Bio Lab (2) - Feraru 1 Mihai Lucian Feraru October 22, 2009...

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Feraru 1 Mihai Lucian Feraru October 22, 2009 Section C1 Enzyme Activity Lab Report Effects of Temperature on the Rate of the Enzyme-Catalyzed Reactions (alkaline phosphatase) Abstract This experiment was done in order to assay the effects of temperature on an enzyme catalyzed reaction. The reaction was measured at different temperatures ranging from 0° C to 100° C. The enzyme alkaline phosphatase was used to catalyze the reaction, and the resulting absorbencies of the test tubes were compared to those of the control test tubes. Results indicate that the test tubes that were catalyzed by the enzyme had much higher absorbencies than the test tubes without the enzyme. Our results also indicate that the optimal temperature for the enzyme alkaline phosphatase to function best is 37° C. Introduction Many reactions have high activation energies, which makes it impossible for them to proceed on their own, and require a catalyst. An enzyme is a molecule that accelerates chemical reactions in an organism, by lowering the activation energy necessary for the initialization of that reaction (Solomon et al ., 2005). The rates of the chemical reactions where an enzyme is used can differ with varying conditions, such as pH, and in this experiment, temperature. The enzyme used in this experiment is alkaline phosphatase, and its function is to convert p-Nitro-Phenyl Phosphate (pNPP), which is the substrate, to p-Nitrophenol (pNP) and inorganic phosphate (Pi), which represent the products (Davis
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Bio Lab (2) - Feraru 1 Mihai Lucian Feraru October 22, 2009...

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