ap06_frq_english_lit

ap06_frq_english_lit - AP® English Literature and...

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Unformatted text preview: AP® English Literature and Composition 2006 Free-Response Questions The College Board: Connecting Students to College Success The College Board is a not-for-profit membership association whose mission is to connect students to college success and opportunity. Founded in 1900, the association is composed of more than 5,000 schools, colleges, universities, and other educational organizations. Each year, the College Board serves seven million students and their parents, 23,000 high schools, and 3,500 colleges through major programs and services in college admissions, guidance, assessment, financial aid, enrollment, and teaching and learning. Among its best-known programs are the SAT®, the PSAT/NMSQT®, and the Advanced Placement Program® (AP®). The College Board is committed to the principles of excellence and equity, and that commitment is embodied in all of its programs, services, activities, and concerns. © 2006 The College Board. All rights reserved. College Board, AP Central, APCD, Advanced Placement Program, AP, AP Vertical Teams, Pre-AP, SAT, and the acorn logo are registered trademarks of the College Board. Admitted Class Evaluation Service, CollegeEd, connect to college success, MyRoad, SAT Professional Development, SAT Readiness Program, and Setting the Cornerstones are trademarks owned by the College Board. PSAT/NMSQT is a registered trademark of the College Board and National Merit Scholarship Corporation. All other products and services may be trademarks of their respective owners. Permission to use copyrighted College Board materials may be requested online at: www.collegeboard.com/inquiry/cbpermit.html. Visit the College Board on the Web: www.collegeboard.com. AP Central is the official online home for the AP Program: apcentral.collegeboard.com. 2006 AP® ENGLISH LITERATURE AND COMPOSITION FREE-RESPONSE QUESTIONS ENGLISH LITERATURE AND COMPOSITION SECTION II Total time—2 hours Question 1 (Suggested time—40 minutes. This question counts as one-third of the total essay section score.) Read the following poem carefully. Then write a well-organized essay in which you analyze how the poet uses language to describe the scene and to convey mood and meaning. Evening Hawk Line 5 From plane of light to plane, wings dipping through Geometries and orchids that the sunset builds, Out of the peak’s black angularity of shadow, riding The last tumultuous avalanche of Light above pines and the guttural gorge, The hawk comes. His wing Scythes down another day, his motion Is that of the honed steel-edge, we hear The crashless fall of stalks of Time. 10 The head of each stalk is heavy with the gold of our error. Look! look! he is climbing the last light Who knows neither Time nor error, and under Whose eye, unforgiving, the world, unforgiven, swings Into shadow. 15 20 Long now, The last thrush is still, the last bat Now cruises in his sharp hieroglyphics. His wisdom Is ancient, too, and immense. The star Is steady, like Plato,* over the mountain. If there were no wind we might, we think, hear The earth grind on its axis, or history Drip in darkness like a leaking pipe in the cellar. —Robert Penn Warren *Greek philosopher (427?–347? B.C.) Copyright © 1998 by Estate of Robert Penn Warren. Reprinted by permission of William Morris Agency, Inc. on behalf of Author. © 2006 The College Board. All rights reserved. Visit apcentral.collegeboard.com (for AP professionals) and www.collegeboard.com/apstudents (for students and parents). GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. 2 2006 AP® ENGLISH LITERATURE AND COMPOSITION FREE-RESPONSE QUESTIONS Question 2 (Suggested time—40 minutes. This question counts as one-third of the total essay section score.) The following passage is an excerpt from Lady Windermere’s Fan, a play by Oscar Wilde, produced in 1892. Read the passage carefully. Then write a well-organized essay in which you analyze how the playwright reveals the values of the characters and the nature of their society. Line 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 DUCHESS OF BERWICK (shaking hands). Dear Margaret, I am so pleased to see you. You remember Agatha,1 don’t you? How do you do, Lord Darlington? I won’t let you know my daughter, you are far too wicked. LORD DARLINGTON. Don’t say that, Duchess. As a wicked man I am a complete failure. Why, there are lots of people who say I have never really done anything wrong in the whole course of my life. Of course they only say it behind my back. DUCHESS OF BERWICK. Isn’t he dreadful? Agatha, this is Lord Darlington. Mind you don’t believe a