Chapter 13 Review

Chapter 13 Review - Chapter 13 13.1 Water is a renewable...

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Chapter 13 13.1 Water is a renewable resource, purified and distributed in the hydrological cycle, which is driven by solar energy. The Earth has an enormous quantity of water, but only a small fraction of it is available for human use. This fact underscores the importance of managing it wisely. 13.2 Where Does Water Come from and Who Uses It? -Most water comes from surface water supplies like rivers, streams, and lakes. -Globally, agriculture and industry are the major users of water.
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Water Shortages Water shortages occur virtually everywhere. They’re most prevalent in areas that receive small amounts of precipitation, but can occur in any region in which demand exceeds existing water supplies. Factors likely to make water shortages even more prevalent in coming years: population growth agricultural expansion demand for water by the industrial sector Drought and Water Shortages Droughts occur naturally but may also result from human actions such as overgrazing and deforestation. Droughts reduce water supplies and create significant social, economic, and environmental problems. Impacts of Water Supply System Much of the water removed from a source never returns to its source. Water comes to us via an elaborate and costly system that has a tremendous impact on the environment. Understanding the system and its impacts may help us design more sustainable systems of water supply. When demand becomes excessive, impacts start to become evident - Rivers run dry for extended periods - Habitat disappears - Population of aquatic species are reduced - Aquifers dry up - Salt water intrudes into freshwater aquifers
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Dams and reservoirs have many benefits, such as flood control and water storage. They also have profound impacts on people, wildlife, and the economy.
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Chapter 13 Review - Chapter 13 13.1 Water is a renewable...

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