AP-bulletin_2007-08

AP-bulletin_2007-08 - Bulletin for AP Students andParents...

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Unformatted text preview: Bulletin for AP Students andParents ® 2007-08 Your guide to the AP Program Inside: • AP student planning calendar • What you need to know for exam day • Descriptions of the 37 AP Exams • 2008 AP Exam schedule 2 Bulletin for AP Students and Parents 2 007-08 calendar AP Student Planning Calendar 2008 Think about the exams you plan on taking in May. • Have you taken a practice AP® E xam? Review released freeresponse questions on www.collegeboard.com/apstudents to familiarize yourself with the exam. Complete released exams are available for sale on store.collegeboard.com. Many AP teachers conduct practice sessions with released exams to help students get a feel for the actual AP Exam administration. May January–March Important Deadlines and Reminders Take AP Exams, which are offered May 5–9 and 12–16. • Do you usually carry your cell phone, PDA, pager, MP3 player, or any other electronic device to school? For reasons of exam security, these items are not allowed in the testing room. Don’t risk having them confiscated. • Do you know your AP number? Your AP number is located in your AP Student Pack, which you’ll receive from your AP Coordinator or proctor. It links all of your exam materials to you. On exam day, you will be asked to label your exam materials with your AP number. Tip: Keep a copy of your AP number label or write your number somewhere safe, so that you can find it later. • Will you need testing accommodations? If so, see page 9. If you haven’t already submitted your Services for Students with Disabilities (SSD) Eligibility Form, be sure to talk to your SSD Coordinator about the accommodations you’ll need for the May exams. For more information, visit www.collegeboard.com/ssd. Note these deadlines: • February 22: By this date, your school will need to submit a complete SSD Eligibility Form for you if your request requires Documentation Review. • March 7: By this date, your school will need to submit a complete SSD Eligibility Form for you if you do not need to submit documentation for review. (See the Eligibility Form for more details.) • Are you homeschooled or do you attend a school that doesn’t offer AP Exams? In either case, review the instructions on pages 8 and 9, and note these deadlines: Reread this bulletin. It’s especially important to review the exam security information and what to bring and what not to bring to the exam (see page 8). Continue to work hard in your AP courses and to prepare for your AP Exams. • Are any of your AP Exams scheduled for the same date and time? Check the exam schedule on the back cover. If you have a conflict, ask your AP Coordinator for information about taking one of the exams during the late-testing period. • Is your calculator appropriate for use on the exams in Calculus, Chemistry, Statistics, or Physics? Check www.collegeboard.com/apstudents for a list of AP-approved calculators. June–October April • March 1: Deadline to contact AP Services for a list of local AP Coordinators at whose schools you might be able to test. • March 15: Deadline to contact AP Coordinators identified by AP Services. Students receive their AP Exam grades by mail in July. Here are some deadlines to remember for ordering your AP Exam grades and exam materials. • June 15: If you want to withhold one or more of your exam grades or change the grade report recipient for your 2008 AP Exams, AP Services must receive your request in writing by this date. Grades may be canceled at any time, but if you prefer that your grades for 2008 not be sent to the college you indicated on your answer sheet, you must notify AP Services by this date. • July 1: Grades by Phone available. • September 15: Deadline for ordering your freeresponse booklets from 2008. • October 31: Deadline for requesting the MultipleChoice Rescore Service. © 2007 The College Board. All rights reserved. Visit the College Board on the Web: www.collegeboard.com. 3 Bulletin for AP Students and Parents 2 007-08 students AP Students: Congratulations on being a part of one of the most challenging and exciting academic programs available today, the College Board’s Advanced Placement Program® (AP). By taking college-level AP courses and exams, you and more than one million of your peers are taking an important step on the path to college success. The Bulletin for AP Students and Parents contains information about AP Exams, the AP Exam administration, and exam security policies and procedures designed to provide all students with a fair and uniform testing experience. Please read the contents of the Bulletin carefully. On exam day, you will sign an answer sheet, indicating that you understand and agree to the policies and procedures in the Bulletin. The Bulletin for AP Students and Parents is also published in Spanish. You can download free copies of the Boletín para estudiantes de AP y sus padres at www.collegeboard.com/apstudents or order free printed copies by calling 212 713-8066. parents Parents and Guardians: Your influence in your child’s life is critical in the high school years, when both students and parents are faced with many choices regarding education and the future. Students are under enormous pressures to succeed in their classes, to perform well on standardized tests, to find a college, and to prepare for the rigors of higher education. Participating in the AP Program can provide significant benefits for your child. The rich course material, classroom discussions, and demanding assignments typical of an AP course can help students develop the content mastery and critical thinking skills expected of college students. We encourage you to review the contents of the Bulletin with your child. With this symbol we direct you to several areas of this publication of particular interest and importance to parents. Contents Challenge Yourself: Take AP Courses ...................................................4 Put Your Knowledge to the Test: Take AP Exams ................................4 How to Register for AP Exams..............................................................4 Exam Fees .............................................................................................5 Exam Grades .........................................................................................5 Exam Security Policies and Procedures ...............................................6 What You Need to Know for Exam Day ...............................................7 Additional Information ..........................................................................8 AP Grade Reporting Services ............................................................. 10 Exam Descriptions............................................................................... 11 2008 AP Exam Schedule, Contacts ...................................... back cover Preparing for AP Exams On www.collegeboard.com/apstudents: • Free Web Resources: You can download freeresponse questions and scoring guidelines for each AP subject free of charge. On store.collegeboard.com: • Released Exams: AP Released Exam books contain a complete copy of an AP Exam, an answer key, and sample student responses and scoring commentary. • PCD® CD-ROMs: Prepare for the exams A in Calculus AB, English Literature, European History, and U.S. History with these comprehensive CD-ROMs. The College Board: Connecting Students to College Success The College Board is a not-for-profit membership association whose mission is to connect students to college success and opportunity. Founded in 1900, the association is composed of more than 5,200 schools, colleges, universities, and other educational organizations. Each year, the College Board serves seven million students and their parents, 23,000 high schools, and 3,500 colleges through major programs and services in college admissions, guidance, assessment, financial aid, enrollment, and teaching and learning. Among its bestknown programs are the SAT®, the PSAT/NMSQT®, and the Advanced Placement Program ® (AP ®). The College Board is committed to the principles of excellence and equity, and that commitment is embodied in all of its programs, services, activities, and concerns. For further information, visit www.collegeboard.com. © 2007 The College Board. All rights reserved. College Board, Advanced Placement Program, AP, APCD, AP Central, SAT, and the acorn logo are registered trademarks of the College Board. connect to college success is a trademark owned by the College Board. PSAT/NMSQT is a registered trademark of the College Board and National Merit Scholarship Corporation. All other products and services may be trademarks of their respective owners. Visit the College Board on the Web: www.collegeboard.com. 4 Bulletin for AP Students and Parents 2 007-08 courses Challenge Yourself: Take AP Courses Participating in the AP Program gives you the opportunity to take college-level courses while you’re still in high school. With 37 courses in 22 subject areas, there’s bound to be a course that matches your interests. You’ll find AP courses in art, languages, the social sciences, and more. Discover the joys of learning by studying subjects in greater depth and detail. AP courses demand skills that can lead to success in college. You’ll have the opportunity to develop the writing skills, problemsolving techniques, and study habits that are expected of college students. Plus, taking rigorous AP courses demonstrates your maturity, willingness to push yourself intellectually, and commitment to academic excellence, which can help you stand out in the college admissions process. How to Enroll in AP Courses Talk to an AP teacher or the AP Coordinator at your school about the course you want to take. Discuss the course workload and any preparation you might need. AP made my daughter more responsible. She couldn’t get by without doing her best work. She had to apply herself, challenge herself, and meet the challenges. Linda Fleury, Parent, Sacramento, California exams Put Your Knowledge to the Test: Take AP Exams Each AP course has a corresponding AP Exam that schools worldwide administer in May. AP Exams are an essential part of the AP experience and provide you—and colleges and universities—with a standardized measure of what you’ve accomplished in the AP classroom. College admissions offices and many high schools expect that students enrolled in an AP course will take the AP Exam at the end of the course. The College Board does not require students to take an AP course before taking an AP Exam. “As a freshman, I was able to skip general ed requirements and head straight into the higher-level classes I wanted to take. Taking AP Exams literally saved me semesters of time.” Brent Wiese, Student, University of Iowa Each exam is based on the subject matter outlined in its corresponding AP Course Description. These booklets can be downloaded free of charge at www.collegeboard.com/apstudents. See pages 11–15 for brief descriptions of each exam. Benefits of Taking AP Exams Your AP Exam grades (if sufficiently high) could earn you credit, placement, or both at thousands of colleges and universities in the United States and around the world, enabling you to move into upperlevel courses in your field of interest, or pursue a double major, or gain time to study or travel abroad. Taking an AP Exam also lets you experience a college-level exam. Your work will be evaluated by college and university professors and AP teachers using college-level standards. If you’re worried about how well you’ll do, remember—you risk nothing by taking the exam. You control which colleges (if any) receive your AP Exam grade. Finally, taking AP Exams allows you to earn an AP Scholar Award. Each September, the College Board recognizes with these awards high school students who demonstrated exemplary college-level achievement on the AP Exams. These academic distinctions will strengthen your applications, résumés, etc. You will not receive any monetary award from the College Board. For information about award criteria, go to www.collegeboard.com/apstudents. register How to Register for AP Exams If your school offers AP, contact your AP Coordinator to register for the exams. Your Coordinator will order the necessary materials, collect fees, and let you know exactly when and where to report for the exams. Note: If you are homeschooled, or if you plan to test with accommodations, please see the detailed information on pages 8 and 9. © 2007 The College Board. All rights reserved. Visit the College Board on the Web: www.collegeboard.com. 5 Bulletin for AP Students and Parents 2 007-08 Earning College Credit or Placement With qualifying AP Exam grades, you can earn credit, placement, or both at more than 90 percent of four-year colleges and universities in the United States, as well as at colleges and universities in 40 other countries. At many of these institutions, you can earn up to a full year of college credit (sophomore standing) once you’ve attained a sufficient number of qualifying AP Exam grades. Individual colleges and universities, not the College Board or the AP Program, grant course credit and placement. You should obtain a college’s AP policy in writing; you can find this information in the institution’s catalog or on its Web site, or by using the AP Credit Policy Info search at www.collegeboard.com/ap/creditpolicy. If you’re interested in applying to a college or university outside the United States, you can find information about AP recognition policies at www.collegeboard.com/apintl. Colleges that receive your AP Grade Report will typically notify you during the summer of any placement, credit, or exemption you have earned. You can also contact the college’s admissions office to find out the status of your AP credits. You may take as many AP Exams as you wish, in any combination, with the following qualifications: • You may not take both Calculus AB and Calculus BC in one year. • If you want to take two exams that are scheduled for the same time, ask your Coordinator for information about taking one of the exams during the late-testing period. • You may submit more than one Studio Art portfolio (though not the same type of portfolio). However, you may not duplicate works or slides among the portfolios, and portfolios may not be combined. For example, if you want to submit a portfolio for both Drawing and 2-D Design, you will need to submit two separate portfolios and pay two separate fees. • You may repeat an exam in a subsequent year. In this case, both grades will be reported unless you request that one be withheld or canceled (see page 10). Students taking AP Exams give permission to the College Board to release their contact information to researchers supportive of the College Board’s mission. fees Exam Fees The fee for each exam is $ 84. The amount you pay, however, may vary: • The College Board provides a $22 fee reduction* per exam for students with acute financial need. In addition, your school may forgo its $8 rebate for each fee-reduced exam, making the final cost to you $54 per exam. Most states provide federal and/or state funds to supplement the College Board fee reduction. Check with your AP Coordinator to learn more about fee reductions and state and district subsidies. • If you paid for an AP Exam but then decided not to take it, you may ask your Coordinator for a refund, but only if you did not begin the exam. Once you begin an exam—that is, once you write on an exam booklet or answer sheet—you cannot receive a refund. Local school policy determines the amount of the refund. You may be required by your school to pay the $13 fee the school is charged for each unused exam. * or internal purposes, such as an audit or invoice verification, a state may request from F the College Board the names of its public school students who receive fee reductions; in such cases, the state will agree to maintain the confidentiality of such data. grades Exam Grades Your AP Exam grade is a weighted combination of your scores on the multiple-choice section and on the free-response section. The final grade is reported on a 5-point scale: 5 = extremely well qualified 4 = well qualified 3 = qualified 2 = possibly qualified 1 = no recommendation The AP Program conducts studies in all AP subjects to compare the performance of AP students with that of college students in comparable college courses. These studies help set the “cut points” that determine how AP students’ composite scores are translated into an AP grade of 1 to 5. In general, an