PHI-106-1SyllabusSpring2020.doc - MODERN PHILOSOPHY Spring 2020 Professor Taylor Table of Contents A Specific Course Information B Office Information C

PHI-106-1SyllabusSpring2020.doc - MODERN PHILOSOPHY Spring...

This preview shows page 1 - 3 out of 9 pages.

MODERN PHILOSOPHYSpring 2020Professor TaylorTable of ContentsA. Specific Course InformationB. Office InformationC. Course DescriptionD. Course Learning Outcomes and GoalsE. Educational Philosophy and Teaching ProceduresF. ParticipationG. Classroom PoliciesH. TextsI. Grading PoliciesJ. Support ServicesK. Course OutlineA. Specific Course Information1.Course #: PHI-106-12.Prerequisite: PHI-006 or the equivalent3.4 units of credit4.MWF 2:00am–3:05pm5.Adams 217B. Office Information1.Porter Center 82.Ext. 61573.[email protected]4.Office hours: MTWTh 3:15pm-4:30pmC. Course Description1.College catalog course description:“A critical survey of major Western philosophers of the modern period from Descartes through Kant to Thomas Reid. Includes emphasis on abstract reasoning.”2.Description of the course’s role in general education:This course satisfies the “Reasoning Abstractly” Common Inquiries General Education requirement. 2.1. Here is what the college’s general education document says about the Common Inquiries section: “Common Inquiries courses will, collectively, seek to introduce students to a range of methodological approaches that one might employ in the quest for knowledge. These courses would give particular attention to various ways of acquiring knowledge and evaluating information, and would incorporate appropriate consideration of the resources and implications of information technology.”
22.2. Here is the GE document’s statement about the courses that satisfy the Reasoning Abstractly requirement: “Courses satisfying this requirement focus on critical and analytical reasoning about non-empirical, abstract concepts, issues, theories, objects, and structures. Students in these courses should learn to understand and evaluate abstract arguments and explanations, analyze abstract concepts, and solve abstract problems.”2.3. More on Reasoning Abstractly: Reasoninginvolves making inferences or drawing conclusions. For instance, on the basis of your belief that there is a fire in the fireplace, you may reason to the conclusion that there is smoke coming out of the chimney outside. Abstractreasoning involves making inferences or drawing conclusions about relatively general sorts of things. For instance, in constructing a geometrical proof, you may infer that a certain theorem is true given a certain set ofaxioms and definitions. The relatively concrete reasoning in the first example is about a particular set of circumstances (a fire in this fireplace; smoke coming out of this chimney). The relatively abstract reasoning in the second example concerns general geometric truths that apply to a wide range of particular things. This breadth and generality of abstract reasoning makes it very useful. The kind of reasoning required to confirm general scientific laws (such as the law that “fire burns”) is also relatively abstract. However, mathematical and philosophical forms of reasoning are even more abstract, since they employ concepts that tend to be more general than scientific concepts are. In philosophy, the concepts of existence,

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture