. The electives selected need not be from any single group. Beam and Accelerator Applications: Physics 110A/B (or EE 117), 129 A/B, 139, 142; NE 155, 180 Bionuclear Engineering: BioE C165; EE 120 (EE 20N is a prerequisite for this course), 145B; NE 107, 162 Fission Power Engineering: ME 106, 109 (Chem E 150A may be substituted for ME 106 and 109); NE 120, 124, 155, 161, 167, 175 Fusion Power Engineering: Physics 110A/B, 142; NE 120, 180, 155 Homeland Security and Nonproliferation: Chemistry 143, Physics 110A/B, 111, NE 107, 130, 155, 175 Materials in Nuclear Technology: MSE 102, 104, 112, 113; NE 120, 124, 155, 161 Nuclear Fuel Cycles and Waste Management: Chem E 150A/B; E 120; Energy Resources Group 151; MSE 112; NE 120, 124, 155, 161, 175 Radiation and Health Physics: NE 120, 155, 162, 180 Risk, Safety and Systems Analysis: CE 193; Chem E 150A; E 120; IEOR 166; NE 120, 124, 155, 161, 167, 175 <Optional> NE 39, Issues in Nuclear Engineering (recommended) Fourth Additional Humanities/Social Studies Course1 1 The Humanities/Social Studies (H/SS) requirement includes two approved reading and composition courses and four additional approved courses, with which a number of specific conditions must be satisfied. This chart shows the courses in recommended order, but in most cases H/SS courses can be taken at any time during the program as long as prerequisites are met. See coe.berkeley.edu/hssreq for complete details and a list of approved courses. 2 Students must take one course with ethics content. This may be fulfilled within the Humanities/ Social Studies Electives requirement by taking one of the following courses: Anthropology 156B; BioE 100; E 124, 130AC, 195; Environmental Science, Policy and Management 161, 162; Geography 31; Interdisciplinary Studies 61, 100E; International and Area Studies 105; Legal Studies 19AC, 100A; Philosophy 2, 104, 107; Political Science 108A; Public Health 115; Sociology 116, 123. 3 32 technical elective units must include at least 17 units of upper division NE courses. Remaining technical elective units must be fulfilled by taking upper division courses in engineering and science. The technical elective units cannot include: any course taken on a P/NP basis; BioE 100; CS 194, 195, C195; E 100, 110, C111, 124, 130AC, 140, 191, 193, 195, 196; EE 194; IEOR 172, 190 series. 4 Students must consult with and obtain approval from their faculty adviser no later than the fall semester of their junior year for their choices of technical elective courses. *A minimum of 120 units is required for graduation. Completed in 2007, the 285,000 square foot Stanley Hall houses the Department of Bioengineering and the California Institute for Quantitative Biosciences (QB3) and was designed to promote multidisciplinary interaction and innovation. The atrium (pictured) forms the heart of the building. t 48 Joint Major Programs The joint major programs are designed for students who wish to undertake study in two major areas of engineering in order to qualify for employment in either field or for positions in which competence in two fields is required. These curricula include the core courses in each of the major fields. While they may require increased course loads, they can be completed in four years, and both majors are shown on the student’s transcript. The joint major programs currently offered are listed below. Each program is described in detail on the proceeding pages. • Bioengineering and Materials Science and Engineering • Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences and Materials Science and Engineering • Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences and Nuclear Engineering • Materials Science and Engineering and Mechanical Engineering • Materials Science and Engineering and Nuclear Engineering • Mechanical Engineering and Nuclear Engineering Junior Transfer Applicants. Junior transfer applicants may apply directly to one of the joint major programs. Transfer students may not change their major after admission, so those interested in a joint major program should select carefully before submitting their application. For more details on transfer admission and requirements, see the College of Engineering Prospective Students page at coe.berkeley.edu/ prospective-students. Applicants interested in a joint major with chemical engineering must apply to the College of Chemistry. Chemical Engineering Joint Major Programs: There are also two joint major programs in cojunction with chemical engineering offered through the College of Chemistry: • Chemical Engineering and Materials Science and Engineering • Chemical Engineering and Nuclear Engineering Transfer students interested in a chemical engineering joint major must apply to the College of Chemistry. Current UC Berkeley students interested in one of the chemical engineering joint majors should contact the College of Chemistry for information on how to change into their college. Full details on the chemical engineering joint major program and curricula can be found in the Announcement of the College of Chemistry. Admission to a Joint Major Program Freshman Admits. Students admitted to the College of Engineering as freshmen may petition or apply to a joint major program in their third or fourth semesters if they have at least a 3.0 grade point average. Some joint majors accept petitions at any time during these semesters, while others require an application process administered only once per year near the beginning of the spring semester. Engineering students considering a joint major are advised to meet with their student affairs adviser in the College of Engineering Student Affairs Office before their third semester to learn more about the process. See coe.berkeley.edu/joint-majors for further information. Bioengineering and Materials Science and Engineering Joint Major Program The Department of Bioengineering offers a joint major with Materials Science and Engineering for students who have an interest in the field of biomaterials. The broad-based curriculum includes exposure to fundamental courses in engineering and life sciences and will allow students to understand the interface between the two major fields. Students who graduate with this joint major will successfully compete for jobs in the field of biomaterials in academia, industry, and government. Joint Major Program in Bioengineering and Materials Science and Engineering Freshman Year Chemistry 1A – General Chemistry or Chemistry 4A – General Chemistry and Quantitative Analysis Chemistry 3A and 3AL – Chemical Structure and Reactivity or Chemistry 112A – Organic Chemistry1 E 7 – Introduction to Applied Computing or CS 61A – Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs E 10 – Engineering Design and Analysis or BioE 10 – Introduction to Biomedicine for Engineers Mathematics 1A – Calculus Mathematics 1B – Calculus Physics 7A – Physics for Scientists and Engineers Reading and Composition Course from List A2 Freshman Seminar3 <Optional> Total Sophomore Year Biology 1A and 1AL – General Biology Chemistry 3B – Chemical Structure and Reactivity or Chemistry 112B – Organic Chemistry1 E 45, Properties of Materials EE 40 – Introduction to Microelectronic Circuits, EE 100 – Electronic Techniques for Engineering, or BioE 101 – Instrumentation in Biology and Medicine 132-134 Units Spring 5 4 4 4 <1> 17-18 5 4 4 4 17 4 4 4 3-4 18 4 3-4 49 Fall 4 3-4 4 4 1 16-17 3 3 - Chemistry 112A/B is intended for students majoring in chemistry or a closely related field and is more intensive than Chemistry 3A/3B. Note: Prerequisites to Chemistry 112A/B include Chemistry 1A and 1B (or 4A and 4B). Pre-Med students should take Chemistry 3B and 3BL or 112B, and Biology 1B. 1 2 The Humanities/Social Studies (H/SS) requirement includes two approved reading and composition courses and four additional approved courses, with which a number of specific conditions must be satisfied. This chart shows the courses in recommended order, but in most cases H/SS courses can be taken at any time during the program as long as prerequisites are met. See coe.berkeley.edu/hssreq for complete details and a list of approved courses. At least one semester of BioE 24 is required. Students may also select BioE 24 or 25, MSE 24, or E92 for the optional second semester. 