AP grade of 5 is equivalent to the average score for college students earning grades of A. The lowest composite scores for AP grades of 4, 3, and 2 are equivalent to the average scores for students with college grades of B, C, and D, respectively. © 2007 The College Board. All rights reserved. Visit the College Board on the Web: www.collegeboard.com. 2 007 6 Bulletin for AP Students and Parents 2 007-08 security Exam Security Policies and Procedures The AP Program’s standards and procedures for administering exams have two primary goals: to give students equal opportunity to demonstrate their abilities, and to prevent students from gaining unfair advantages. Therefore, the AP Program reserves the right to cancel any grade when, in its judgment, any of the following occurs: 1. Violation of exam security policies and procedures: On exam day, you are required to sign your answer sheet, indicating that you are aware of, and agree to, all of the policies in the Bulletin. You also must sign the covers of the multiple-choice and free-response booklets, affirming statements related to the security of the exam. The exam security policies and procedures you agree to are: • Exams must be administered on the established schedule. The exam administration may never begin before the official starting time, and may begin only up to one hour after the official starting time on the specified days. If an exam is offered to you at an incorrect date or time, you must refuse to take it; instead, contact the Office of Testing Integrity to arrange to take an alternate exam. • Exam materials must be kept sealed so that no one sees the questions beforehand. • Because multiple-choice questions are sometimes reused, no one must see the multiple-choice questions except you, the student, during the exam. • You should not, under any circumstances, take multiple-choice questions from the room; give them to anyone else; discuss them with anyone (including your AP teacher); or share them through any means, including, but not limited to, e-mail, text messages, a camera phone, and the Internet. • You are not permitted to discuss the free-response questions until 48 hours after the regularly scheduled exam administration. Free-response questions that appear on alternate forms of the exam may never be discussed. • Cell phones, PDAs, MP3 players, e-mail/messaging devices, and any other electronic or communication devices are prohibited in the exam room. If you are observed using any of these devices during testing or during breaks, you will be dismissed from the exam room, and the device will be confiscated. • You may not consult textbooks, teachers, other students, any electronic devices (including e-mail/messaging devices or cell phones), or any other resources during the break between Sections I and II of the exam, or during any unscheduled breaks. • No one over the age of 21 may take, or review the content of, an AP Exam. Regardless of age, teachers, department chairs, tutors, individuals involved in test preparation services, or educators of any kind (including, but not limited to, curriculum specialists, guidance counselors, or administrators) must not take, or review the content of, an AP Exam. 2. Disclosure of secure test items: If you are discovered disclosing through any means any multiple-choice question, any free-response question from an alternate exam, or any freeresponse question from a regularly scheduled exam within 48 hours of its administration, the AP Program will automatically cancel your exam grade. 3. Misconduct: If the AP Program or administration personnel find that there is misconduct in connection with your exam, you will be asked to turn in your exam materials and leave the testing room. You may not return to the testing room, and your exam grades will automatically be canceled. Misconduct includes, but is not limited to, the following: • Obtaining improper access to the exam, or a part of the exam, or information about the exam. • Referring to, looking through, or working on any exam, or exam section, other than during the timed testing period for that exam or exam section. • Using any prohibited aids. • Bringing food or drink into the testing room.* • Leaving the testing room without permission. • Attempting to remove from the testing room any part of the exam or any notes relating to the exam. • Copying from another student’s work or a published work. • Attempting to give or receive assistance, or otherwise communicate, in any form, with another person about the exam during the exam administration. • Attempting to take the exam for someone else. • Creating a disturbance. • Failing to follow any of the exam administration regulations contained in the Bulletin, given by testing staff, or specified in any exam materials. • Using testing accommodations that have not been preapproved by the College Board. * nless this has been preapproved as an accommodation by the College Board Services U for Students with Disabilities office prior to the exam date. © 2007 The College Board. All rights reserved. Visit the College Board on the Web: www.collegeboard.com. 7 Bulletin for AP Students and Parents 2 007-08 4. Testing irregularities: The term “testing irregularities” refers to problems with the administration of an exam and may affect an individual or group of students. These problems include, but are not limited to, administrative errors (e.g., improper timing, improper seating, defective materials, and defective equipment); improper access to exam content; and other disruptions of exam administrations. When testing irregularities occur, the AP Program may decline to grade the exam or may cancel the grade. When it is appropriate, the AP Program may give students the opportunity to test again as soon as possible without charge. 5. Identification discrepancies: When, in the AP Program’s judgment or the judgment of exam administration personnel, there is a discrepancy in your identification, you may be dismissed from the testing room. In addition, the AP Program may decline to grade your exam or may cancel the grade. 6. Invalid grades: The AP Program may also cancel grades if, in its judgment, there is substantial evidence that they are invalid for any reason. Evidence of invalid grades may include, but is not limited to, discrepant handwriting, unusual answer patterns, or inconsistent performance on different parts of the exam. Before canceling grades for invalidity, the AP Program would notify you in writing about its concerns, give you an opportunity to submit information that addresses the AP Program’s concerns, consider any such information submitted, and may offer you some options. The options could include a voluntary grade cancellation, a free retest, or arbitration in accordance with the ETS Standard Arbitration Agreement. Note: The arbitration option is available only for exams administered in the United States. exam day What You Need to Know for Exam Day In order to have a successful testing experience, you should be aware of what is expected of you and what the conditions will be in the testing room. Carefully review the exam security policies and procedures and the information that follows, and encourage your AP teachers to offer a timed practice exam that is as similar to the actual testing administration as possible. If you have any questions about how exam day will work, talk to your AP Coordinator. Labeling Your AP Exam Materials You must place a 2008 AP bar code number label on each of the exam materials where it is indicated to do so. If you don’t, it may be impossible to match your answer sheet with your exam materials, which could delay or jeopardize your AP grade. Your sheet of number labels is located in the center of the AP Student Pack that will be given to you on or before exam day. • You have a unique number each year you take AP Exams. • Never use anyone else’s AP labels or number. • Always keep a record of your AP number somewhere safe. You will need it throughout the exam administration and in the months following the exam to order grade reports and other services. Completing Exam Responses You must follow the instructions below for completing exam responses. If you deviate from these instructions, your grade may be negatively affected. • All of your answers for the multiple-choice section