SPA 2 - Chris Stanton SPA#2 Sec 205(5 My dilemma consisted...

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Unformatted text preview: Chris Stanton SPA #2, Sec 205 (5) My dilemma consisted of the end-of-life decision being left to be decided upon by family members (children, in the case that the spouse may have been previously deceased) that can not agree on the course of action they want to take, whether it is to “pull the plug” or to keep the family member alive for hopes of recovery. The moral agent would be the doctor of the patient and he/she would be forced to decide on which family members to listen to. The first question that would almost have to be answered for the moral agent to make a sound decision would be concerning the history and feelings of the family. This situation becomes a dilemma so often because of the emotions involved, but setting those aside may be imperative for the doctor to make a decision. For instance, understanding a family’s background could allow the doctor to realize who to listen to. If some of the children were not as involved in their parent’s care over the years, it might be reasonable to place more...
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This note was uploaded on 11/05/2009 for the course B&SOC 205 at Cornell.

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SPA 2 - Chris Stanton SPA#2 Sec 205(5 My dilemma consisted...

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