3 4 Fulfills both Humanities/Social Studies and Ethics Content: Anthropology 156B; BioE 100; Engineering 124, 130AC, 195; Environmental Science, Policy, and Management 161, 162; Letters and Science 160B; Philosphy 2, C104, 107; Public Health 115. Fulfills Bioengineering Ethics Content requirement only: E 191, Public Health 116 See course list on page 16. Mathematics 53 – Multivariable Calculus 4 Mathematics 54 – Linear Algebra and Differential Equations Physics 7B – Physics for Scientists and Engineers 4 Reading and Composition Course from List B2 Total 14 Junior Year 4 BioE 102 – Biomechanics BioE 104 – Biological Transport Phenomena Chemistry 135 – Chemical Biology; MCB 102 – Survey of 3 the Principles of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, or MCB 110 – General Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Chemistry 120B – Physical Chemistry, Chemistry C130/MCB C100A 3 – Biophysical Chemistry, E 115 – Engineering Thermodynamics, or BioE C105B/ME C105B – Thermodynamics and Biothermodynamics Molecular and Cell Biology 130 – Cell Biology MSE 102 – Bonding,Crystallography and Crystal Defects 3 MSE 104 – Characterization of Materials BioE 100 or First Additional Humanities/Social Studies Course with Ethics Content2,4 Second Additional Humanities/Social Studies Course2 3-4 Total 16 Senior Year BioE 110 – Biomedical Physiology for Engineers 3-4 BioE 115 – Cell Biology Laboratory for Engineers, or MSE 130 – Experimental Materials Science BioE 116 – Cell and Tissue Engineering BioE C117 – Structural Aspects of Biomaterials BioE C118 – Biological Performance of Materials 4 BioE 121 – Introduction to Micro and Nanobiotechnology: BioMEMS, 3-4 BioE 150 – Introduction to Bionanoscience and Bionanotechnology, MSE 111 – Properties of Electronic Materials, MSE 112 – Corrosion, and/or MSE 113 – Mechanical Behavior of Engineering Materials (Choose 2 of 5) 3 Chem E 178 – Polymer Science and Technology or MSE 151 – Polymeric Materials 4 3-4 3 17 5 6 Bioengineering Design Project or Research5 Third and Fourth Additional Humanities and Social Studies Courses2 3-4 Technical Elective6 Total 16-17 Choose from the following approved list (consult the General Catalog for prerequisites): BioE 113, 116, C117, 121, H194; MSE 103, 111, 112, 113. 50 Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences and Materials Science and Engineering Joint Major Program The materials used in integrated circuits run the gamut to include semiconductors, insulators, metals, polymers, and composites, motivating students to seek the joint major in electrical engineering and computer sciences and material science and engineering. The curriculum in this joint major is designed to provide a fundamental background in both disciplines, so that students will be conversant in all aspects of materials selection and design to optimize electronic, optical and magnetic properties in engineering applications. Students completing this joint major program will find career options in all branches of the microelectronics industries. Joint Major Program in Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences and Materials Science and Engineering Freshman Year Chemistry 1A – General Chemistry or Chemistry 4A – General Chemistry and Quantative Analysis E 7 – Introduction to Applied Computing E 10 – Engineering Design and Analysis Mathematics 1A – Calculus Mathematics 1B – Calculus Physics 7A – Physics for Scientists and Engineers Reading and Composition Course from List A 1 129-136 Units Fall 4 3 4 4 <1> 15-16 4 3 4 4 3-4 18-19 4 4 Spring 4 4 4 4 <1> 16-17 4 4 4 4 16 4 3-4 Reading and Composition Course from List B1 <Optional> Freshman Seminar or E 92 (Survey Course) Total Sophomore Year CS 61A – Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs CS 61B – Data Structures E 45 – Properties of Materials EE 40, Introduction to Microelectronic Circuits Mathematics 53 – Multivariable Calculus Mathematics 54 – Linear Algebra and Differential Equations Physics 7B – Physics for Scientists and Engineers Physics 7C – Physics for Scientists and Engineers First Additional Humanities/Social Studies Course1 Total Junior Year CS 61C – Machine Structures or EE 20N – Structure and Interpretation of Systems and Signals E 115 – Engineering Thermodynamics or Physics 112 – Statistical and Thermal Physics EE 105 – Microelectronic Devices and Circuits EE 126 – Probability and Random Processes, Statistics 25 – Introduction to Probability and Statistics for Engineers, or Statistics 134 – Concepts of Probability MSE 102 – Bonding, Crystallography, and Crystal Defects MSE 103 – Phase Transformations and Kinetics MSE 104 – Characterization of Materials Physics 137A – Quantum Mechanics Second Additional Humanities/Social Studies Courses Total Senior Year E 190 – Technical Communication EE 117 – Electromagnetic Fields and Waves 1 The Humanities/Social Studies (H/SS) requirement includes two approved reading and composition courses and four additional approved courses, with which a number of specific conditions must be satisfied. This chart shows the courses in recommended order, but in most cases H/SS courses can be taken at any time during the program as long as prerequisites are met. See coe.berkeley.edu/hssreq for complete details and a list of approved courses. 2 1 3 4 15 4 3 3 3 3-4 16-17 3 4 3-4 17-19 3 4 6 3-4 16-17 EE 140 – Linear Integrated Circuits or EE 141 – Digital Integrated Circuits MSE 111 – Properties of Electronic Materials or EE 130 – Integrated Circuit Devices MSE 130 – Experimental Materials Science Physics 141A – Solid State Physics Technical Electives Total 2 Technical electives must include two courses: (1) one course from the following: CS 150; EE 119, 143; and (2) at least three 3 units from the MSE 120 series courses. Third and Fourth Additional Humanities/Social Studies Courses1 Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences and Nuclear Engineering Joint Major Program Joint Major Program in Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences and Nuclear Engineering Freshman Year Chemistry 1A – General Chemistry or Chemistry 4A – General Chemistry and Quantative Analysis CS 61A – Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs CS 61B – Data Structures E 10 – Engineering Design and Analysis Mathematics 1A – Calculus Mathematics 1B – Calculus Physics 7A – Physics for Scientists and Engineers Reading and Composition Course from List A Total Sophomore Year E 45 – Properties of Materials EE 20N – Structure and Interpretation of Systems and Signals EE 40 – Introduction to Microelectronic Circuits Mathematics 53 – Multivariable Calculus Mathematics 54 – Linear Algebra and Differential Equations Physics 7B – Physics for Scientists and Engineers Physics 7C – Physics for Scientists and Engineers Reading and Composition Course from List B1 Total Junior Year E 115 – Engineering Thermodynamics E 190 – Technical Communication EE 120 – Signals and Systems EE 126 – Probability and Random Processes, Statistics 25 – Introduction to Probability and Statistics for Engineers, or Statistics 134 – Concepts of Probability NE 101 – Nuclear Reactions and Radiation NE 104 – Radiation Detection Lab NE 150 – Nuclear Reactor Theory First and Second Additional Humanities/Social Studies Courses1 Third Additional Humanities/Social Studies Course1 Total Senior Year EE 105 – Macroelectronic Devices and Circuits EE 117 – Electromagnetic Fields and Waves NE 170A – Nuclear Engineering Design Technical Electives