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Lecture-34 - General anaesthesia General characteristics of...

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General anaesthesia General characteristics of general anaesthesia Reversible Failure to respond to a noxious stimulus Blockage of cardiovascular, g.i. and respiratory reflexes Amnesia Loss of consciousness Desirable actions of general anaesthetics Loss of consciousness Analgesia Amnesia Muscle relaxation No single agent yet identified is an ideal anaesthetic
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Stages of anaesthesia
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Anaesthetic gases (eg. nitrous oxide ) and volatile anaesthetics (egs. halothane , enflurane ) are administered to patients via inspired air. Volatile anaesthetics must first be vaporized. Anaesthesia depends on the brain (or spinal cord?) concentration of inhalational anaesthetic. Anaesthetic must partition from inspired air into blood water and then from blood into brain. Uptake of anaesthetic into brain depends on 1. the concentration of anaesthetic in inspired air 2. the rate of pulmonary ventilation 3. Solubility of anaesthetic in air, water and lipid. Blood/gas partition coefficient, ( P b/g ) determines blood anaesthetic levels.
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