must be indicated on your answer sheet by filling in the appropriate ovals. Do not write your answers for the multiple-choice section in the exam booklets. If you do, your answers will not be scored. Contacting the Office of Testing Integrity If you observe any behavior that might lead to the invalidation of grades, contact the Office of Testing Integrity as soon as possible. All information will be kept strictly confidential. See the back cover for contact information. • Answers for the free-response section must be written in the Section II exam booklets. Do not write them in the inserts. If you do, your answers will not be scored. • All answers for the free-response section must be in English, with the exception of the exams in Chinese Language and Culture, French Language, French Literature, German Language, Italian Language and Culture, Japanese Language and Culture, Spanish Language, and Spanish Literature. Any responses not adhering to this policy will not be scored. © 2007 The College Board. All rights reserved. Visit the College Board on the Web: www.collegeboard.com. 2 007 8 Bulletin for AP Students and Parents 2 007-08 Reporting Problems During the Administration What to Bring to the Exam Room • Several sharpened No. 2 pencils with erasers for all responses on your multiple-choice answer sheet. • Pens with black or dark blue ink for completing areas on the exam booklet covers and for free-response questions in most exams. • Your six-digit school code. Homeschooled students will be given a code at the time of the exam. • A watch. • An approved calculator with the necessary capabilities if you are taking the AP Calculus, Chemistry, Physics, or Statistics Exams. Visit w ww.collegeboard.com/apstudents to learn more about the calculator policy for each of these exams, and for a list of authorized calculators. • A ruler or straightedge only if you’re taking an AP Physics Exam. If you believe there is a problem while you are taking the exam (e.g., you aren’t given enough time for a section of the exam, or the directions you receive are incorrect), notify your AP Coordinator immediately so that any necessary action can be taken as soon as possible. If that doesn’t resolve the situation, speak to your principal. Reporting Ambiguous or Incorrect AP Exam Questions AP Exam questions are developed and reviewed carefully by qualified professionals who agree on the correct answer. However, if you believe there is a problem with a question, notify AP Assessment Development immediately, and no later than June 15. If necessary, action will be taken before the grades are reported. Be sure to include the following with your communication: • Exam title. • A photo ID if you do not attend the school where you are taking the exam. • Exam section (multiple choice or free response). • Your social security number for identification purposes (optional). If you provide it, the number will appear on your AP Grade Report. • A description of the question and the problem in as much detail as possible. • Your SSD Student Accommodation Letter, which verifies that you have been approved for extended time or another testing accommodation. What NOT to Bring to the Exam Room • Cell phones, PDAs, MP3 players, e-mail/messaging devices, or any other electronic or communication devices. • Books, compasses, correction fluid, dictionaries, highlighters,* notes, or colored pencils.* • Scratch paper; notes can be made on portions of the exam booklets. • Watches that beep or have an alarm. • Question number. • Your complete home mailing address, even if you send a message via e-mail. All communications will be answered by regular mail. Lost or Damaged Exams In extremely rare instances, exams (or portions of exams) get lost or damaged in the shipping and handling process, making it impossible for the AP Program to score a student’s work. After exhausting every effort to locate the missing materials, the AP Program will offer the student two options: The student may retake the missing portion of the exam, which is then scored, or the student can choose to cancel the exam and receive a refund. more Additional Information • Portable listening* or recording devices (even with headphones) or photographic equipment. Information for Homeschooled Students or Students Whose Schools Do Not Offer AP • Computers.* • Clothing with subject-related information. • Food or drink.* * nless this has been preapproved as an accommodation by the College Board U Services for Students with Disabilities office prior to the exam date. If you are a homeschooled student or you attend a school that does not offer AP, you can still take the exams by arranging to test at a participating school. Call AP Services no later than March 1 to get the names and phone numbers of local AP Coordinators. Prepare a list of the exams you plan to take prior to calling so that the appropriate schools and Coordinators can be identified. Then contact the AP © 2007 The College Board. All rights reserved. Visit the College Board on the Web: www.collegeboard.com. 9 Bulletin for AP Students and Parents 2 007-08 Coordinators identified by AP Services no later than March 15. When calling Coordinators to arrange testing, be sure to tell them: • You are trying to locate a school willing to administer exams to homeschooled students or students from schools that do not offer AP Exams. • The exams you plan to take. • If you have a documented disability that will require testing accommodations at the exam, and if you have been approved by the College Board to test with accommodations. • You will use a different school code so your exam grade(s) will be reported separately from the school at which you test. Homeschooled students will use the state homeschool code given to them on the day of the exam; students whose schools do not offer AP will use their own school’s code. Once you locate a school willing to administer your exams, that school’s AP Coordinator is responsible for ordering your exam materials, telling you when and where to report for the exams, and collecting your fees, which may be negotiated to recover additional proctoring or administration costs. That school must administer the exams for you; the school cannot forward exam materials to you or your school for handling. You must bring a valid governmentissued photo ID with you to the exam. If you have approval from the College Board to test with accommodations, you must also bring your Student Accommodation Letter. Information for Students Testing with Accommodations If you have a documented disability, you may be eligible for accommodations on the AP Exams. Examples include extended time; large-type exams; large-block answer sheets; Braille; permission to use a Braille device, computer, or magnifying device; a reader to dictate questions; a writer to record responses; a written copy of oral instructions; as well as other accommodations. Practice materials in Braille are available for most exams. Contact College Board Services for Students with Disabilities if Braille or other formats are needed. To receive testing accommodations, a Student Eligibility Form must be submitted. In most cases, students work together with their school’s SSD Coordinator to submit the form and required documentation. Your school should already have copies of this form. You can view a sample copy on the Web at www.collegeboard.com/ssd under “Forms and Resources,” though only an original scannable form may be submitted. Under certain circumstances, additional documentation is also required. The instructions that accompany the form provide more information. Contact your school’s SSD Coordinator or the College Board’s SSD office for more information (see back cover for contacts). If you have already received College Board–approved accommodations for AP Exams, the PSAT/NMSQT®, or the SAT®, you do not need to submit a new form unless: • You change schools, in which case you will need to submit Section I of a new Eligibility Form. • You need different accommodations. (Keep in mind that AP Exams in world languages and Music Theory include listening and speaking components.) In this case, your school’s SSD Coordinator must submit an Accommodations Change Request Form, with supporting documentation. It is available on the Web at www.collegeboard.com/ssd under “Forms