Extra credit - Chris Stanton April 30, 2009 Section 204,...

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Chris Stanton April 30, 2009 Section 204, Jenn Thom-Santelli National Geographic Extra Credit It has always been said that “a picture is worth 1000 words”, but the truthfulness and accuracy of these “words” is often debated. The basic fact of photos is that the photographer chooses what will be seen within the frame, so right from the start the photo can be argued as being tampered by the photographer. However, unaltered photos are a mere reflection of the real world, which can be considered as conveying truth because a photo can not make something appear that was not already there. Photos such as those taken in National Geographic Magazine can be considered to convey truth because of the credibility of the source. Certain photos that have been displayed in the magazine have been thought to tip-toe the “line” of truthfulness because they show scenes that are so isolated and once-in-a-lifetime that the accuracy of these photos has been questioned. The controversy around photos like those that have appeared in National Geographic has lead to the discussion of whether or not they can be considered to convey truth and even if they are ethical. The capture of an image that will never happen again does raise some ethical issues because by photographing it and showing it to the world, it
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Extra credit - Chris Stanton April 30, 2009 Section 204,...

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