ex13[1] - Chapter 13 Experiments and Quasi-Experiments...

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Chapter 13 Experiments and Quasi-Experiments ± Solutions to Exercises 1. For students in kindergarten, the estimated small class treatment effect relative to being in a regular class is an increase of 13.90 points on the test with a standard error 2.45. The 95% confidence interval is 13.90 ± 1.96 × 2.45 = [9.098, 18.702]. For students in grade 1, the estimated small class treatment effect relative to being in a regular class is an increase of 29.78 points on the test with a standard error 2.83. The 95% confidence interval is 29.78 ± 1.96 × 2.83 = [24.233, 35.327]. For students in grade 2, the estimated small class treatment effect relative to being in a regular class is an increase of 19.39 points on the test with a standard error 2.71. The 95% confidence interval is 19.39 ± 1.96 × 2.71 = [14.078, 24.702]. For students in grade 3, the estimated small class treatment effect relative to being in a regular class is an increase of 15.59 points on the test with a standard error 2.40. The 95% confidence interval is 15.59 ± 1.96 × 2.40 = [10.886, 20.294]. 2. (a) On average, a student in class A (the “small class”) is expected to score higher than a student in class B (the “regular class”) by 15.89 points with a standard error 2.16. The 95% confidence interval for the predicted difference in average test scores is 15.89 ± 1.96 × 2.16 = [11.656, 20.124]. (b) On average, a student in class A taught by a teacher with 5 years of experience is expected to score lower than a student in class B taught by a teacher with 10 years of experience by 0.66 × 5 = 3.3 points. The standard error for the score difference is 0.17 × 5 = 0.85. The 95% confidence interval for the predicted lower score for students in classroom A is 3.3 ± 1.96 × 0.85 = [1.634, 4.966]. (c) The expected difference in average test scores in 15.89 + 0.66 × ( 5) = 12.59. Because of random assignment, the estimators of the small class effect and the teacher experience effect are uncorreleated. Thus, the standard error for the difference in average test scores is 1 2 222 [2.16 ( 5) 0.17 ] 2.3212. +− × = The 95% confidence interval for the predicted difference in average test scores in classrooms A and B is 12.59 ± 1.96 × 2.3212 = [8.0404, 17.140]. (d) The intercept is not included in the regression to avoid the perfect multicollinearity problem that exists among the intercept and school indicator variables. 3. (a) The estimated average treatment effect is TreatmentGroup Control XX = 1241 1201 = 40 points. (b) There would be nonrandom assignment if men (or women) had different probabilities of being assigned to the treatment and control groups. Let p Men denote the probability that a male is assigned to the treatment group. Random assignment means p Men = 0.5. Testing this null
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This note was uploaded on 11/06/2009 for the course ECON ECON111 taught by Professor Smith during the Spring '09 term at Punjab Engineering College.

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ex13[1] - Chapter 13 Experiments and Quasi-Experiments...

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