Total 2 1 126-130 Units Fall 4 4 3 4 15 3 4 4 4 15 4 4 Spring 4 4 4 4 16 4 4 4 4 16 3 3-4 Joint Major Programs in Engineering 1 The Humaniti∆es/Social Studies (H/SS) requirement includes two approved reading and composition courses and four additional approved courses, with which a number of specific conditions must be satisfied. This chart shows the courses in recommended order, but in most cases H/SS courses can be taken at any time during the program as long as prerequisites are met. See coe.berkeley.edu/hssreq for complete details and a list of approved courses. Students must take one course with ethics content. This may be fulfilled within the Humanities/ Social Studies Requirement by taking one of the following courses: Anthropology 156B; BioE 100; E 124, 130AC, 195; Environmental Science, Policy, and Management 161, 162; Geography 31; Interdisciplinary Studies 61, 100E; International and Area Studies 105; Legal Studies 19AC, 100A; Philosophy 2, 104, 107; Political Science 108A; Public Health 115; Sociology 116, 123. Technical Electives include: • At least 9 units of upper-division nuclear engineering courses from the following groups. The groups are presented to aid undergraduate students in focusing their choices on specific professional goals, however, the electives selected need not be from any single group. Courses listed from other departments in these groups may be taken to provide further depth but may not be used toward the 9 units. Beam and Accelerator Applications: Physics 110A/B (or EE 117), 129 A/B, 139, 142; NE 155, 180 Bionuclear Engineering: BioE C165; EE 120 (EE 20N is a prerequisite for this course), 145B; NE 107, 162 Fission Power Engineering: ME 106, 109 (Chem E 150A may be sub¬stituted for ME 106 and 109); NE 120, 124, 155, 161, 167, 175 Fusion Power Engineering: Physics 110A/B, 142; NE 120, 180, 155 Homeland Security and Nonproliferation: Chemistry 143, Physics 110A/B, 111, NE 107, 130, 155, 175 Materials in Nuclear Technology: MSE 102, 104, 112, 113; NE 120, 124, 155, 161 Nuclear Fuel Cycles and Waste Management: Chem E 150A/B; E 120; Energy Resources Group 151; MSE 112; NE 120, 124, 155, 161, 175 Radiation and Health Physics: NE 120, 155, 162, 180 Risk, Safety and Systems Analysis: C E 193; Chem E 150A; E 120; IEOR 166; NE 120, 124, 155, 161, 167, 175 2 4 6-8 18-20 4 8 3-4 15-16 3 3 3-4 15-16 4 3 9 16 • At least 8 units of upper division EECS courses from the following lists: Electromagnetics and Plasmas: EE 118, 119, 239 Electronics: EE 130, 131, 140, 141, 143; CS 150 Power Systems and Control: EE 113, 114, 120, 128 Fourth Additional Humanities/Social Studies Course1 52 Materials Science and Engineering and Mechanical Engineering Joint Major Program Students interested in the mechanical behavior of materials have the option of pursuing a joint major in materials science and engineering and mechanical engineering. The curriculum addresses key fundamentals of both disciplines, preparing students in materials selection and design for structural and functional applications. Students completing this joint major enter professional positions in the aerospace, automotive, energy, and manufacturing industries, along with many others. Joint Major Program in Materials Science and Engineering and Mechanical Engineering Freshman Year Chemistry 1A – General Chemistry or Chemistry 4A – General Chemistry and Quantative Analysis E 7 – Introduction to Applied Computing E 10 – Engineering Design and Analysis Mathematics 1A – Calculus Mathematics 1B – Calculus Physics 7A – Physics for Scientists and Engineers Reading and Composition Course from List A1 Reading and Composition Course from List B Total Sophomore Year E 28 – Graphics Communication in Engineering E 45 – Properties of Materials Mathematics 53 – Multivariable Calculus Mathematics 54 – Linear Algebra and Differential Equations ME 40 – Thermodynamics ME C85 – Introduction to Solid Mechanics Physics 7B – Physics for Scientists and Engineers First and Second Additional Humanities/Social Studies Courses1 Total Junior Year EE 100 – Electronic Techniques for Engineering ME 104 – Engineering Mechanics II (Dynamics) ME 106 – Fluid Mechanics ME 132 – Dynamical Systems and Feedback ME 108 – Introduction to Engineering Materials or MSE 113 – Mechanical Behavior of Engineering Materials MSE 102 – Bonding, Crystallography, and Crystal Defects MSE 103 – Phase Transformation and Kinetics MSE 104 – Characterization of Materials Technical Electives2 Third Additional Humanities/Social Studies Course1 3 3 3 3 3-4 15-16 1 3 3 3 3 3 16 3 4 4 3-4 14-15 1 124-130 Units Fall 4 3 4 4 <1> 15-16 Spring 4 4 4 4 <1> 16-17 3 4 3 3 3-4 16-17 4 3 3 4 3 17 3 3 6 3-4 15-16 <Optional> Freshman Seminar or E 92 (Survey Course) The Humanities/Social Studies (H/SS) requirement includes two approved reading and composition courses and four additional approved courses, with which a number of specific conditions must be satisfied. This chart shows the courses in recommended order, but in most cases H/SS courses can be taken at any time during the program as long as prerequisites are met. See coe.berkeley.edu/hssreq for complete details and a list of approved courses. 1 2 Total Senior Year E 190M – Technical Communication for Mechanical Engineers ME 102A – Experimentation and Measurement ME 102B – Mechanical Engineering Design ME 107 – Mechanical Engineering Laboratory ME 109 – Heat Transfer MSE 112 – Corrosion MSE 130 – Experimental Materials Science Technical Electives Total 2 A total of 12 upper division technical elective units are required. These must include 6 units of upperdivision Mechanical Engineering courses, one of which must be from the following list: ME 101, 110, 119, 128, 130, 135, 142, 145, 161, or 165. In addition, 3 units must be from the MSE 120 series. Technical electives cannot include: any course taken on a P/NP basis; BioE 100; CS 194, 195, C195; E 100, 110, C111, 124, 130AC, 140, 191, 193, 195, 196; EE 194; IEOR 190 series. Fourth Additional Humanities/Social Studies Course1 Materials Science and Engineering and Nuclear Engineering Joint Major Program The interface between materials science and engineering and nuclear engineering is an especially challenging and rewarding one, giving students in this joint major an exciting range of options. With a sound curriculum steeped in the fundamentals, the joint major program prepares students to fully understand the behavior of materials in a reactor environment, including their design and optimization. Students completing this joint major will successfully compete for positions in the energy sector. Joint Major Program in Materials Science and Engineering and Nuclear Engineering Freshman Year Chemistry 1A – General Chemistry or Chemistry 4A – General Chemistry and Quantative Analysis E 7 – Introduction to Applied Computing E 10 – Engineering Design and Analysis Mathematics 1A – Calculus Mathematics 1B – Calculus Physics 7A – Physics for Scientists and Engineers Reading and Composition Course from List A1 Reading and Composition Course from List B Total Sophomore Year E 45 – Properties of Materials EE 40 – Introduction to Microelectronic Circuits or EE 100 – Electronic Techniques for Engineering Mathematics 53 – Multivariable Calculus Mathematics 54 – Linear Algebra and Differential Equations ME C85 – Introduction to Solid Mechanics Physics 7B – Physics for Scientists and Engineers Physics 7C – Physics for Scientists and Engineers First and Second Additional Humanities/Social Studies Courses1 Total Junior Year E 115 – Engineering Thermodynamics MSE 102 – Bonding Crystallography and Crystal Defects MSE 103 – Phase Transformation and Kinetics MSE 104 – Characterization of Materials NE 101 – Nuclear Reactions and Radiation 4 3 4 3 3-4 17-18 3 4 9 16 4 3 4 6-8 17-19 1 125-131 Units Fall 4 3 4 4 <1> 15-16 Spring 4 4 4 4 <1> 16-17 3 4 4 4 15 3 4 3 3 3-4 16-17 4 3 3 3 13 53 <Optional> Freshman Seminar or E 92 (Survey Course)2 The Humanities/Social Studies (H/SS) requirement includes two approved reading and composition courses and four additional approved courses, with which a number of specific conditions must be satisfied. This chart shows the courses in recommended order, but in most cases H/SS courses can be taken at any time during the program as long as prerequisites are met. See coe.berkeley.edu/hssreq for complete details and a list of approved courses. Students must take one course with ethics content. This may be fulfilled within the Humanities/ Social Studies (H/SS) requirement by taking one of the following courses: Anthropology 156B; BioE 100; E 124, 130AC, 195; Environmental Science, Policy, and Management 161, 162; Geography 31; Interdisciplinary Studies 61, 100E; International and Area Studies 105; Legal Studies 19AC, 100A; Philosophy 2, 104, 107; Political Science 108A; Public Health 115; Sociology 116, 123. 