word he says. No, no tea, thank you, dear. (Sits on sofa.) We have just had tea at Lady Markby’s. Such bad tea, too. It was quite undrinkable. I wasn’t at all surprised. Her own son-in-law supplies it. Agatha is looking forward so much to your ball tonight, dear Margaret. LADY WINDERMERE (seated). Oh, you musn’t think it is going to be a ball, Duchess. It is only a dance in honour of my birthday. A small and early. LORD DARLINGTON (standing). Very small, very early, and very select, Duchess. DUCHESS OF BERWICK. Of course it’s going to be select. But we know that, dear Margaret, about your house. It is really one of the few houses in London where I can take Agatha, and where I feel perfectly secure about dear Berwick. I don’t know what society is coming to. The most dreadful people seem to go everywhere. They certainly come to my parties—the men get quite furious if one doesn’t ask them. Really, some one should make a stand against it. LADY WINDERMERE. I will, Duchess. I will have no one in my house about whom there is any scandal. LORD DARLINGTON. Oh, don’t say that, Lady Windermere. I should never be admitted. (Sitting.) 40 45 50 55 60 65 70 75 1 the Duchess’s daughter DUCHESS OF BERWICK. Oh, men don’t matter. With women it is different. We’re good. Some of us are, at least. But we are positively getting elbowed into the corner. Our husbands would really forget our existence if we didn’t nag at them from time to time, just to remind them that we have a perfect legal right to do so. LORD DARLINGTON. It’s a curious thing, Duchess, about the game of marriage—a game, by the way, that is going out of fashion—the wives hold all the honours2 and invariably lose the odd trick.3 DUCHESS OF BERWICK. The odd trick? Is that the husband, Lord Darlington? LORD DARLINGTON. It would be rather a good name for the modern husband. DUCHESS OF BERWICK. Dear Lord Darlington, how thoroughly depraved you are! LADY WINDERMERE. Lord Darlington is trivial. LORD DARLINGTON. Ah, don’t say that, Lady Windermere. LADY WINDERMERE. Why do you talk so trivially about life, then? LORD DARLINGTON. Because I think that life is far too important a thing ever to talk seriously about it. DUCHESS OF BERWICK. What does he mean? Do, as a concession to my poor wits, Lord Darlington, just explain to me what you really mean. LORD DARLINGTON. I think I had better not, Duchess. Nowadays to be intelligible is to be found out. Good-bye! (Shakes hands with DUCHESS.) And now—Lady Windermere, good-bye. I may come tonight, mayn’t I? Do let me come. LADY WINDERMERE. Yes, certainly. But you are not to say foolish, insincere things to people. LORD DARLINGTON (smiling). Ah! you are beginning to reform me. It is a dangerous thing to reform any one, Lady Windermere. (Bows and exit). 2 high cards 3 round of a card game © 2006 The College Board. All rights reserved. Visit apcentral.collegeboard.com (for AP professionals) and www.collegeboard.com/apstudents (for students and parents). GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. 3 2006 AP® ENGLISH LITERATURE AND COMPOSITION FREE-RESPONSE QUESTIONS Question 3 (Suggested time—40 minutes. This question counts as one-third of the total essay section score.) Many writers use a country setting to establish values within a work of literature. For example, the country may be a place of virtue and peace or one of primitivism and ignorance. Choose a novel or play in which such a setting plays a significant role. Then write an essay in which you analyze how the country setting functions in the work as a whole. Do not merely summarize the plot. You may choose a work from the list below or another appropriate novel or play of similar literary merit. Adam Bede Adventures of Huckleberry Finn All the Pretty Horses Anna Karenina As I Lay Dying As You Like It The Bear Black Boy Bless Me, Ultima The Bonesetter’s Daughter Ceremony The Cherry Orchard David Copperfield Don Quixote East of Eden Ethan Frome For Whom the Bell Tolls Frankenstein The Grapes of Wrath House Made of Dawn King Lear Madame Bovary Mansfield Park A Midsummer Night’s Dream Obasan O Pioneers! Out of Africa The Scarlet Letter Tess of the D’Urbervilles Their Eyes Were Watching God A Thousand Acres Tom Jones The Vicar of Wakefield The Way We Live Now The Winter’s Tale Wuthering Heights STOP END OF EXAM © 2006 The College Board. All rights reserved. Visit apcentral.collegeboard.com (for AP professionals) and www.collegeboard.com/apstudents (for students and parents). 4 ...
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This note was uploaded on 11/04/2009 for the course UR 13045 taught by Professor Mr.u during the Spring '09 term at Magnolia Bible.

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