and Resources.” Your complete Eligibility Form and/or documentation must be submitted by: • February 22 for students with disabilities whose forms require Documentation Review. • March 7 for students with disabilities whose forms do not require Documentation Review. The Eligibility Form indicates when documentation review is required. Grades for students who test with accommodations that have not been preapproved by the College Board will not be reported. You are your own best advocate for ensuring that you receive the testing accommodations you need; this means that you, the student, are also responsible for following through on the required procedures. Discuss your needs with your SSD Coordinator as early as possible before the deadlines, then confirm with him or her that everything has been submitted. You share the responsibility for ensuring that your Eligibility Form has been submitted—and approved—and that you will receive the accommodations you need. It is important to note that students that qualify for accommodations under plans such as the Individualized Education Program (IEP) or Section 504 are not automatically approved for accommodations for AP Exams. Check with your school’s SSD Coordinator to be certain all paperwork is properly completed and submitted. Information for Students Testing in California Amendments to the California Education Code require the College Board to adopt certain procedures for students who take AP Exams in California. A provision of this law mandates that students must be able to obtain certain information concerning the purpose of the exams, procedures for releasing grade reports, grade interpretations, and the use of exam grades. Much of this information is provided in the Bulletin. For more detailed information, students in California can download the 2007-08 Bulletin for AP Students and Parents–California Supplement at www.collegeboard.com/apstudents. © 2007 The College Board. All rights reserved. Visit the College Board on the Web: www.collegeboard.com. 2 007 10 Bulletin for AP Students and Parents 2 007-08 services AP Grade Reporting Services Service What is it? How can I order? When will I receive it? Initial AP Grade Report • Free (when indicated on the registration answer sheet) • May be ordered when you fill out your answer sheet Each grade report is cumulative—it includes grades from every AP Exam you have ever taken, unless you have requested that one or more grades be withheld or canceled. Indicate grade recipient on your registration answer sheet. Grade reports are sent in July to you, the college you designated on your registration answer sheet, and your high school. Grades by Phone • $8 per call • Available July 1 Receive your AP grades by phone. Call 888 308-0013. Students outside the United States and Canada, call AP Services at 609 771-7300 from 8 a.m. to 4:45 p.m. ET, Monday through Friday. Available 24 hours a day by Touchtone phone, for about six weeks. Additional Grade Reports • $15 per report • $25 per report for rush service • Additional 2008 grade reports are processed beginning the first week of July 2008. If you want to send a grade report to another college (or if you did not specify a grade recipient when you took the exams), you can order an additional grade report. Call AP Services at 888 225-5427 to order additional grade reports by phone. You can also contact AP Services by phone, fax, mail, or e-mail. Or, fill out and send in the College Information Card on the back of your Student Pack. Requests take about one week to process from the date they are received. Rush reports are processed within two working days. Grade requests must be received with payment or they will not be processed. Withholding a Grade • $10 per grade, per college; no charge to release grades, but you must pay the grade report fee to have the grade sent (see above) • Order by June 15 to withhold 2008 exam grades If you do not want your grade sent to the college you designated, you may request that it be withheld. This does not permanently delete your grade; and all grades, even those withheld from colleges, will be sent to you and to your school. The grade will be withheld from all future reports sent to that college, unless you release it. Send a signed, written request to AP Services by mail or fax. See the list below for the information you need to include. To release the grade, send a signed, written request to AP Services. To have the grade sent to the college, include the grade report fee. Requests must be received, with payment, by June 15 to withhold grades from the 2008 administration. After that date, grades will be sent automatically to the college indicated on your registration answer sheet. Canceling your AP Exam grade permanently Canceling a Grade deletes it—it cannot be reinstated at a later • No fee, but exam fees are not time. refunded • Request by June 15 if you do not want the grade to appear on your 2008 grade report Send a signed, written request to AP Services by mail or fax. See the list below for the information you need to include. Requests must be received by June 15 to cancel grades from the 2008 administration. After that date, grades will be sent automatically to the college indicated on your registration answer sheet. Multiple-Choice Rescore Service* • $25 per exam • You have until October 31 of the year you take the exam to order this service You may have your multiple-choice answer sheet rescored by hand. Once it is rescored, that score and your free-response score are weighted and combined, converted into an AP grade and compared to the reported grade. In the event that the grade is different, the rescored grade will prevail, and your grade recipient will be notified of the correct grade. Send a signed, written request to AP Services by mail or fax. See the list below for the information you need to include. You will receive a letter confirming the results of the rescore six to eight weeks after your request is received. Free-Response Booklet • $7 per booklet • May be ordered no later than September 15 You may obtain your free-response booklet. No comments, corrections, or scores are included. Free-response booklets from alternate exams are not available to students who test late. Send a signed, written request to AP Services by mail or fax. See the list below for the information you need to include. You must request your free-response booklet by September 15. You will not be able to obtain your booklet after this date. You will receive your booklet 2–3 weeks after your order is received. * ote: Scores for the multiple-choice section alone are not available. Free-response sections and Studio Art portfolios cannot be reevaluated. N Information You’ll Need to Provide When Requesting Grade Reporting Services • The service you are requesting. • Your full legal name, home address, gender, date of birth, AP number, and social security number (if you provided it). • The full name of the exam for which you are requesting the service (e.g., English Literature and Composition, not English) and the year you took that exam. • A credit card number and expiration date, or a check or money order for the exact amount due. Make checks and money orders payable to AP Exams. • Your signature. • When requesting additional grade reports, include the name, city and state, and college code of the college you would like to receive your report. © 2007 The College Board. All rights reserved. Visit the College Board on the Web: www.collegeboard.com. © 2007 The College Board. All rights reserved. Visit the College Board on the Web: www.collegeboard.com. exam Exam Descriptions Art History Exam Duration: Section I—1 hour Section II—2 hours Course Equivalency: Full-year college course in art history Description: Section I consists of multiplechoice questions, and Section II consists of seven short essays based on slides and/or a quotation from a primary source or document, and also two 30-minute essays addressing typical and significant problems in art history. One of these 30-minute essays requires indepth discussion of at least one work from beyond the European tradition. Studio Art Drawing, Studio Art 2-D Design, Studio Art 3-D Design Exam Duration: Not applicable since grading is based on portfolio evaluations Course Equivalency: One-semester or fullyear