2 NE 39 also recommended. 3 Technical electives must include at least 9 units of upper division NE courses and at least 3 units from the MSE 120 series courses. 1 NE 104 – Radiation Detection Lab NE 150 – Introduction to Nuclear Reactor Theory Technical Electives Total Senior Year MSE 111 – Properties of Electronic Materials MSE 112 – Corrosion MSE 113 – Mechanical Behavior of Materials MSE 130 – Experimental Materials Science NE 120 – Nuclear Materials NE 170A – Nuclear Engineering Design Technical Electives3 Total 3 Third and Fourth Additional Humanities/Social Studies Courses1 54 Mechanical Engineering and Nuclear Engineering Joint Major Program This program was established to address the interface between the two major fields. It is intended for nuclear engineering students interested in mechanical design and heat transfer, as well as for mechanical engineering students who wish to further their knowledge of nuclear radiological systems and processes. Its objective is to provide students with a strong and competitive background in both majors, leading to professional careers in nuclear and radiation-based industries, or to pursue graduate study in nuclear engineering and other engineering disciplines or related fields such as medicine and physics. Joint Major Program in Mechanical Engineering and Nuclear Engineering Freshman Year Chemistry 1A – General Chemistry or Chemistry 4A – General Chemistry and Quantative Analysis E 7 – Introduction to Applied Computing E 10 – Engineering Design and Analysis Mathematics 1A – Calculus Mathematics 1B – Calculus Physics 7A – Physics for Scientists and Engineers Reading and Composition Course from List A Total Sophomore Year E 28, Graphics Communication and Engineering Mathematics 53 – Multivariable Calculus Mathematics 54 – Linear Algebra and Differential Equations ME 40, Thermodynamics ME C85, Introduction to Solid Mechanics Physics 7B – Physics for Scientists and Engineers Physics 7C – Physics for Scientists and Engineers First and Second Additional Humanities/Social Studies Courses1 Total Junior Year EE 40 – Introduction to Microelectronic Circuits or EE 100 – Electronic Techniques for Engineering ME 104 – Engineering Mechanics II (Dynamics) ME 106 – Fluid Mechanics ME 132 – Dynamic Systems and Feedback NE 101 – Nuclear Reactions and Radiation NE 150 – Nuclear Reactor Theory ME 108 – Introduction to Bioengineering Materials 3 4 4 1 1 124-128 Units Spring 4 4 4 4 16 4 3 3 4 3-4 17-18 4 3 3 3 3 16 3 3 3 3 3 15 54 Fall 4 3 4 4 15 3 4 4 3-4 14-15 Reading and Composition Course from List B1 1 The Humanities/Social Studies (H/SS) requirement includes two approved reading and composition courses and four additional approved courses, with which a number of specific conditions must be satisfied. This chart shows the courses in recommended order, but in most cases these courses can be taken at any time during the program as long as prerequisites are met. See coe.berkeley.edu/hssreq for complete details and a list of approved courses. Students must take one course with ethics content. This may be fulfilled within the Humanities/Social Studies Electives requirement by taking one of the following courses: Anthropology 156B; BioE 100; E 124, 130AC, 195; Environmental Science, Policy and Management 161, 162; Geography 31; Interdisciplinary Studies 61, 100E; International and Area Studies 105; Legal Studies 19AC, 100A; Philosophy 2, 104, 107; Political Science 108A; Public Health 115; Sociology 116, 123. Third Additional Humanities/Social Studies Course Technical Electives2 Total Senior Year E 190M – Technical Communication and ME 102A – Experimentation and Measurement ME 102B – Mechanical Engineering Design ME 107 – Mechanical Engineering Laboratory ME 109 – Heat Transfer NE 104 – Radiation Detection Lab NE 170A – Nuclear Engineering Design 3-4 3 17-18 4 3 3-4 4 14-15 Technical elective units include at least 6 units of upper-division elective Mechanical Engineering courses and 6 units of upper division Nuclear Engineering courses. 2 Fourth Additional Humanities/Social Studies Course1 Technical Electives Total 2 555 5 55 56 Additional Programs and Affiliated Groups Applied Science and Technology Graduate Group 230 Bechtel Engineering Center coe.berkeley.edu/AST This graduate group is administered by the College of Engineering. The program has three major areas of emphasis: applied physics, engineering science, and mathematical sciences. This program awards the Doctor of Philosophy degree. In addition, students who have been admitted to the program may also apply for the newly created Designated Emphasis in Nanoscale Science and Engineering (DE NSE), and the newlycreated emphasis (DE) in Energy, Science, and Technology (DE EST). Students usually apply for the DE during their first or second year of study. For further information, see the “NSE” section of this announcement and the DE web site: nano.berkeley.edu/de. For information about the DE EST, see mse.berkeley. edu/deest.html. Faculty associated with the program are drawn from several departments within the College of Engineering, as well as from the Departments of Physics, Chemistry, Chemical Engineering, and Mathematics. Topics of interest include the novel properties and applications of nanostructures, thin films and interface science, microelectromechanical systems (MEMS), nanoscale science and engineering, shortwavelength coherent radiation, X-ray microimaging for the life and physical sciences, plasma physics and plasma-assisted materials processing, laser-induced chemical processes, laser probing of complex reacting systems, ultrafast phenomena, particle accelerators, nonlinear dynamics, chaotic systems, numerical methods, and topics in computational fluid mechanics and reacting flows. Graduate research in the AS&T program benefits from state-of-the-art experimental facilities on the Berkeley campus and at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Among these facilities are the National Center for Electron Microscopy, with the world’s highest-resolution high-voltage microscope; a microfabrication lab for student work involving lithography, MEMS, ion implantation, and thin-film deposition; an integrated sensors laboratory; femtosecond laser laboratories; optical, electrical, and magnetic resonance spectroscopies; short wavelength laser and X-ray research laboratories; an unparalleled variety of material, chemical, and surface science analytic equipment; and a soft X-ray synchrotron dedicated to materials, chemical, and biological research based on highbrightness and partially coherent radiation. The interdisciplinary, collaborative nature of the AS&T Program provides ample opportunity to develop new research directions by making the best possible use of these facilities and the other research instrumentation available to AS&T faculty. Students in the AS&T program take courses drawn largely from regular departments