Utilitarianism is not concerned with the means or intentions of an action

Utilitarianism is not concerned with the means or intentions of an action

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Cimini, Stephanie L. 0721593 Quiz Section AE BIOEN 201 Ethics Assignment 1) Utilitarianism claims a moral action is one which consequences produce the greatest amount of happiness. The means or intentions by which an action is achieved are not important if the consequence or end of the action maximizes happiness of the greater good. Duty ethics revolves around the means and intentions of an action. Actions with intent of the prima facie duties and go about an according means are considered morally correct no matter what the consequences. The means of an action cannot be supported by a desirable end. Virtue ethics, justice ethics, and rights ethics are not directly justified by means, intentions, consequences or ends. Virtue ethics depends on the idea that morally correct actions are those which work toward the greater good through good behavior. In a sense, one might say the consequences of the action and the means and intentions of an action must all work toward goodness, and thus are all important. Justice ethics specifically states that an equal society is a moral society. Whether everyone must end up equal or intend to create equality is not specified. Right ethics claims all have a right to govern.
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This note was uploaded on 11/05/2009 for the course HSTAA 401 taught by Professor Conway during the Spring '09 term at University of Washington.

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Utilitarianism is not concerned with the means or intentions of an action

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