Skeletal-joint

Skeletal-joint - Click to edit Master subtitle style...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–15. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: Click to edit Master subtitle style Skeletal Structure Primary Functions of Bone l supports the soft tissues of the body so that the form of the body and an erect posture can be maintained l protects delicate structures l blood cell production- RBC, WBC, & platelets produced in red marrow l storage for calcium & phosphorus; reserve lipid in yellow marrow l lever system with muscles-directs forces generated by muscles Classified by Shape l long bones : longer than wide, shaft with 2 ends (femur, humerus) Classified by Shape l short bones : length equals width (carpals, tarsals) Classified by Shape l flat bones : thin and flat (cranium, sternum, ribs, scapula) Classified by Shape l irregular bones : complex shapes (vertebrae, middle ear bones) Classified by Shape l sesamoid bones : small bones formed in tendons (patella) Structure l diaphysis: shaft; epiphyseal line separates it from the epiphysis Structure l epiphysis: end; contains red bone marrow (epiphyseal line #4) Structure l articular cartilage: hyaline cartilage on joint surfaces to resist friction (#3) Structure (cont) l periosteum: dense, white, fibrous covering around the remaining surface of the bone – outer layer: composed of connective tissue containing blood vessels – inner osteogenic layer: contains elastic fibers, blood vessels, and osteoblasts (cells responsible for forming new bone during growth and repair) Structure (cont) l medullary cavity: space within the diaphysis that contains the fatty yellow marrow in adult bones (#7) Structure (cont) l endosteum: layer of osteoblasts that lines the medullary cavity and contains scattered osteoclasts (cells that may assume a role in the removal of bone) l nutrient foramen: opening allowing vessels to enter the medullary cavity supplying the shaft of the bone (arteries to the epiphysis generally arise from the joint capsule) Bone Density l Compact bone: dense bone of the diaphysis consisting of repeating patterns of solid bone tissue organized into concentric layers (long bones) l Spongy or cancellous bone: latticework (large spaces) arrangement packed with red marrow;...
View Full Document

This note was uploaded on 11/03/2009 for the course KINE 306 taught by Professor Kiffin during the Spring '09 term at Texas A&M.

Page1 / 61

Skeletal-joint - Click to edit Master subtitle style...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 15. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online