with the concurrence of faculty advisers. In addition, faculty associated with the graduate group offer additional courses. Admission. The complete application, including transcripts, GRE scores, TOEFL score (if previous instruction was not in English), three letters of reference, and a statement of academic and professional goals, is due the first Monday in January for the following fall semester. To obtain application information, students should contact the Applied Science and Technology Graduate Group, 230 Bechtel Engineering Center #1708, University of California, Berkeley; Berkeley, CA 94720-1708; telephone: (510) 642-8790; email: ast.program@coe.berkeley. edu; web site: coe.berkeley.edu/AST. Lecture Series. A certificate is awarded upon completion of the course sequence. The Technical Communication Program serves the broad interests of the campus engineering community and includes two courses: Engineering 190 and Engineering 140, designed to teach students to present technical and nontechnical material effectively to a variety of audiences. Engineering Science Program is an undergraduate multi-departmental and interdisciplinary program that provides a means for students to acquire knowledge of engineering methods while pursuing interests in areas of natural science. The options offered within the curriculum prepare students for advanced study in engineering, science, bioengineering, or mathematics. The majors offered through the program are Computational Engineering Science, Engineering Mathematics and Statistics, Environmental Engineering Science, and Engineering Physics. Graduate Programs MOT is at the core of the graduate TLS offerings. The UC Berkeley Management of Technology Program is an interdisciplinary research and teaching program co-sponsored by the College of Engineering and the Haas School of Business. MOT’s focus is the process of bringing high technology products to the marketplace. The largest component of MOT is the certificate program. MOT includes courses from several schools and departments: Haas School of Business, Mechanical Engineering, Civil Engineering, Industrial Engineering & Operations Research, Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Material Science, Chemical Engineering, Energy Resources, and the School of Information. Other MOT programs include the Mayfield Internship, which sponsors students each summer to intern in well-funded Bay Area start-up businesses, and the MOT China Fellowship, which sponsors students each winter to visit businesses, government agencies, and universities in China. The Graduate Group in Applied Science and Technology (AS&T) focuses on studies involving the application of physical and mathematical techniques to fundamental investigations and emerging areas within the physical and life sciences. Major areas of emphasis are in applied physics, engineering sciences, and mathematical sciences. AS&T offers students the option of crossing disciplinary lines in developing graduate degree programs. AS&T is a Ph.D. program; however, students may also pursue a Master’s of Science degree by completing the additional requirements while pursuing the Ph.D. Technology and Leadership Studies 230 Bechtel Engineering Center tls.berkeley.edu Technology and Leadership Studies (TLS) seeks to develop leaders who will create and drive the solutions to today’s most pressing problems. TLS is the administrative home to the Center of Entrepreneurship and Technology (CET); the Management of Technology Program (MOT), a joint program with the Haas School of Business; the Technical Communications Program; the Applied Science and Technology Graduate Group; and Engineering Science. Broadly, TLS offers undergraduate, graduate, and executive education courses in technology management, innovation, entrepreneurship, communication, and ethics. Undergraduate Programs TLS undergraduate programs comprise the coursework offered by the Center for Entrepreneurship and Technology (CET), Technical Communications, and Engineering Science. CET courses are designed to teach key concepts of entrepreneurship including opportunity recognition, business model development, operational planning, leadership, marketing strategies, and financing alternatives. At the center of CET teaching is strong industry participation. CET draws on a broad network to bring guest lecturers and executives in residence to TLS. CET’s core sequence courses are IEOR 190A, Engineering Entrepreneurship, and E198, the A. Richard Newton Global Technology Leaders Executive Education Executive education is one of the most recent initiatives of TLS and is still in its developmental stages. Other Programs TLS relies heavily upon a learning-by-doing style of instruction that translates into several programs that encourage the Berkeley and global communities to get hands-on experience in technology and leadership. These programs include the Venture Lab, the Executive in Residence Program, the MOT-CRC China Program, and several competitions, including the Technology Breakthrough Competition, the CleanTech Competition and the Venture Lab Prize Competition. TLS is also working on programs to recognize individual achievements in leadership and expand the scope of its mentorship activities. On a global scale, TLS along with the Dado and Maria Banatao GLOBE Center is building a series of global partnerships, initially with China, Finland, and India. Additional Programs and Affiliated Groups Nanoscale Science and Engineering nano.berkeley.edu Doctoral students interested in pursuing interdisciplinary research focused on nanoscale science and engineering (NSE) may additionally join the growing Designated Emphasis (DE) in Nanoscale Science and Engineering (NSE), administered by the NSE Graduate Group. The DE, like a minor, is listed on the academic transcript (e.g., Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering with Designated Emphasis in Nanoscale Science and Engineering). Requirements include one core course, two electives, participation in a group seminar, and a nanorelated thesis. Students usually apply for the DE during their first or second year of study. For a list of participating programs, please visit nano.berkeley.edu/de/programs.html. For more information about the NSE DE, contact Prof. Eicke Weber, weber@berkeley.edu, Chair of the NSE Graduate Group, Berkeley Nanosciences and Nanoengineering Institute, 210 McLaughlin Hall #1726, University of California, Berkeley; Berkeley, CA 947201726; email: nanoinstitute@lists.berkeley.edu. cheme.berkeley.edu Studies in Chemical Engineering are offered only by the Department of Chemical Engineering in the College of Chemistry. For information regarding the programs of study available, consult the Announcement of the College of Chemistry. Inquiries may be directed to the College of Chemistry Undergraduate Office (420 Latimer Hall #1460) for undergraduate students, and to the Chemical Engineering Graduate Office (201 Gilman Hall #1462) for graduate students. t Chemical Engineering In Soda Hall (above), “the building is the computer,” with advanced networking, wireless, and access to computer clusters for shared computing power. The building was designed to foster a team approach to computing innovation and houses classrooms and labs dedicated to computer science. 58 58 General Information General Administrative Officers President of the University Mark G. Yudof Chancellor, Berkeley Robert J. Birgeneau, Ph.D. Executive Vice Chancellor and Provost George W. Breslauer, Ph.D. Vice Chancellor for Research Robert Price, Ph.D. (Interim) Contact Information College of Engineering coe.berkeley.edu Office of the Dean: 320 McLaughlin Hall #1700 (510) 642-5771 Student Affairs Office (Undergraduate): 308 McLaughlin Hall #1702 (510) 642-7594 Student Affairs Office (Graduate): See department or program of interest Other Offices Admissions (graduate): Graduate Division, 309 Sproul Hall #5900 grad.berkeley.edu Admissions (undergraduate): Office of Undergraduate Admissions, 110 Sproul Hall #5800 admissions.berkeley.edu Berkeley Engineering Alumni Relations 1925 Walnut St. #1704 bears@berkeley.edu coe.berkeley.edu/alumni Berkeley Engineering Fund 208 McLaughlin Hall #1722 bef@coe.berkeley.edu coe.berkeley.edu/support-the-college (510) 642-2487 Berkeley Nanosciences and Nanoengineering Institute 210 McLaughlin Hall #1726 nano.berkeley.edu Career Center 2111 Bancroft Way #4350 career.berkeley.edu Charles Tunstall Multicultural Engineering Program 222 Bechtel Engineering Center coe.berkeley.edu/cues/mep Chemical Engineering, Department of 201 Gilman Hall #1462 cheme.berkeley.edu Chemistry, College of 420 Latimer Hall #1460 chemistry.berkeley.edu Continuing Education University Extension 1995 University Avenue #7010 course@unex.berkeley.edu Extension Catalog: www.unex.berkeley.edu Engineering Short Courses: www.unex.berkeley.edu/engineering Harmer E. Davis Transportation Library 412 McLaughlin Hall #1720 lib.berkeley.edu/ITSL Engineers’ Joint Council 220 Bechtel Engineering Center #4500 president@ejc.berkeley.edu ejc.berkeley.edu Financial Aid 201 Sproul Hall #1960 financialaid.berkeley.edu Freshman and Sophomore Seminars 333 Campbell Hall #2922 fss.berkeley.edu Graduate Academic Diversity (GrAD) Program 222 Bechtel Engineering Center coe.berkeley.edu/cues/grad Graduate Division Third Floor, Sproul Hall #5900 grad.berkeley.edu General Information Instructional Units Applied Science and Technology Graduate Group, Meakin Interdisciplinary Studies Center, 230 Bechtel Engineering Center #1708 coe.berkeley.edu/AST Bioengineering, 306 Stanley Hall #1762 bioeng.berkeley.edu Bioengineering Graduate Group, 306 Stanley Hall #1762 bioegrad.berkeley.edu Civil and Environmental Engineering, 760 Davis Hall #1710 (Graduate Admissions, 750 Davis Hall #1714) www.ce.berkeley.edu Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences, 205 Cory Hall #1770 (Graduate Admissions, 205 Cory Hall #1770) eecs.berkeley.edu Engineering Science, Meakin Interdisciplinary Studies Center, Interdisciplinary Studies, 230 Bechtel Engineering Center #1708 coe.berkeley.edu/engsci Industrial Engineering and Operations Research, 4141 Etcheverry Hall #1777 ieor.berkeley.edu Materials Science and Engineering, 210 Hearst Memorial Mining Building #1760 mse.berkeley.edu Mechanical Engineering, 6189 Etcheverry Hall #1740 (Graduate Admissions, 6189 Etcheverry Hall #1740) me.berkeley.edu Nuclear Engineering, 4153 Etcheverry Hall #1730 (Graduate Admissions, 4149 Etcheverry Hall #1730) nuc.berkeley.edu Technology and Leadership Studies 230 Bechtel Engineering Center #1708 tls.berkeley.edu College of Engineering Administrative Officers Dean S. Shankar Sastry, Ph.D. Associate Deans Fiona M. Doyle, Ph.D., Executive Associate Dean George Leitmann, Ph.D., International Relations Dennis Lieu, Ph.D., Student Affairs Tse-Jae King Liu, Ph.D., Research Carlo Séquin, Ph.D., Capital Projects University Professor Richard M. Karp, Ph.D. The Kresge Engineering Library (left) contains nearly one million engineering print and electronic volumes, journals, and technical reports, as well as 250 stations for reading and studying. t 60 Housing and Dining Services 2610 Channing Way #2272 housing.berkeley.edu Industrial Liaison Program 208 McLaughlin Hall #1722 International Student Services International House 2299 Piedmont Avenue #2320 Julia Morgan Engineering Program 222 Bechtel Engineering Center coe.berkeley.edu/cues/jmep Kresge Engineering Library 110 Bechtel Engineering Center #1796 lib.berkeley.edu/ENGI Management of Technology Certificate Program 230 Bechtel Engineering Center #1708 mot.berkeley.edu Marketing and Communications 312 McLaughlin Hall, #1704 coe.berkeley.edu Pre-Engineering Partnerships 469 Evans #1768 coe.berkeley.edu/cues/pep Student Affairs Office 308 McLaughlin Hall #1702 coe.berkeley.edu/advising Summer Undergraduate Program in Engineering Research at Berkeley (SUPERB) 222 Bechtel Engineering Center coe.berkeley.edu/cues/superb Transportation Engineering, see Civil and Environmental Engineering, Institute of Transportation Studies Index Absence from the University, 9 Academic Support, 6 Access to Student Records, 63 Accreditation, 8, 16, 19, 30, 34, 39, 43 Admission Freshman, 8 From another UC Berkeley college, 8 Graduate, 11 Joint Majors, 8 Junior Transfer, 8 Minor Programs, 8 Readmission, 8-9 Second Degree, 8 Undergraduate, 8 Advanced Nuclear Engineering Computational Laboratory, 45 Advising, 6 Alumni, 6, 7 Alumni Networking, 6, 7 Annual Fund, 7 Applied Nuclear Physics, 44 Applied Science and Technology, 11, 56 Art, Technology, and Culture, 56 Automatic Control and Instrumentation Laboratory, 41 Bechtel Engineering Center, 6 Berkeley Engineering Alumni Fund, 7 Berkeley Engineering Alumni Relations (BEAR), 7 Berkeley Expert Systems Technology, 41 Berkeley Instructional Technology Studio, 41 Berkeley Manufacturing Institute, 41 Berkeley Summer Bioengineering Research Program, 13 Bioengineering, 8, 11, 13-16, 48 Facilities, 14 Graduate study, 11, 14 Joint Major, 8, 13, 48 Minor, 8, 13 Summer Research Program, 13 Undergraduate program,13-15 Bioengineering/Materials Science and Engineering Joint Major, 48, 49 Bioengineering/UC San Francisco Joint Graduate Group, 14 Biomaterials, 35, 37 Bionuclear and Radiological Physics, 45 Other Information Sources General Catalog, Berkeley May be purchased from the Cal Student Store, Attn: Mail Order Department, University of California, Berkeley; Berkeley, CA 94720-4504 catalog.berkeley.edu (510) 981-9618 Schedule of Classes Available online only; go to schedule.berkeley.edu EECS Undergraduate Notes A copy may be obtained from the Center for Undergraduate Matters, 205 Cory Hall eecs.berkeley.edu/Programs/Notes/ newcurric-notes.html EECS Graduate Notes eecs.berkeley.edu/Gradnotes/ grad.notes.html UC Berkeley home page: berkeley.edu Career Services, 6, 7 Center for Entrepreneurship and Technology, 55 Center for Underrepresented Engineering Students (CUES), 7 Certificate Programs, College, 11 Change of College, 8 Charles Tunstall Multicultural Engineering Program (MEP), 6, 7 Chemical Engineering, 8, 53, 56 Chemical Engineering/Materials Science and Engineering Joint Major, 8,53 Chemical Engineering/Nuclear Engineering Joint Major, 8, 53 Chemical and Electrochemical Materials Science and Engineering, 34 Civil and Environmental Engineering, 17-19 Areas of emphasis, 17 Certificate programs, 18 Civil Systems, 18 Concurrent Degrees, 18 Engineering and Project Management, 17-18 Environmental Engineering, 18 Facilities, 18 Geoengineering, 18 Graduate study, 10, 17-18 Minors, 8, 17 Structural Engineering, 19 Structural Engineering, Mechanics, and Materials (SEMM), 18 Transportation Engineering, 18, 19 Undergraduate program, 17, 19 Civil Engineering and Public Policy, 18 Civil Systems, 18 Combustion Laboratories, 41 Communications, Networks, and Systems, 20 Composite Materials Laboratory, 41 Computational Engineering Science, 8, 24-26 Computational Fluid Dynamics Laboratory, 41 Computational Marine Mechanics Laboratory (CMML), 41 Computational Materials Science and Engineering, 35 Computational Solid Mechanics Laboratory (CSML), 41 Computer Mechanics Laboratory (CML), 41 Computer Science, 8, 21 Computer Science and Engineering, 8, 20 Computer Science Bachelor of Arts (Letters & Science), 21 Computer Science Minor, 8, 21 Computer Systems, 21 Continuing Education, 6 Electrical and Computer Engineering, 8, 20 Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences, 8, 11, 20-23, 50, 51 Communications, Networks, and Systems, 20 Computer Science, 21 Computer Science and Engineering, 8, 20 Computer Systems, 21 Electrical and Computer Engineering, 8, 20 Facilities, 22 Five year B.A./M.S., B.S./M.S., 21 Graduate Program, 11, 22 Honors