Lecture+Ch+10+d

Lecture+Ch+10+d - Ch 10 Application of aqueous equilibria...

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Ch 10 – Application of aqueous equilibria
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Ch 10 – Recap Last time we talked about : Solubility equilibria Ionic molecules, upon dissolving, will ALL dissociate and produce aqueous phase versions of the cations and anions composing them. Le Châtelier’s principle a change is imposed on a system at equilibrium will react in a manner that tends to reduce that change. 1 – change in amount of species increase on one side drive rx to the other side 2 – change in total pressure increase in pressure favors the side w/ fewest molecules (ie to decrease the pressure) 3 – change in temperature increase in temperature favors the side which requires heat ( H) But if solid is equilibrium, must be described by sp
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Ch 10 – Application of aqueous equilibria Background: what you need to know about naming ionic compounds: NO 3 − = “nitrate” NH 4 + = “ammonium” PO 4 3− = “phosphate” SO 4 2− = “sulfate” CO 3 2− = “carbonate” CN− = “cyanide” H 3 O+ = “hydronium” OH− = “hydroxide” 1. Compounds with group 1 and 2 metals – know the name AND symbol. - NaCl = sodium chloride, CaF 2 = calcium fluoride, etc. 2. Compounds with the first row of the transition metals – name AND symbol: - CoCl 2 = cobalt(II) chloride, VCl 3 = vanadium(III) chloride, etc. 3. Compounds with the following “common” polyatomic ions – formula, charge, and name: C 2 O 4 2− = “oxalate” CrO 4 2− = “chromate” MnO 4 − = “permanganate” ClO 4 − = “perchlorate” Anything not here you will be told the name/formula of.
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But, we also know what the equilibrium position for these dissociations should represent, stability-wise: CaF 2 (s) Ca2+(aq) + 2 F−(aq) K eq = [Ca2+] [F−]2 NOTE: There is no K P for this reaction as all species in K eq are aqueous. As we will see for acids and bases, this reaction is very specific so that we give the equilibrium constant a special name and symbol: Ch 10 – Application of aqueous equilibria K eq = [Ca2+] [F−]2 = K sp “solubility product” We should see general relationships between the size of K sp and the stability of the ions: - If K sp is large, the ions produced must be stable and this generally relates to an increase in the solubility of the ionic solid. - If K
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Lecture+Ch+10+d - Ch 10 Application of aqueous equilibria...

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