Piracy Spring 2009

Piracy Spring 2009 - Piracy Professor Holt Click to edit...

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Click to edit Master subtitle style 11 Piracy Professor Holt Computer Crime
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22 Piracy What is piracy? the unauthorized duplication of goods protected by intellectual property law Software Music Movies Media in all forms This is not a problem that stems from the growth of the Internet You must keep yourself from engaging in piracy
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33 The Internet’s Impact The Internet has facilitated the growth of markets to purchase pirated software Internet auctions, peer to peer resources The improvements in computer technology facilitate the growth of piracy High speed connections Easy to use computer programs Anyone in the world can engage in piracy
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44 Forms of Software Piracy End-User piracy Users copy a product without appropriate licensing for each copy Casual copying and distribution between individuals Pre-installed Software When a computer manufacturer takes one copy of software and illegally installs it on more than one computer Internet Piracy When unauthorized copies are downloaded over the Internet Counterfeiting When illegal copies are made and distributed in packaging that reproduces the manufacturer's packaging
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55 Forms of Media Piracy Pirate recordings the unauthorized duplication of only the sound of legitimate recordings, but not the packaging Counterfeit recordings unauthorized recordings of the prerecorded sound and the unauthorized duplication of the packaging Bootleg recordings unauthorized recordings of live concerts, or musical broadcasts on radio or television Online piracy unauthorized uploading of a copyrighted sound recording and making it available to the public
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66 Economic Impacts Piracy has some economic impact Media piracy contributes to lost sales, jobs, wages and tax revenues. In 2002, piracy cost the worldwide software industry $13 billion in lost revenue. Costs to the US film industry are estimated at $15 billion In 2002, 7 million pirated DVDs were seized around the globe
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77 What Do We Know Hardcore pirates tend to be Male Younger Comfortable with computers Feel there is no ethical conflict with these behaviors Generally, piracy cuts across all age demographics
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88 Justifications? Piracy can be justified much like hacking the high prices of software Profiteering companies who make enough money as it is They won’t be harmed by a few copies If there is no security protection, then the item deserves to be cracked Keep information free to all
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99 How Do You Do It? Face to face exchanges between individuals
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This note was uploaded on 11/08/2009 for the course CJUS 4000 taught by Professor Dr.holt during the Spring '09 term at UNC Charlotte.

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Piracy Spring 2009 - Piracy Professor Holt Click to edit...

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