program, 20 Joint Majors, 8, 21, 50, 51 Minor, 8, 21 Options, 20-21, 23 Physical Electronics, 20 Undergraduate program, 20-21, 23 Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences/Materials Science and Engineering Joint Major, 8, 21, 50 Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences/Nuclear Engineering Joint Major, 8, 21, 51 Electronic, Magnetic and Optical Materials, 35 Electronic Materials, 38 Energy and Business for Sustainability Certificate, 11 Energy and the Environment, 45 Engineering and Business Administration, 11 Engineering and Project Management, 17, 19 Engineering Mathematics and Statistics, 8, 24, 27 Engineering News, 7 Engineering Physics, 8, 24, 27 Engineering Science, 8, 23-28, 55 Computational Engineering Science, 8, 24-26 Engineering Mathematics and Statistics, 8, 24, 27 Engineering Physics, 8, 24, 27 Engineering — Undeclared, 8, 30 Environmental Engineering Science, 8, 24, 28-29 Engineering – Undeclared, 8, 30 Entrepreneurship and Technology, 56 Environmental Engineering, 18, 19 Environmental Engineering Minor, 8, 17 Environmental Engineering Science, 8, 24, 28-29 Environmental Restoration Laboratory, 41 Ethics and the Impact of Technology and Society, 45 Financial Aid, Graduate, 11 Financial Aid, Undergraduate, 6 Fission Reactor Analysis, 45 Fluid Mechanics Laboratories, 41 Forefront magazine, 7 Freshman and Sophomore Seminars, 6 Fuel Cycles and Radioactive Waste, 45 Fusion Science and Technology, 45 Geoengineering, 18, 19 Graduate Academic Diversity (GrAD) Program, 7 Graduate Programs, 11 Graduate Student Instructorships, 11 Graduate Student Researchships, 11 Health Services, 6 Heat and Mass Transfer Laboratory, 41 Honors to Date (semester honors), 9 Honors at Graduation, 9-10 Honors Program, Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, 20 Housing and Dining Services, 6 Human Engineering and Robotics Laboratory, 41 Humanities and Social Studies Requirement, 10 Impact and Biomechanics Laboratory, 41 Impact and Wave Propagation Laboratory, 41 Industrial Engineering and Operations Research, 8, 10, 31-33 Facilities, 36 Graduate Study, 10, 32 Minor, 32 Undergraduate Program, 31-33 Interdisciplinary Programs, Graduate, 10 Intelligent Transportation Systems Certificate, 11 Joint Graduate Group in Bioengineering, 14 Joint Majors, 10, 49-54 Julia Morgan Engineering Program (JMEP), 6, 7 Kresge Engineering Library, 6 Laser, Particle Beam, and Plasma Technologies, 45 Laser Thermal Laboratory, 41 Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 14, 17, 21, 41, 45 Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 21, 41, 45 Libraries, Earthquake Engineering, 6 Harmer E. Davis Transportation, 6 Kresge Engineering, 6 Water Resources Center Archives, 6 Logistics Certificate, 11 Management of Technology (MOT), 11, 56 Manufacturing, 11 Manufacturing Engineering, 8, 34 Materials for Energy Technologies, 35, 39 Materials Physics and Chemistry, 38 Materials Science and Engineering, 8, 11, 35-37, 52-54 Biomaterials, 35, 38 Chemical and Electrochemical Materials Science and Engineering, 35 Computational Materials Science and Engineering, 35 Electronic, Magnetic and Optical Materials, 35 Electronic Materials, 38 Facilities, 36 Graduate Study, 11, 36 Joint Majors, 8, 36, 49-50, 52-54 Materials for Energy Technologies, 35, 39 Materials Physics and Chemistry, 38 Minor, 8, 36 Nanomaterials, 36, 39 Structural Materials, 36, 39 Undergraduate Program, 36-37 Materials Science and Engineering/ Mechanical Engineering Joint Major, 8, 52 Materials Science and Engineering/Nuclear Engineering Joint Major, 8, 53 Meakin Interdisciplinary Studies Center, 6, 56 Mechanical Behavior of Materials Laboratories, 41 Mechanical Engineering, 8, 11, 40-43, 52-53 Facilities, 41 Graduate Study, 10, 40 Joint Majors, 8, 40, 52-53 Minor, 8, 40 Options Electives, 43 Undergraduate Program, 39, 42-43 Mechanical Engineering/Nuclear Engineering Joint Major, 8, 53 MEMS Analysis and Design Laboratory, 41 Multiphase Transport Laboratory, 41 Nanobiology Laboratory, 41 Nanoengineering Laboratory, 41 Nanomaterials, 36, 39 Nano/Microsystems Laboratory, 41 Nanoscale Science and Engineering, 10, 57 National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), 45 Normal Progress, 9 61 62 Nuclear Engineering, 8, 11, 44, 53-54 Applied Nuclear Physics, 44 Bionuclear and Radiological Physics, 45 Energy and the Environment, 45 Ethics and the Impact of Technology and Society, 45 Facilities, 45 Fission Reactor Analysis, 45 Fuel Cycles and Radioactive Waste, 45 Fusion Science and Technology, 45 Graduate Programs, 11 Graduate Study, 44-45 Joint Majors, 8, 51, 53-54 Laser, Particle Beam, and Plasma Technologies, 45 Minor, 8, 44 Nuclear Materials and Chemistry, 45 Nuclear Thermal Hydraulics, 45 Risk, Safety, and Systems Analysis, 45 Undergraduate Program, 44, 48 Nuclear Materials and Chemistry, 45 Nuclear Thermal Hydraulics, 45 Nuclear Waste Research Laboratory, 45 Options, Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences, 20, 23 Passed/Not Passed Grades, 9 Physical Electronics, 20 Pre-Engineering Partnerships (PEP), 6, 7 Radio Astronomy Laboratory, 22 Reading and Composition Requirement, 9 Readmission, Undergraduate, 8 Renewable and Appropriate Energy Laboratory (RAEL), 45 Requirements, General Degree, 9 Berkeley Campus, 9 College of Engineering, 9 Humanities and Social Studies, 9 Reading and Composition, 9 University, 9 Research, Undergraduate, 6 Richmond Field Station, 18 Richmond Model-Testing Facility, 41 Risk, Safety, and Systems Analysis, 45 Robotics and Motion Control Laboratory, 41 Rock mechanics, 11 Scholarship Requirements, Undergraduate, 9 Seminars, Freshman and Sophomore, 6 Space Sciences Laboratory, 22 Stanley Hall, 15, 47 Stephen D. Bechtel Engineering Center, 6 Structural Engineering, 19 Structural Engineering and Architecture, 18 Structural Engineering, Mechanics, and Materials (SEMM), 18 Structural Engineering Minor, 8, 17 Structural Materials, 36, 38 Student Affairs Office, Undergraduate, 6 Student Center, 6 Student Involvement, 6 Student Societies, 6 Summer Undergraduate Program in Engineering Research at Berkeley (SUPERB), 6, 7 Support for the College, 6, 7 Surface and Subsurface Hydrology, 11 Surface Mechanics and Tribology Laboratory (SMTL), 41 Technology and Leadership Studies, 56 Telerobotics and Neurology Unit, 41 Transportation Engineering, 18, 19 Transportation Engineering and City and Regional Planning, 18 Transport in Porous Media Laboratories, 41 Tutoring, 6 Undeclared, see Engineering — Undeclared Undergraduate Student Affairs Office, 6, 8 University of California, Berkeley Extension, 6 University of California, San Francisco, 11, 14, 41 University of California, San Francisco Joint Graduate Group, 11, 14 UC Berkeley Electro-Mechanical Design Laboratory, 41 Vehicle Dynamics and Control Laboratory, 41 Vibration and Dynamics Laboratories, 41 Access to Student Records To implement the University Policy Governing Disclosure of Information to Students and Access to Student Records, the Engineering Student Affairs Office has established the following procedures, applicable to former students, as well as to students currently enrolled. Access to Records The following staff personnel have access to student records: staff of the Engineering Student Affairs and Dean’s Offices, Engineering deans, faculty of the college, and the ombudspersons. Other campus personnel have access to records on a need-to-know basis determined by the associate dean of the Student Affairs Office. Nondiscrimination Statement The University of California, in accordance with applicable Federal and State law and the University’s nondiscrimination policies, does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, religion, sex (including sexual harassment), gender identity, pregnancy/ childbirth and medical conditions related thereto, disability, age, medical condition (cancer-related), ancestry, marital status, citizenship, sexual orientation, or status as a Vietnam-era veteran or special disabled veteran. This nondiscrimination statement covers admission, access, and treatment in University programs and activities. It also covers faculty (Senate and non-Senate) and staff in their employment. The Campus Climate and Compliance (CCAC) office may be contacted regarding discrimination issues. Sexual or racial harassment, hostile environment, LGBT, hate or bias issues may be directed to Nancy Chu, Director and Title IX/VI Compliance Officer, at tixco@berkeley. edu or (510) 643-7985. Disability issues may be directed to Disability Resolution Officer Derek Coates at ecs@berkeley.edu or (510) 642-2795. More information may also be found at ccac.berkeley.edu. 63 Public Records Inquiries made in person or by phone will be answered only in case of clear necessity. Unless specifically requested by the student not to do so, the following information is considered public and will be provided to individuals upon written request: verification of registration; major; date of admission, attendance, graduation, or proposed date of graduation; honors and scholarships received. Procedures for Access to Records By Student. Students will be given an appointment to review their records after written request. No more than two working days will be required to provide the records for review. Letters of recommendation dated before January 1, 1975, are not subject to disclosure. A page charge of $.25 per copy will be assessed for material duplicated from the student records. Material will be duplicated at the time of the request, if it can be done without delaying service to others. Otherwise, the students will be given a time to return for their copies, within two days from the time of the request. By Third Party. Access to records by a third party (other than those listed under Access to Records above) is available only with the written consent of the student. Information may be released in case of emergency without the consent of the student (for example, by judicial order), to accrediting organizations, in case of health and safety emergencies, or for research purposes. For additional information about such disclosures, consult the printed directive, Policy Governing Disclosures of Information from Student Records, available upon request. The form delegating the student’s authority to release information is available at the desk of each staff member. The third party to whom information is made available must also complete a form which is available at the desk of each staff member and which requires date, reason for review of record, and signature. Furthermore, the third party must also agree that information received must not be given to another party without written consent of the student. Challenge and Hearing. A staff member of the Student Affairs Office will explain information in a student’s record upon request. If the student believes that the record is in error or misleading, an appointment will be made with the associate dean. If, after that appointment, the student is still not satisfied with the explanation, an appeal may be made to the dean of the College of Engineering. If after these appointments the matter is still not resolved, a further appeal may be made to an ombudsperson. Challenge of grades and evaluation of student work is not within the scope of the hearing. Confidential Records The following information in the student’s file and maintained by the Engineering Student Affairs Office is considered confidential and will be released only pursuant to the procedures which follow: 1. Office of the Registrar’s Dean’s Card 2. Correspondence to, about, and from student 3. Scholarship action, recommendations, and grants-in-aid information 4. Student photograph 5. Degree check 6. Student Information Card 7. Transcripts from other schools attended, including high school 8. Copies of petitions 9. Work slips 10. Medical excuses 11. Notes of interviews with deans and curriculum advisers 12. Records of telephone calls 13. Curriculum questionnaire 14. Semester evaluations by Office of the Registrar 15. Copy of admission application and essay 16. Copy of educational test scores 17. Engineering study-list Effective September 1974, records of engineering graduates are maintained for five years after graduation. After that date, only items 1 to 5 will be retained. Records of inactive students are maintained for five years starting from last date of enrollment. After five years, only items 1 to 12 will be retained. Semester grade reports and dean’s cards from the Office of the Registrar for enrolled students are replaced when updated copies are received. The Jeanne Clery Act The University of California Police Department at Berkeley maintains an annual campus safety report in compliance with the Jeanne Clery Act. It includes the year’s campus crime statistics, information about safety services, crime prevention strategies, emergency preparedness guidelines, and more. For a copy of this report, Safety Counts, please contact the University of California Police Department, Berkeley, by phone at (510) 6426760 or email at police@berkeley.edu. You can also download a PDF of Safety Counts at police.berkeley.edu/safetycounts. Photo Credits Alsak Raanes: page 5 (bottom); UC Berkeley Concrete Canoe Team: page 7; Cindy Manly-Fields: page 10; Terry Johnson: page 13 (middle); Peg Skorpinski: pages 12, 19 (top), 21, 24 (top); Aaron Walburg: page 20 (bottom); David Attwood: page 28; Rachel Shaffer: page 31 (top); Institute of Industrial Engineers, UC Berkeley: page 30 (bottom); Michelle Lew: page 33 (middle); Materials Science and Engineering Association: page 34 (top and bottom); UC Berkeley Solar Car Team: page 40 (bottom); UC Berkeley Human Powered Vehicle Team: page 41 (top); Robert Canfield, courtesy of Zimmer Gunsul Fresca, Architects: page 46; Clifton Coleman: page 58 Published by Public Affairs, 09013 0409 5M Academic Calendar 2009-10 Fall Semester 2009 Tele-BEARS Begins Fee Payment Due Fall Semester Begins Welcome Events Instruction Begins Labor Day Holiday Veterans Day Holiday Thanksgiving Holiday Instruction Ends Final Examinations Fall Semester Ends Winter Holiday New Year’s Holiday Tele-BEARS Begins Spring Semester Begins Fee Payment Due Martin Luther King Jr. Holiday Instruction Begins Presidents’ Day Holiday Spring Recess César Chávez Holiday Cal Day Instruction Ends Final Examinations Spring Semester Ends Tele-BEARS Begins First Six-Week Session Memorial Day Holiday Ten-Week Session Eight-Week Session Independence Day Holiday Second Six-Week Session Three-Week Session April 13 August 15 August 20 August 24-28 August 26 September 7 November 11 November 26-27 December 9 December 12-19 December 19 December 24-25 December 31-January 1, 2010 October 19, 2009 January 12 January 15 January 18 January 19 February 15 March 22-26 March 26 April 17 May 10 May 13-20 May 20 February 1 May 24-July 2 May 31 June 7-August 13 June 21-August 13 July 5 July 6-August 13 July 26-August 13 Monday Saturday Thursday Monday-Friday Wednesday Monday Wednesday Thursday-Friday Wednesday Saturday-Saturday Saturday Thursday-Friday Thursday-Friday Monday Tuesday Friday Monday Tuesday Monday Monday-Friday Friday Saturday Monday Thursday-Thursday Thursday Monday Monday-Friday Monday Monday-Friday Monday-Friday Monday Tuesday-Friday Monday-Friday Spring Semester 2010 Summer Sessions 2010 2009-2010 announcement College of Engineering A Guide to Undergraduate and Graduate Study coe.berkeley.edu University of California, Berkeley Educating Leaders. 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This note was uploaded on 11/03/2009 for the course E 10 taught by Professor Righter during the Spring '08 term at University of California, Berkeley.

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