college course with the same name or content coverage Description: Portfolio Sections: – Quality (mastery in concept, composition, and execution) Description: Section I consists of multiplechoice questions, and Section II consists of a reading period followed by free-response questions. Sections I and II both test students’ understanding of ideas that unite the major content areas: molecules and cells; heredity and evolution; and organisms and populations. Both sections may include questions based on the objectives of the 12 recommended AP Biology laboratory investigations. Calculus AB Exam Duration: Section I—1 hour and 45 minutes Section II—1 hour and 30 minutes Course Equivalency: Two-thirds of a fullyear college-level calculus sequence Description: Section I consists of multiplechoice questions, and Section II consists of free-response questions. Sections I and II both contain parts where a graphing calculator is required and parts where a graphing calculator is prohibited. Calculus BC The 2008 AP Studio Art Course Description and the 2007-08 Studio Art poster detail requirements for preparing portfolios for submission. Exam Duration: Section I—1 hour and 45 minutes Section II—1 hour and 30 minutes Course Equivalency: Full-year college-level calculus sequence Description: Section I consists of multiplechoice questions, and Section II consists of free-response questions. Sections I and II both contain parts where a graphing calculator is required and parts where a graphing calculator is prohibited. Students taking Calculus BC will receive a subscore grade for the AB portion of the exam in addition to the overall composite grade. Biology Chemistry – Concentration (a body of work investigating an underlying visual idea) – Breadth (demonstration of a wide range of experience in concepts and approaches) Exam Duration: Section I—1 hour and 20 minutes Section II—1 hour and 40 minutes Course Equivalency: Full-year introductory college course in biology with laboratory Exam Duration: Section I—1 hour and 30 minutes Section II—1 hour and 35 minutes Course Equivalency: Full-year introductory college course with laboratory 11 Bulletin for AP Students and Parents 2 007-08 Description: Section I consists of multiplechoice questions. Section II consists of freeresponse questions and is divided into two parts. Part A, during which calculator use is permitted, is 55 minutes long and contains three quantitative problems, one of which is on chemical equilibrium. Part B, during which no calculators are permitted, is 40 minutes long and contains one question requiring students to write balanced equations for three chemical reactions (and to answer a short question about each reaction), plus two essay questions. In every exam either one of the quantitative problems or one of the essays will be on the topic of laboratory. A periodic table is provided for students to use with Sections I and II of the exam, and a list of commonly used equations and constants is provided during Section II of the exam only. Calculators are permitted only for the problems in Part A of Section II. Chinese Language and Culture Exam Duration: Section I—approx. 1 hour and 20 minutes Section II—approx. 1 hour and 25 minutes Course Equivalency: Fourth-semester college/university course in Mandarin Chinese Description: Section I consists of multiplechoice questions that assess communication skills in the interpersonal and interpretive modes using listening and reading questions. Section II consists of free-response questions that assess communication skills in the interpersonal and presentational modes, as well as cultural knowledge, by requiring the student to produce written and spoken responses. It requires students to narrate a story, write a letter, respond to an email message, relay a telephone message, participate in a conversation, make a cultural presentation, and make a presentation on a plan for an event. descriptions descriptions © 2007 The College Board. All rights reserved. Visit the College Board on the Web: www.collegeboard.com. © 2007 The College Board. All rights reserved. Visit the College Board on the Web: www.collegeboard.com. 12 Bulletin for AP Students and Parents 2 007-08 exam Computer Science A Economics—Macroeconomics E xam Duration: Section I—1 hour and 15 minutes Section II—1 hour and 45 minutes Course Equivalency: First-semester introductory college course Description: Section I consists of multiple-choice questions, and Section II consists of free-response questions. At least five multiple-choice questions and one free-response question are based on the AP GridWorld Case Study. This case study, available at www.collegeboard. com/apstudents, provides students with illustrations of fundamental programming concepts and a platform that allows them to extend and modify a large program design. Students should work with the case study throughout the school year. Java is used as the programming language for AP Computer Science. E xam Duration: Section I—1 hour and 10 minutes Section II—1 hour Course Equivalency: One-semester introductory college course Description: Section I consists of multiplechoice questions, and Section II consists of free-response questions, including a 10-minute reading and planning period. The AP Macroeconomics Exam covers basic economic concepts; measurement of economic performance; national income and price determination; financial sector; stabilization policies; international economics; and economic growth. Computer Science AB Exam Duration: Section I—1 hour and 15 minutes Section II—1 hour and 45 minutes Course Equivalency: Full-year introductory college course Description: S ection I consists of multiple-choice questions, and Section II consists of free-response questions. At least five multiple-choice questions and one free-response question are based on the AP GridWorld Case Study. This case study, available at www.collegeboard. com/apstudents, provides students with illustrations of fundamental programming concepts and a platform that allows them to extend and modify a large program design. Students should work with the case study throughout the school year. Java is used as the programming language for AP Computer Science. Economics—Microeconomics Exam Duration: Section I—1 hour and 10 minutes Section II—1 hour Course Equivalency: One-semester introductory college course Description: Section I consists of multiplechoice questions, and Section II consists of free-response questions, including a 10-minute reading and planning period. The AP Microeconomics Exam covers basic economic concepts; supply and demand; the theory of consumer choice; production and costs; firm behavior and market structure; factor markets; and market failure and the role of government. English Language and Composition Exam Duration: Section I—1 hour Section II—2 hours and 15 minutes Course Equivalency: Full-year introductory college course Description: Section I consists of multiplechoice questions, and Section II consists of free-response questions, including a 15-minute reading period. The AP English Language and Composition Exam tests students’ skills in analyzing prose passages and asks them to demonstrate their composition skills by writing essays in various rhetorical modes. One of the three free-response questions requires students to synthesize information from a variety of sources to inform their own discussion of a topic. English Literature and Composition Exam Duration: Section I—1 hour Section II—2 hours Course Equivalency: Full-year introductory college course Description: Section I consists of multiplechoice questions, and Section II consists of free-response questions. The AP English Literature and Composition Exam tests students’ skills in analyzing selected poems and prose passages, as well as their ability to write critical or analytical essays based on poems, prose passages, novels, or plays. Environmental Science Exam Duration: Section I—1 hour and 30 minutes Section II—1 hour and 30 minutes Course Equivalency: One-semester introductory college course with laboratory Description: Section I consists of multiplechoice questions. Section II consists of free-response questions. The free-response questions include one data-set question, one document-based question, and two synthesis/ evaluation questions. French Language Exam Duration: Section I—approx. 