2. BvS - Fascism v Jesus.docx - \u2018Batman v Superman\u2019 Is Really Just Fascism v Jesus Matthew Gault Playboy billionaire Bruce Wayne sulks in the

2. BvS - Fascism v Jesus.docx - u2018Batman v...

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‘Batman v Superman’ Is Really Just Fascism v JesusMarch 25, 2016 Matthew Gault Playboy billionaire Bruce Wayne sulks in the batcave watching footage of Superman. He thinks the alien is a threat and he wants to do something about it. Alfred, his butler and constant companion, urges caution.“This is how the fever starts,” he says. “That feeling of powerlessness that turns good men cruel.” He’s right and Wayne follows through in a textbook manner — becoming the kind of blunt instrument of cruelty he once fought against. This is an early scene in Batman v Superman:Dawn of Justice, which may as well be Dawn of Fascism.Director Zack Snyder spends two and a half hours throwing toys together, misunderstanding the heart and soul of American icons and pushing Batman to extremes even The Dark Knight Returns author Frank Miller might find disturbing.For his film, Snyder turns the caped crusader into a fascist and pits him against a dominionist warrior-Christ. If Snyder had more talent it would be an interesting battle. Instead it’s a film of sound, fury and missed opportunity.Batman v Superman is bad, but there’s a good movie buried inside of it. Amy Adams as Lois Lane and Jeremy Irons as Alfred are wonderful. Jesse Eisenberg’s turn as an ultra-literate, awkward Silicon Valley douche Lex Luthor is a wonderful update. And Ben Affleck as Bruce Wayne is perfect.Affleck is the best actor to ever play Wayne. He’s smooth, world weary and a little dangerous, like a crazy James Bond. His Batman is good too, but Affleck always seems embarrassed in the suit. Which makes sense. He’s an Oscar award winning director and screenwriter and an avid comic book fan. He probably knew how bad the dialogue and the direction was in every scene.The problems of Batman v Superman fall largely at the feet of director Snyder and screenwriter David S. Goyer — who’s only ever as good as the director he’s working with. The film is bloated, pondering nonsense. It also suffers from being a launch pad for the entire DC Comics

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