COM 225 Chapter 5 - Relational competence COM 225 Spring...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–11. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Relational competence COM 225 Spring 2009
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Overview Relational and content messages Relational themes Social comparison theory Effects of relational messages Relational patterns Empathy and perspective taking
Background image of page 2
Relational and content messages Content messages Verbal What is “actually said” Relational messages Often nonverbal Says something about “how participants feel about each other”
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Examples of content and relational messages Relational message may give a “neutral” content message meaning “Shut the door” “Call me tomorrow” Relational and content message may repeat or contradict one another: “I love you so much”
Background image of page 4
The weight of content vs. relational messages Why do we use nonverbal channels to send relational messages? When are we more likely to pay attention to relational messages?
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Consequences of relational messages Relational definitions Relational cultures Relational contracts How do relational messages help us define relationships?
Background image of page 6
Relational themes What are relational themes? Dominance-submission Emotional arousal Composure Similarity Formality Task-social orientation Intimacy
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Dominance-submission One-up (dominant) One-down (submissive) One-across (neutral)
Background image of page 8
In-Class Activity Label paper 1-16 Use these labels for statements: Up = one-up Down = one-down Across = one-across
Background image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Examples of dominance messages: 1 1_ Mary: “I don’t know what to do tonight.” 2_ Joe: “Me neither.” 3_ Mary: “Well, you could decide.” 4_ Joe: “Whatever you want.” Label as: Up, down, across
Background image of page 10
Image of page 11
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 36

COM 225 Chapter 5 - Relational competence COM 225 Spring...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 11. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online