Lecture+R+last

Lecture+R+last - Our sponsor Sherri Rowland Nobel Prize...

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Nobel Prize 1995 21 years after first ozone publication Our sponsor Sherri Rowland He described how a man-made pollutant catalytically destroys ozone in the upper atmosphere, causing a worldwide health crisis
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Overview of Final Here’s what’s on the test: Midterm 1: 25 points multiple choice, true false, short answer Midterm 2: 25 points multiple choice, true false, short answer Chp 14, 15: 50 points multiple choice, true false, text problems Will be long (2 hr) but straight-forward, go over old tests, all assigned homework problems
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The exam will be closed-book w/ periodic table and constants to use. You will bring an official UCI Picture Identification Card if you don’t have it, your test won’t count one 3 x 5 card (a "cheat sheet") Calculator (I will make test so that graphing calculator is not an advantage
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Ch 10 – Recap - Equilibria - Collision theory - Rates of reaction - Equilibrium constant PCl 3 (g) + Cl 2 (g) PCl 5 (g) Rate = k[X] the rate law, where k is the rate constant “K eq ”= [C] eq c [D] eq d [A] eq a [B] eq b = aA + bB cC + dD [products] p [reactants] r
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Ch 10 – Recap The REACTION QUOTIENT , Q , based on any non-equilibrium conditions Q = [C] [D] [A] [B] A + B C + D non-equilibrium [ ]’s used, in the book as ( ) Q is the “crystal ball” since it can predict a reaction’s future. Eg, if Q < K eq Q α [products] [reactants] must get bigger must get smaller Q −Δ PCl 5 + Δ Cl 2 PCl 3 0.100 M 0.000 M 0.000 M + Δ PCl 3 + Δ Cl 2 0.100 Δ PCl 5 And how to set up an ICE table, based on the balance equation PCl 3 (g) + Cl 2 (g) PCl 5 (g) C hange E C I I nitial E nding
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Ch 10 – Recap Solubility equilibria Ionic molecules, upon dissolving, will ALL dissociate and produce aqueous phase versions of the cations and anions composing them. Le Châtelier’s principle a change is imposed on a system at equilibrium will react in a manner that tends to reduce that change. 1 – change in amount of species increase on one side drive rx to the other side 2 – change in total pressure increase in pressure favors the side w/ fewest molecules (ie to decrease the pressure) 3 – change in temperature increase in temperature favors the side which requires heat ( Δ H) But if solid is equilibrium, must be described by Solubility Product, K sp
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Review 8 hints/steps to figuring out equilibrium problems 1 – Read the problem all the way through. Figure out what you need to calculate. You may be able to skip/not perform some of these steps if you carefully read the problem. 2 – GET THE BALANCED CHEMICAL REACTION, WITH THE PHASE OF EACH SPECIES LISTED!! The common theme in equilibrium problems is a reaction, so you pretty much always have to start with the reaction itself. Remember – pure liquids/solids “don’t count” towards equilibrium. 3 – Ensure the units of your problem and the assumed units of K match up!
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This note was uploaded on 11/04/2009 for the course CHEM Chem 1C taught by Professor Farmer during the Spring '09 term at UCL.

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Lecture+R+last - Our sponsor Sherri Rowland Nobel Prize...

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