1 hour and 25 minutes Section II—approx. 1 hour and 15 minutes Course Equivalency: Third-year French Composition or Conversation college course Description: Section I consists of multiplechoice listening and reading comprehension questions. Section II consists of free-response © 2007 The College Board. All rights reserved. Visit the College Board on the Web: www.collegeboard.com. 13 Bulletin for AP Students and Parents 2 007-08 writing and speaking tasks. The exam evaluates students’ ability to understand written and spoken French and to respond in correct and idiomatic French. French Literature E xam Duration: Section I—1 hour and 20 minutes Section II—1 hour and 40 minutes Course Equivalency: Third-year Introduction to French Literature college course Description: Section I consists of multiplechoice questions based on passages; some passages come from the required reading list and others do not. Section II consists of freeresponse questions, and measures students’ ability to understand, analyze, and interpret the literary texts on the reading list, and to write competent critical essays about them in French. German Language Exam Duration: Section I—approx. 1 hour and 20 minutes Section II—approx. 1 hour and 10 minutes Course Equivalency: Third-year college German language course Description: Section I consists of multiplechoice questions. Section II consists of freeresponse writing and speaking tasks. The exam evaluates students’ ability to understand written and spoken German and to respond in correct and idiomatic German. Government and Politics— Comparative Exam Duration: Section I—45 minutes Section II—1 hour and 40 minutes Course Equivalency: One-semester introductory college course Description: Section I consists of multiplechoice questions, and Section II consists of free-response questions. The AP Comparative Government and Politics Exam covers an introduction to comparative politics; sovereignty, authority and power; political institutions; citizens, society, and the state; political and economic change; and public policy. Six countries form the core of this exam: China, Great Britain, Iran, Mexico, Nigeria, and Russia. Government and Politics—United States Exam Duration: Section I—45 minutes Section II—1 hour and 40 minutes Course Equivalency: One-semester introductory college course Description: Section I consists of multiple-choice questions, and Section II consists of free-response questions. The AP United States Government and Politics Exam covers constitutional underpinnings of U.S. government; political beliefs and behaviors; political parties, interest groups, and mass media; institutions of national government (the Congress, the presidency, the bureaucracy, and the federal courts); public policy; and civil rights and civil liberties. History—European Exam Duration: Section I—55 minutes Section II—2 hours and 10 minutes Course Equivalency: Full-year introductory college course Description: S ection I consists of multiplechoice questions. Section II consists of a 15-minute reading period, a 45-minute document-based question (DBQ), and two 35-minute thematic essays chosen from several options. Questions on intellectual– cultural, political–diplomatic, and social– economic history form the basis of every section of this exam. History—United States Exam Duration: Section I—55 minutes Section II—2 hours and 10 minutes Course Equivalency: Full-year introductory college course Description: Section I consists of multiplechoice questions. Section II consists of a 15minute reading period, a 45-minute documentbased question (DBQ), and two 35-minute essays chosen from several options. The exam covers political institutions, behavior, and public policy; social change and cultural and intellectual developments; diplomacy and international relations; and economic developments. History—World Exam Duration: Section I—55 minutes Section II—2 hours and 10 minutes Course Equivalency: Full-year introductory college course Description: Section I consists of multiplechoice questions. Section II consists of a 10-minute reading period, a 40-minute document-based question (DBQ), a 40minute question dealing with continuity and change over time, and a 40-minute comparative question focusing on broad issues in world history. The exam covers change and continuity across world history periods; interaction between humans and the environment; development and interaction of cultures; state-building, expansion, and conflict; creation, expansion, and interaction of economic systems; and development and transformation of social structures. The chronological frame of the course is the period from approximately 8000 b.c.e. to the present. descriptions © 2007 The College Board. All rights reserved. Visit the College Board on the Web: www.collegeboard.com. 14 Bulletin for AP Students and Parents 2 007-08 exam Human Geography Exam Duration: Section I—1 hour Section II—1 hour and 15 minutes Course Equivalency: One-semester introductory college course Description: Section I consists of multiplechoice questions, and Section II consists of free-response questions. The exam covers the nature and perspectives of geography; population; cultural patterns and processes; political organization of space; agricultural and rural land use; industrialization and economic development; and cities and urban land use. Italian Language and Culture Exam Duration: Section I—approx. 1 hour and 20 minutes Section II—approx. 1 hour and 25 minutes Course Equivalency: Fourth-semester college/university course in Italian Description: Section I consists of multiplechoice questions that assess communication skills in the interpretive mode using listening and reading questions. Section II consists of free-response questions that assess communication skills in the interpersonal and presentational modes, as well as cultural knowledge, by requiring the student to produce written and spoken responses. It includes two paragraph completion exercises, two compositions (one on a cultural topic), a spoken narration, and a simulated conversation. Japanese Language and Culture Exam Duration: Section I—approx. 1 hour and 30 minutes Section II—approx. 1 hour and 10 minutes Course Equivalency: 300 hours of collegelevel classroom instruction in Japanese Description: Section I consists of multiplechoice questions that assess communication skills in the interpretive mode using listening and reading questions. Section II consists of free-response questions that assess communication skills in the interpersonal and presentational modes, as well as cultural knowledge, by requiring students to produce written and spoken responses. It requires students to participate in an exchange of textchat messages, write an article, write a Web posting on a cultural topic, participate in two conversations, make a school announcement, narrate a story, and make a cultural presentation. Latin Literature Exam Duration: Section I—1 hour Section II—2 hours Course Equivalency: Intermediate (fourthto sixth-semester) college work on the poems of Catullus and selections from the works of either Cicero, Horace, or Ovid; colleges may cover the material required by the AP course in either one or two semesters. Description: Section I consists of multiplechoice questions based on four Latin passages of poetry or prose (one passage is from the course syllabus and three passages are to be read at sight). Section II includes translations, essays, and short identification questions on the readings required in the course syllabus. Latin: Vergil Exam Duration: Section I—1 hour Section II—2 hours Course Equivalency: Intermediate (fourthto sixth-semester) college work on the Aeneid ; colleges may cover the material required by the AP course in either one or two semesters. Description: Section I consists of multiplechoice questions based on four Latin passages of poetry or prose (one passage is from the course syllabus and three passages are to be read at sight). Section II includes translations and essays on the readings required in the course syllabus. Music Theory Exam Duration: Section I—approx. 1 hour and 20 minutes Section II—approx. 