math245lab09

math245lab09 - Math245 Computer Lab set #9, Fall 2008 Hard...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: Math245 Computer Lab set #9, Fall 2008 Hard spring oscillator (nonlinear 2nd-order ODE) In this lab, we will just glance at the strange effect of nonlinearity by using a hard spring oscillator model as an example. Nonlinear spring model Consider a mechanical spring. When stretching the spring, the force needed to stretch ( F s ) is linearly proportional to the stretch ( x ), if the stretch is sufficiently small. In this case, the spring force is modeled by the Hookes law of linear spring . F s = kx where k is called spring constant . If the stretch is larger and larger, this Hookes law loses its validity, because some nonlinearity of the spring material comes into play. In some occasions, the spring force is modeled by the following nonlinear expression. F s = kx + sx 3 where s is a constant parameter. If s > 0, the spring called hard spring , otherwise ( s < 0) the spring is called soft spring ....
View Full Document

This note was uploaded on 11/08/2009 for the course MATH 245 at USC.

Page1 / 3

math245lab09 - Math245 Computer Lab set #9, Fall 2008 Hard...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online