1 hour and 18 minutes Course Equivalency: Full-year introductory college course Description: Section I consists of multiplechoice questions. Section II consists of free-response questions and a sight-singing performance. In the free-response section, students are asked to do two exercises each of melodic and harmonic dictation; two partwriting exercises (one from figured bass, one from Roman numerals); and a composition exercise entailing composing a bass line from a given melody. In the sight-singing component, students are asked to sing two diatonic melodies after a brief practice period. Students will receive subscore grades for the aural (listening and sight-singing) and nonaural (written) portions of this exam in addition to the overall composite grade. Physics B Exam Duration: Section I—1 hour and 30 minutes Section II—1 hour and 30 minutes Course Equivalency: Full-year noncalculus college survey course intended for students not majoring in a physical science or engineering Description: Section I consists of multiplechoice questions, and Section II consists of free-response questions. These assess understanding of ideas in these major content areas: mechanics, fluid mechanics, thermal physics, electricity and magnetism, waves, optics, and atomic and nuclear physics. Tables of commonly used equations are provided for use on the free-response section only. Scientific calculators, including programmable and graphing calculators, are permitted only for the free-response section. © 2007 The College Board. All rights reserved. Visit the College Board on the Web: www.collegeboard.com. 15 Bulletin for AP Students and Parents 2 007-08 Physics C: Mechanics Exam Duration: Section I—45 minutes Section II—45 minutes Course Equivalency: One semester of an introductory college course with calculus, intended for students planning to major in a physical science or engineering Description: Section I consists of multiplechoice questions, and Section II consists of free-response questions. Tables of commonly used equations are provided for use on the free-response section only. Scientific calculators, including programmable and graphing calculators, are permitted only for the free-response section. Physics C: Electricity and Magnetism Exam Duration: Section I—45 minutes Section II—45 minutes Course Equivalency: One semester of an introductory college course with calculus, intended for students planning to major in a physical science or engineering Description: Section I consists of multiplechoice questions, and Section II consists of free-response questions. Tables of commonly used equations are provided for use on the free-response section only. Scientific calculators, including programmable and graphing calculators, are permitted only for the free-response section. Psychology Exam Duration: Section I—1 hour and 10 minutes Section II—50 minutes Course Equivalency: One-semester introductory psychology college course Description: Section I consists of multiplechoice questions, and Section II consists of free-response questions. The exam covers history and approaches; research methods; biological bases of behavior; sensation and perception; states of consciousness; learning; cognition; motivation and emotion; developmental psychology; personality; testing and individual differences; abnormal psychology; treatment of psychological disorders; and social psychology. Spanish Language Exam Duration: Section I—approx. 1 hour and 20 minutes Section II—approx. 1 hour and 40 minutes Course Equivalency: Third-year college course in advanced Spanish Description: Section I consists of multiplechoice questions, and measures listening and reading comprehension in the interpretive mode. Section II consists of free-response questions, and tests the productive skills of speaking and writing as well as command of standard Spanish grammar and usage. Some of the questions in the free-response section integrate several skills (speaking, writing, listening, and reading) and use of interpersonal, interpretive, and presentational modes. Statistics Exam Duration: Section I—1 hour and 30 minutes Section II—1 hour and 30 minutes Course Equivalency: One-semester introductory noncalculus-based college course Description: Section I consists of multiplechoice questions, and Section II consists of free-response questions. The free-response section requires students to answer five open-ended questions and complete an investigative task involving more extended reasoning. The exam covers exploring data; sampling and experimentation (planning and conducting a study); anticipating patterns (exploring random phenomena using probability and simulation); and statistical inference (estimating population parameters and testing hypotheses). Students are expected to bring a graphing calculator with statistical capabilities to the exam, and to be familiar with its use. Graphing calculators may be used for both sections of the exam. Spanish Literature Exam Duration: Section I—1 hour and 20 minutes Section II—1 hour and 50 minutes Course Equivalency: Third-year college introduction to Peninsular and Latin American literature written in Spanish Description: Section I consists of multiplechoice questions on passages; some passages come from the required reading list and others do not. Section II consists of free-response questions, and measures students’ ability to analyze poetry, to interpret the literary texts on the reading list, and to write competent critical essays about them in Spanish. descriptions © 2007 The College Board. All rights reserved. Visit the College Board on the Web: www.collegeboard.com. 2008 AP Exam Schedule Monday, May 5 Tuesday, May 6 Wednesday, May 7 Thursday, May 8 Friday, May 9 Morning 8 a.m. United States Government and Politics Computer Science A Computer Science AB Spanish Language Calculus AB Calculus BC English Literature German Language United States History Afternoon 12 noon Comparative Government and Politics French Language Statistics Chinese Language and Culture French Literature Japanese Language and Culture European History Studio Art (portfolios due) Monday, May 12 Tuesday, May 13 Wednesday, May 14 Thursday, May 15 Friday, May 16 Morning 8 a.m. Biology Music Theory Chemistry Environmental Science English Language Italian Language and Culture Macroeconomics World History Human Geography Spanish Literature Afternoon 12 noon Physics B Physics C: Mechanics Psychology Art History Microeconomics Latin Literature Latin: Vergil 2 p.m. Physics C: Electricity and Magnetism Please note: • Schools may assemble students earlier than these exam start times to complete identifying information on answer sheets. Your AP Coordinator is responsible for letting you know exactly when and where to report for your exams. • Schools in Alaska must begin morning exams between 7 and 8 a.m. and afternoon exams between 11 a.m. and 12 noon. The AP Physics C: Electricity and Magnetism Exam must begin between 1 and 2 p.m. in Alaska. • If you wish to take exams that are scheduled for the same time slot, ask your Coordinator for information about taking one of the exams during the late-testing period. You may not take both Calculus AB and Calculus BC in one year. • Early testing or testing at times other than those listed above are not permitted under any circumstances. Contacts AP Services P.O. Box 6671 Princeton, NJ 08541-6671 Phone: 888 225-5427 (toll free in the United States and Canada) or 609 771-7300 TTY: 609 882-4118 Fax: 610 290-8979 [email protected] For overnight mail: AP Services 1425 Lower Ferry Road Ewing, NJ 08618-6671 College Board Services for Students with Disabilities (SSD) P.O. Box 6226 Princeton, NJ 08541-6226 Phone: 609 771-7137 TTY: 609 882-4118 Fax: 609 771-7944 [email protected] Office of Testing Integrity P.O. Box 6671 Princeton, NJ 08541-6671 Phone: 800 353-8570 (toll free in the United States and Canada) or 609 406-5427 Fax: 609 406-9709 [email protected] AP Assessment Development P.O. Box 6671 Princeton, NJ 08541-6671 Fax: 610 290-8979 [email protected] 743174 Text Printed on 100% Recycled Paper 30% Post-Consumer © 2007 The College Board. All rights reserved. Visit the College Board on the Web: www.collegeboard.com. ...
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This note was uploaded on 11/04/2009 for the course UR 13045 taught by Professor Mr.u during the Spring '09 term at Magnolia Bible.

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